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Thread: Shop Air

  1. #1

    Shop Air

    Some time ago I read an article about plumbing youir shop for air using a small pancake compressor. The plumbing was copper with short hose drops off of it if I am remembering correctly. Does anyone know where I can find that article? I am sure I still have the magazine.

  2. #2
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    There was this one from American Woodworker, tho it wasn't with copper lines
    http://americanwoodworker.com/blogs/...-with-air.aspx

  3. #3
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    That article was the first time I have seen rubber for a permanent installation. I have often seen copper, and iron pipe is acceptable although black pipe is subject to corrosion. Do not use PVC - I saw where some PVC air pipe in a wall exploded and blew out the Sheetrock - luckily it happened overnight with nobody around.

    Water will accumulate in an air pipe (which is why there is a slope and drain in a hard plumbed line). With the hoses, you will have to plan on periodic disassembly and cleaning to get rid of the crud that will grow in the moisture that will accumulate in the low spots.
    Charlie Plesums, Austin Texas
    (Retired early to become a custom furnituremaker)
    Lots of my free advice at www.solowoodworker.com

  4. #4
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    I plumbed mine with 1/2" and 3/4" black iron pipe. Lotta elbow grease and teflon tape and you can get it leak-proof relatively cheaply. Just pay attention to the slope lines and make sure you have blow-out valves on every downpipe and you'll be okay. Like everything else in a shop, make it as modular and madification-friendly as you can when you put it in.

  5. #5
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    I always seem to remember that one as Family Handyman, but I remember a discussion I had about it on another site. But I am sure the one you want is September 2006, issue 123 of American Woodworker.

    http://americanwoodworker.com/blogs/...-with-air.aspx

  6. #6
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    another vote for copper and drain valves below air outputs.. while on the subject,, of water,, what is the best water trap assembly? in your opinion.. i have the large toilet paper style right at the juntion of the black main line to the drops and then another decasant in the finish room to double protect for water.. but i am still getting water after it has been setting for a time without use.. the toilet paper type doesnt seem to be the answer at all..
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
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  7. #7
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    Ya Larry I know what you mean about the toilet paper type water filter. I think that you'll find that a Sears Roebuck catalog would probable take care of your problem.
    "Forget the flat stuff slap something on the spinny thing and lets go, we're burning daylight" Bart Leetch
    "If it ain't round you may be a knuckle dragger""Turners drag their nuckles too, they just do it at a higher RPM"Bart

  8. #8
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    I picked up one of these kits at HF a while ago. Once I get the electrician out and find a permanent home for the compressor I figure I'll hook this up. Some kind of Pex tubing.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    In my old shop, I plumbed it with black pipe and sloped the pipe to make sure any condensation would flow back to the tank.

    I figure I'll use this to figure out where and how I want things situated, and if it works well, then do it up in copper. Black pipe was fun, but copper would be a lot easier.
    Last edited by Brent Dowell; 11-11-2011 at 04:19 PM.
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brent Dowell View Post
    I picked up one of these kits at HF a while ago. Once I get the electrician out and find a permanent home for the compressor I figure I'll hook this up. Some kind of Pex tubing.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	FWW-4346.jpg 
Views:	23 
Size:	93.7 KB 
ID:	62557

    In my old shop, I plumbed it with black pipe and sloped the pipe to make sure any condensation would flow back to the tank.

    I figure I'll use this to figure out where and how I want things situated, and if it works well, then do it up in copper. Black pipe was fun, but copper would be a lot easier.
    Buddy of mine just plumber his auto repair shop with a similar off-the-shelf system and absolutely loves it. You may end up not needing to re-plumb if you use that stuff.

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