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Thread: Slowly getting there ...

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    St. Louis, MO
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    583

    Slowly getting there ...

    In September of 2010, i came across a 1959 Powermatic 65 that a fellow had gotten from the Springfield Missouri public schools. It still had the inventory stickers on it. (I am amazed at how much old school shop machinery there is floating around out there). I brought it home, knowing i didn't really have the time to get to it right then and there. Normally i don't bring things home unless it fits a real need and i have time to get to it right away - small shop - tight storage space. But this arn disease has apparently progressed to a more severe stage.

    This saw had an overarm guard, newer (metalic green not the pea green) factory fence, 1.5 hp 3 phase motor, missing dust door, missing miter gage, a break in the table casting where the fence rail mounts, and worn arbor bearings. Not a basket case, but needing some attention. I did have time to start looking into things and cobbling together some bits and parts i'd need.

    Fast forward to the post Christmas lull in the shop. Perfect time to dive into a project for me AND clear up some storage space. I found that, not only were the arbor bearings toast, the arbor pulley had been loose on the shaft, wallowing off about 5 thousandths both from the shaft and the pulley. It's pretty handy that my Dad is a retired journeyman machinist. I ordered a new arbor assembly - he bored and sleeved the tripple pulley for me. He's also repairing the broken riser stop on the arbor casting that keeps it from raising too high.

    So far, i've gotten a new 3hp single phase motor, a mag starter, dust door, and a mobile base. The new arbor assembly is on the way, along with a new set of belts. I've disassembled, painted, and tuned up the factory fence, am making the little dust chute that keeps the blade from throwing pitch and dust directly onto the trunnion assembly, stripped and painted the cabinet, turn wheels, and other pieces, and disassembled and cleaned up the internals.

    I still have to fix the fence mounting point and repaint the top, come up with a motor cover (the shop made one that came with the saw isn't deep enough for the replacement motor), assemble and install the internals, repaint the overarm guard, wire it up, and put it to use.

    This will be a step up from the General International contractor saw i've been using (It's a fine saw, but not quite in the same league as this). I'm pretty excited about how it's coming along. It should be done in a couple of weeks. I will post more pics, but here's the "before" shot in the shop of the previous owner.

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    paulh

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Delton, Michigan
    Posts
    17,475
    that will be daylight and dark from the contractor saw paul...looking good so far how did yu handle the cracked table you mentioned?
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
    One hand washes the other!
    Don't put off today till tomorrow!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Bellingham
    Posts
    2,450
    Looking forward to your re-build Paul. I have been watching Craigslist, because right now there is a lot of old iron for sale. Where did you get the missing parts?
    “When love and skill work together, expect a masterpiece.” - John Ruskin
    “Nowadays people know the price of everything and the value of nothing.” - Oscar Wilde

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    St. Louis, MO
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    Quote Originally Posted by larry merlau View Post
    that will be daylight and dark from the contractor saw paul...looking good so far how did yu handle the cracked table you mentioned?
    Larry,
    The threaded mounting hole that you screw the fence mounting bolt into broke. The edge of the top is thicker and taller there, but it still broke. The "top half" of the threaded hole is still there. The piece that would make up the bottom half broke clean away. The previous owner welded a piece of steel bar stock to the front edge of the table at that location, drilled, and threaded it for the fence bolt. It's serviceable, but if i ever decide to go with a different fence (i've got a Biesemeyer style fence i'm considering using because the stock fence only goes 26" away from the blade) i'll need to fix it properly so that there isn't an extra thickness of steel scabbed onto the front of the table. To fix it, i'm going to grind off the steel bar stock that was welded on, remove the piece of the table top edge where the broken mounting hole is, and braze in a 1/2" thick piece of steel to replace it. I'll drill and tap the 1/2" steel for the fence mounting bolt. This way, the front edge of the table will be flush across its entire width, and i can bolt the Bies fence (or any other) right onto it if i decide to later on.

    If the stock fence rails were a bit longer, i might not bother, since it seems to work fine as is. But, since i've got the saw apart anyway, i might as well take a little extra time to fix it the "right" way.

    I'll post some pics of the process as i move through it.

    paulh

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    St. Louis, MO
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    583
    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Satko View Post
    Looking forward to your re-build Paul. I have been watching Craigslist, because right now there is a lot of old iron for sale. Where did you get the missing parts?
    Bill,

    I got the dust door, arbor assembly (with bearings, spacers, washers, and blade nut), and new set of belts from Woodworking Machinery Services in Belleville, Wisconsin (608 424-0067). My saw went out of production in 1965, but it shares these and many other parts with the model 66, which was made from 1966 through 2010 - quite a long run and lots of parts available. Other parts, like the worn tripple arbor pulley and broken blade raising stop are being repaired. I'm also fabricating a couple of pieces (dust chute and motor cover).

    Other sources for parts include the "Bring out your dead" forum over at www.owwm.org, Ebay, and Powermatic. The motor came from an electrical surplus supply house. It was a new surplus motor, still in its packaging - really cheap. I got the magnetic starter used through one of the woodworking forums (don't remember which one) and the start/stop switch from my local Habitat Restore.

    Other than that, it's been a fair amount of time cleaning up bolts, nuts, and cast pieces at the wire wheel, rattle cans of primer and paint, and some rust removal with a braided wire wheel on the angle grinder.

    paulh

  6. #6
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    Sep 2007
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    St. Louis, MO
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    Some progress pics -

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  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Kansas City, Missouri
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    That's cleaning up real nicely Paul. Nice shine on the side of the fence.
    Darren

    To a small child, the perfect granddad is unafraid of big dogs and fierce storms but absolutely terrified of the word “boo.” – Robert Brault

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Bellingham
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    2,450
    Paul, I just love the color scheme. That red just pops and makes the entire saw look something special.
    “When love and skill work together, expect a masterpiece.” - John Ruskin
    “Nowadays people know the price of everything and the value of nothing.” - Oscar Wilde

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    St. Louis, MO
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    Time to showcase my Dad's handiwork. First the pulley sleeve - nothing earthshattering here, but a very neat and clean job of it. He centered the pulley based on the V-groove machining, bored it out and turned a recess on the face to receive the flange on the bushing/spacer, turned down a piece of rod with an integral flange and bored it out to make the bushing/spacer, polished the borings in the pulley and the bushing to ensure an exact fit on the arbor shaft and bushing, cut the key slot in the bushing, deepened the key way in the pulley, made a deeper woodruf key to fit, drilled and tapped the pulley for two set screws at 90 degrees apart, marked and machined a dimple in the arbor shaft to positively engage the 2nd set screw, put it all together, and rebalanced the assembly. He also indicated the runout at both ends of the shaft and the blade flange - somewhere around 2 ten-thousandths.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Next up - fixing the broken height stop on the arbor casting. The piece is supposed to look like this:
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    The stop (circled in black) was broken off where it extends from the main casting. The part cirlced in red was missing on my saw.

    So, Dad milled the rough broken surface flat and square, then machined a piece of bar stock to fit. He drilled it to accept a couple of allen screws so that their shoulders would be recessed. Then he drilled and tapped the casting for the screws. The one thing that still needs to be done - locate, drill, tap, and install the adjustment screw. It will go through the middle of the new steel piece and stop against the trunnion casting. There is an arc milled smooth on the trunnion casting that the end of the adjustment screw will glide along if the blade is all the way up when adjusting the blade angle. Here are the pics so far. I'll take another when i get the adjustment screw installed.
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    Now I can see the finish line.
    paulh

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
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    RETIRED(!) in Austintown, Ohio
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    Interesting - and ingenious - fixes. Both were pretty innovative, and will probably make the saw stronger and more accurate that it ever was before.

    I really love seeing the 'practical' thinking of some of the "old masters" of machines. Gotta wonder if those talents will get passed along to future generations, too.
    Jim D.
    Adapt, Improvise, Overcome!

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