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Thread: Oak floor lamp with stained glass shade -Build thread

  1. #1
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    Oak floor lamp with stained glass shade -Finally Completed

    This is a project that I started earlier in the year and put aside for a while. Now, I am starting again and plan to complete the lamp and give it to Margaret (my wife) for Christmas.In this post I will describe the work that I did on the project last spring.I spent a couple of months searching the internet for designs of arts and crafts lamps. Finally, in April, I found a design that I like in a book I spotted at Lee Valley. The book is entitled ‘Boxes, Clocks, Lamps & Small Projects and it is published by Woodworker’s Journal. Here is a picture of a Prairie Style table lamp made from quarter sawn oak with opaque glass from Kokomo Glass of Michigan (who made the glass used by Gustav Stickely).Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Prairie lamp 00 -Photo from Woodworker's Journal book.jpg 
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ID:	62449I believe that I can extend the design to make a floor lamp for our living room.The real trick to making this lamp is the many shop-made jigs employed in making the frame for the lampshade. I spent a day and a halfall working on these jigs and used them to make a prototype half-frame out of pine. Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Prarie lamp 06 -Testing adjacent sides of the prototype lampshade frame for 90 degree fit -small.JPG 
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ID:	62456 Actually, this is my second prototype and it is a little too big.Here is the tablesaw jig used to make the mortises and tenons at the 55 degree frame ends:Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Prairie lamp 01 -Mortise and tenon jig for lampshade frame -small.JPG 
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ID:	62454 Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Prairie lamp 02 -Mortise and tenon jig for lampshade frame -cutting a mortise -small.JPG 
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ID:	62455I took a stained glass course at for 8 evenings at a stained glass store in downtown Toronto and, at the store, I spotted some glass (also made by Kokomo) that will work for the lamp and will fit in with the colours in our living room. Here is a mock-up of the design that I think I will use:Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Prarie lamp 10 -Simulation of an idea for glass -small.JPG 
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ID:	62460I think that it is a good compromise between the “glass only” design that I started with and the more complicated “vertical herringbone strip down the middle” design that my stained glass instructor Caroline suggested. I hope that the lamp itself, will be a “work of art” and that this will compliment but not overwhelm the woodwork. So, I built a real panel:Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Prairie lamp 11 -A bout to solder together the pieces of a prototype glass segment -small.JPG 
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ID:	62457 Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Prairie lamp 12 -Protype glass segment up against a lamp bulb -taken with flash -small.JPG 
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ID:	62458 Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Prairie lamp 13 -Protype glass segment up against a lamp bulb -taken withou flash -small.JPG 
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ID:	62459 I do like it and expect that I will do something quite close to this for the real lamp, but I want to show the design to some folks and I want to think about it some more. I do have time, because I will be building the lamp as a present for Margaret next Christmas and I will build the real frame before making the glass panels to fit into it. There are three things I want to think about changing:
    1. Is the fact that one can see the light-bulb through the dark blue glass going to be a problem?
    2. Should the four light blue and amber panels form a continuum, as they do in the mock-up. Or can they be a contrast as in the prototype
    3. Should the proportions be changed or, perhaps, should the design itself be changed?
    Last edited by Frank Pellow; 12-06-2012 at 02:24 PM.
    Cheers, Frank

  2. #2
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    Here is an extract from my weekly journal written in late May:

    I’ve talked to several people about the glass for the lamp and everyone likes the glass exactly as I have done it. I did make one slight enhancement and that was to apply copper patina to the solder. Here is a photo taken after the copper patina has been applied:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Prairie lamp 13 -Protype glass with copper patina on the solder  -small.JPG 
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ID:	62465

    I have made a small start on cutting the quarter-sawn white oak lamp-shade frames. I have just enough wood for the lamp-shade frames but must purchase more for the lamp itself.
    Cheers, Frank

  3. #3
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    Today I got back to this project (after setting it aside for 5 months). I cut the rest of the glass needed for the shade and wrapped the necessaey edges with copper foil.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Prairie Lamp 14 -All glass now cut and wraped with foil -small.JPG 
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ID:	62466
    Cheers, Frank

  4. #4
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    Frank,

    That's a neat looking lamp. Myrna really likes the way you did the colored glass and thinks the copper effect is an excellent choice.

    Enjoy,

    JimB
    First of all you have to be smarter than the machine.
    VOTING MEMBER

  5. #5
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    Faith, Hope & Charity

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Pellow View Post
    ... There are three things I want to think about changing:
    1. Is the fact that one can see the light-bulb through the dark blue glass going to be a problem?
    2. Should the four light blue and amber panels form a continuum, as they do in the mock-up. Or can they be a contrast as in the prototype
    3. Should the proportions be changed or, perhaps, should the design itself be changed?
    1. Could you try a piece of translucent white material inside the blue to diffuse the light a bit so the bulb isn't so apparent?
    2. I like the continuum.
    3. The proportions look fine to me.
    Bill Arnold
    Citizen of Texas residing in Georgia.
    NRA Life Member and Member of Mensa
    My Weather Underground station

  7. #7
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    Thanks for the advise Bill.

    I like the suggestion about the white glass (or other material) behind the blue. Im not sure how I would attach it, but I will experiment.

    I have decided not to go with a continuum.
    Last edited by Frank Pellow; 11-07-2011 at 04:57 PM.
    Cheers, Frank

  8. #8
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    Frank is is possible to have a bracket to fasten a diffusion globe to put the light-bulb inside defuse the light?
    "Forget the flat stuff slap something on the spinny thing and lets go, we're burning daylight" Bart Leetch
    "If it ain't round you may be a knuckle dragger""Turners drag their nuckles too, they just do it at a higher RPM"Bart

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bart Leetch View Post
    Frank is is possible to have a bracket to fasten a diffusion globe to put the light-bulb inside defuse the light?
    I don't know Bart, but will check. Thanks for the suggestion.
    Cheers, Frank

  10. #10
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    I tried Bill's suggestion: "place translucent white material inside the blue to diffuse the light a bit so the bulb isn't so apparent" but all three pieces of transucent glass that I tried blocked too much light.

    I am still looking for some sort of diffusion globe as suggested by Bart. If anyone knows of such a thing, I would appreciate hearing from them.
    Cheers, Frank

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