Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 20

Thread: Maybe a wee obsessive...

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Bellingham
    Posts
    2,450

    Arrow Maybe a wee obsessive...

    I had flattened the bottom of the bench top so that it could sit flatly against the aprons, but I was not obsessive about it as it only had to be completely in plane where it contacted the aprons and the cross members of the base.

    The top I wanted to be completely flat as I was going to be referencing all my work off of it. I know that it is wood and wood will move, but I was determined that it would move from a flat reference point. It became a battle of hard maple and me. The maple almost won out, but my opponent underestimated my staying power.


    I first started off with my #8 and my #4 both set with rank cut. The #8 I ran across the width tying to get it flat that way.

    My belief is that you have to make a surface concave before you can make it flat. I concentrated on hollowing the center out. It takes quite a while to make something concave but little time to make it convex, so I stayed clear of the edges for the most part. I used the #4 to hit some high spots.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSCN0553.jpg 
Views:	54 
Size:	61.9 KB 
ID:	63898 Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSCN0554.jpg 
Views:	47 
Size:	55.6 KB 
ID:	63899 Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSCN0555.jpg 
Views:	49 
Size:	48.9 KB 
ID:	63900

    This hard maple was chewing up blades edges on my A2. I had to up the bevel angle to keep some decent edge retention. I was popping blades out quite often.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSCN0557.jpg 
Views:	50 
Size:	58.8 KB 
ID:	63901

    I then shifted over to my #7 set with a fine cut to prevent tearout as I started to fine plane the both the width & now the length. This where I really ended up pulling the blades for resharpening. A couple time of doing that and I got really smart when I remembered that my #4.5 had the same blade as my #7. Now I was hot swapping blades and the top rolled over and submitted.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSCN0560.jpg 
Views:	52 
Size:	53.4 KB 
ID:	63902

    Here I am running a finishing pass with my #4.5.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSCN0563.jpg 
Views:	52 
Size:	45.9 KB 
ID:	63903 Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSCN0564.jpg 
Views:	49 
Size:	28.6 KB 
ID:	63904

    I have checked the top and it is flat. There were time during the process I doubted my sanity, but now it is over I feel it was worth it. Below is the evidence of my labors.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSCN0567.jpg 
Views:	53 
Size:	63.7 KB 
ID:	63906

    On the next bench, I think I will use something a little softer than hard maple.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails DSCN0566.jpg  
    Last edited by Bill Satko; 12-31-2011 at 05:43 PM.
    “When love and skill work together, expect a masterpiece.” - John Ruskin
    “Nowadays people know the price of everything and the value of nothing.” - Oscar Wilde

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    somewhere east of Queen Creek, AZ - South East of Phoenix
    Posts
    8,529
    and now your forearms feel like Popeye's...
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Reno NV
    Posts
    13,366
    How many hours do you think that took Bill? Looks fantastic BTW.
    Programmer - An organism that turns coffee into software.
    If all your friends are exactly like you, What an un-interesting life it must be.
    "A door is what a dog is perpetually on the wrong side of" Ogden Nash


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Central Illinois
    Posts
    936
    Bill, you might not like the effort it took to get the top the way you wanted it, but you have a beautiful and functional work bench to last a lifetime.

    Well done!

    Bruce
    Bruce Shiverdecker - Retired Starving Artist ( No longer a Part timer at Woodcraft, Peoria, Il.)

    "The great thing about turning is that all you have to do is remove what's not needed and you have something beautiful. Nature does the hard part!"

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Central NY State
    Posts
    3,374
    That bench looks absolutely great. It'll be hard to bash bang cut and stomp on it, but I'm sure it's ready for whatever you can throw at it. Looks to me like it can last well over one lifetime, or anyway, my remaining life expectancy.
    If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Oceanside, So. Calif. 5 mi. to the ocean
    Posts
    4,944
    Beautiful job with beautiful results!

    A bench for a lifetime and then pass on to the younger generation.

    I enjoyed your pics.

    Enjoy,

    JimB

    Happy New Year!
    First of all you have to be smarter than the machine.
    VOTING MEMBER

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Delton, Michigan
    Posts
    17,477
    well done bill.. whats the liguide you are using to show the different depths.. you show it in the first pic and agin later on? i dont see you wanting to use this bench like ken mentioned and get it nicked just look at it and admire your work
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
    One hand washes the other!
    Don't put off today till tomorrow!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Oak Harbor Washington on Whidbey Island
    Posts
    3,135
    Well it's 'plane' to see you flattened that sucker right out. Tell me again how may cans of spinach took. From here it looks great. We need to get together so I can see it first hand. I'm sure it's more impressive close up.
    "Forget the flat stuff slap something on the spinny thing and lets go, we're burning daylight" Bart Leetch
    "If it ain't round you may be a knuckle dragger""Turners drag their nuckles too, they just do it at a higher RPM"Bart

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    RETIRED(!) in Austintown, Ohio
    Posts
    5,323
    Nice job, Bill. That really looks great.

    Now...spill some paint, and some grease, on it, and maybe punch in a few chisel divots and screwdriver gouges so it'll look like you're actually using it.
    Jim D.
    Adapt, Improvise, Overcome!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Bellingham
    Posts
    2,450
    Thanks everyone! I appreciate the comments.


    Quote Originally Posted by Brent Dowell View Post
    How many hours do you think that took Bill?
    I really don't have any idea. Problem is I have working on it off and on for a long time, but if I could just add the hours working on it, I might be surprised. Then again, I might find out that I am slower than erosion.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim C Bradley View Post
    A bench for a lifetime and then pass on to the younger generation.
    Funny you should say that, as I was putting on some finish today, I realized that this bench will be here when I am not. I will take good care of it, like I do all my tools. I then decided that before I passed on I was going to give it away to someone who would take as good care of it as I did. I then imagined that this workbench could last many many years into future and that someone could see my name and date underneath it and wonder who this person was. It gave me a very satisfied feeling knowing this workbench could become somewhat of a memorial for me.

    Quote Originally Posted by larry merlau View Post
    well done bill.. whats the liguide you are using to show the different depths.. you show it in the first pic and agin later on?
    Larry, that is only shine from the final pass of a sharp and finely set smoothing plane. This hard maple takes a beautiful shine.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim DeLaney View Post
    Now...spill some paint, and some grease, on it, and maybe punch in a few chisel divots and screwdriver gouges so it'll look like you're actually using it.
    Jim, you must have been watching me this morning. I was going to start prepping the lumber for the lower shelf and had to sharpen some blades. In putting a blade back in the plane on the bench and I noticed that I had smeared some sharpening grunge from the back of my hands onto the top. Yikes! I had to plane it off because it would not wipe off and I then decided to take a different tack for the day. I needed to get some protection on the entire bench before I went any farther. I just finished up applying a mixture of equal parts turpentine, BLO and spar varnish over the entire bench. This is going to be like having a new car.
    Last edited by Bill Satko; 01-01-2012 at 12:05 AM.
    “When love and skill work together, expect a masterpiece.” - John Ruskin
    “Nowadays people know the price of everything and the value of nothing.” - Oscar Wilde

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •