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Thread: How clean 3 year old gummy Delta 17-959L drill press chuck

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
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    Oceanside, So. Calif. 5 mi. to the ocean
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    How clean 3 year old gummy Delta 17-959L drill press chuck

    My Delta DP has the original 5/8, Jacobs key type chuck. The original manual said very little. It did not say anything about cleaning the chuck prior to use. I did not. I used it the way it came figuring the slight stiffness was due to being new.

    The chuck has been getting more and more difficult to turn by hand. It is now to the point that turning the chuck by hand turns the entire mechanism, including the motor. Sticky goo is seeping down from between the "collar" used to adjust size and the cylinder that contains the jaws.

    The Delta manual says nothing about cleaning the chuck (or anything else except the table). The Delta web site has no information about this. It is Saturday and Delta is not answering the telephone except to tell you when to call.

    My inclination is to get a clean empty food can, pour in some thinner and let the thing soak. Later slosh it up and down in clean thinner repeating as indicated by thinner color. That should give me a dry chuck. Many years ago I repaired typewriters (you know, those mechanical things with levers and without electric hook-up) dry was good. (WWII I took a test receiving code for 10 minutes, no errors permitted, at 102.2 wpm on a dry LC Smith typewriter).

    Is dry good for the chuck? How should I lube it?

    I sure managed to use a lot of words to ask two simple questions.

    Enjoy,

    JimB
    First of all you have to be smarter than the machine.
    VOTING MEMBER

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
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    RETIRED(!) in Austintown, Ohio
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    I've cleaned mine using aerosol automotive brake parts cleaner. I was amazed at how much gunk (technical term ) dripped/oozed out of it.

    Then I blasted it wit compressed air, and put a couple drops of light machine oil (I use sewing machine oil) between the body and the adjusting ring - NOT on the inside of the chuck(!).

    In my dusty (and seldom cleaned ) shop, I need to de-grunge (another technical term ) the chuck every couple years or so.
    Jim D.
    Adapt, Improvise, Overcome!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
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    Oceanside, So. Calif. 5 mi. to the ocean
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    Jim,

    Thanks for the info. I appreciate it.

    Enjoy,

    JimB
    First of all you have to be smarter than the machine.
    VOTING MEMBER

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Amherst, New Hampshire
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    10,604
    Whenever I get a new tool shipped with all the thick greasy stuff I use brake cleaner also. But your idea would work well too.
    Faith, Hope & Charity

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Decatur, Alabama
    Posts
    518
    Break cleaner works great, but my skin doesn't do so well with it. Mineral spirits works well to remove most kinds of cosmaline. I've also found the citrus motorcycle chain cleaner from advance auto is a nice and low odor product. Cleaned my grizzly stuff up great.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Oceanside, So. Calif. 5 mi. to the ocean
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    I just added a post to the new member from Iowa. In it I told him about the great advice available here. You guys just made points for dear old FWW in that vein.

    Thanks and Enjoy,

    JimB
    First of all you have to be smarter than the machine.
    VOTING MEMBER

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Syracuse, Nebraska
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    669
    http://wiki.vintagemachinery.org/Jac...ckRebuild.ashx

    I've done this more many times over the years when I worked as a tool & die maker. You can get rebuild kits to replace the jaws and bearings. Takes about an hour.

    Your chuck probably will do with just a cleaning. All of the ones I rebuilt were production tools that had several thousand hours of heavy use. Also, most production chucks cost several hundred dollars, compared to the typical hobby use chuck.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Oceanside, So. Calif. 5 mi. to the ocean
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    Roger,

    That was really interesting. I have wondered what the insides of a chuck looked like---now I know.

    Thanks for taking the time to photo and show.

    Enjoy,

    JimB
    First of all you have to be smarter than the machine.
    VOTING MEMBER

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Delton, Michigan
    Posts
    17,472
    thanks roger never seen the insides of one of those before and figured that if they turned hard it was just the chuck..never dreamed of cleaning one up..
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
    One hand washes the other!
    Don't put off today till tomorrow!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Kansas City, Missouri
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    Thanks Roger, I've got at least one around that could use a good cleaning like that, may give it a try.
    Darren

    To a small child, the perfect granddad is unafraid of big dogs and fierce storms but absolutely terrified of the word “boo.” – Robert Brault

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