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Thread: Edge rounding / cornering plane or tool

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Central PA
    Posts
    638

    Edge rounding / cornering plane or tool

    I am looking for a tool to ease or round the edges of boards, I see that lee valley has a few things that will accomplish that

    http://www.leevalley.com/US/wood/pag...01&cat=1,41182

    http://www.leevalley.com/US/wood/pag...82&cat=1,41182

    http://www.leevalley.com/US/wood/pag...84&cat=1,41182

    What do you guys use. I have used a regular block plane in the past but when I was doing a bunch of pieces I ended up with some parts more rounded that others, and depending on how much of a hurry I was in I didn't notice until too late.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    GTA Ontario Canada
    Posts
    12,251
    router with curved bit.

    Dave you know if you want a chamfer lv has a small attachment for the block plane that will give you a chamfer

    Sent from my MB860 using Tapatalk
    cheers

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Central PA
    Posts
    638
    I have been using a router lately but my smallest round over is 1/16" radius which is kinda big for some stuff, I just like the idea of being able to grab a tool and do it quickly without having to setup the router. I usually want a round over, not a chamfer.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Oceanside, So. Calif. 5 mi. to the ocean
    Posts
    4,944
    Hi,

    I have owned and used number one and number two. Yes they work. Yes it is VERY EASY to screw up with them. I would avoid them. Unless you hold them just right they can give different results. They can catch in the grain and pull up a whale of a lot more wood than you want them to. For building a back deck or a set of outside stairs I would try one if I had it. However, I sure would not even let either of them in the same room with a piece of furniture to be wood.

    I had two cheap versions of number three (chamfer and rounding) from Rockler. All they built was my frustration. I gave them to Glenn and he couldn't make either of them work well enough that he would use them near furniture quality wood either. I am quite sure he trashed them.

    I have never had a problem with Lee Valley. You might try the third one. If it does not work, return it. However, I think that there has to be a better way. If you can get to the wood with a router, use it with a rounding bit. That seems to work all of the time for me. I am sure that Glenn uses a router for this type of thing also. Glenn is the type of person who looks into everything. He reads all of the magazine articles to help him make a decision. When possible he uses scrap wood to try any tool he can beg or borrow before spending his money.

    I hope this helped.

    Enjoy,

    JimB
    First of all you have to be smarter than the machine.
    VOTING MEMBER

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Oceanside, So. Calif. 5 mi. to the ocean
    Posts
    4,944
    Hi Again,

    Your 8:00 post was not there when I started writing my reply. When all I want to do is soften an edge I use the Sand-Flee Finishing-Mops. I have a 400, a 220 and a 120 grit. If I had only one I would choose the 220. We built a desk for the boy next door to take to college. We finished all of the edges with the 220. It worked great. It is fast and easy to control.

    Enjoy,

    JimB
    First of all you have to be smarter than the machine.
    VOTING MEMBER

  6. #6
    I have always used a router and a number of different bits, depending on the size of the roundover
    Anybody can become a woodworker, but only a Craftsmen can hide his mistakes!

    The Bible tells us to love our neighbors, and also to love our enemies; probably because they are generally the same people.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Delton, Michigan
    Posts
    17,472
    dave i have this one that you linked to and like it alot..LINK but you do need to watch the grain direction where as in a router thats not as important..
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
    One hand washes the other!
    Don't put off today till tomorrow!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Central NY State
    Posts
    3,374
    A block plane will do nicely. If you're concerned about matching and accuracy, you can draw pencil lines, and plane to them. If you're looking to make roundovers less than 1/16", then a couple swipes with a plane and some sandpaper will be fast and easy.
    If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Thomasville, GA
    Posts
    5,992
    Power tool junky here. Router and assortment of bits down to 1/16". Past that, a few swipes with 150 sandpaper knocks it off.
    Bill Arnold
    Citizen of Texas residing in Georgia.
    NRA Life Member and Member of Mensa
    My Weather Underground station

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Central PA
    Posts
    638
    well for now I think I will use a combination of a block plane and router. I was afraid that the specialized planes would be prone to tearout.

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