View Poll Results: Where will the furniture of today be or considered in the future

Voters
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  • just a piece of wood furniture

    15 36.59%
  • something that they will hand down to there children

    19 46.34%
  • hold value ike antiques once did in our time

    6 14.63%
  • trash no need for it got plastic

    5 12.20%
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Thread: The Past, Present and the Future of woodworking

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    Delton, Michigan
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    The Past, Present and the Future of woodworking

    the methods that are used to make a piece of furniture in todays world, we are probably over thinking this stuff. we tend to think that others will care in the years to come and actually the way this world has changed it will probably be meaningless.. even in todays world the desire for old antiques and old ways are falling off considerable and the family traditions are going as fast or faster as well.so in this thread vote and voice your veiws of where that piece that is made today is gonna be tomorrow or in the next generation, will it matter anymore like the antiques we have looked back on today.
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
    One hand washes the other!
    Don't put off today till tomorrow!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Syracuse, Nebraska
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    669
    I know stuff I've built for my daughter will be passed on to my grand-daughter. And I hope my grand-daughter will do the same. I'm building a bed and dresser for her that I'm fairly certain will go to my great grand-child if there is one.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Constantine, MI
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    7,890
    For my part, nearly all I have built to date has been for friends and family and I think that personal connection will insure that the pieces will go at least one more generation before hitting the scrap pile of history and wannabees. I recently sold my first piece on line, a small jewelry box. Oddly enough, to a fellow I worked with some years back who was looking for something unique for his bride. So, I really can't speak to what fate my work may meet as the personal connection trumps work sold to strangers. I'd like to think that the fact that my stuff is 'real' wood and built more solidly than the run-of-the-mill stuff sold in stores would mean something, but I just don't know. Most people don't seem to place as high a value on quality construction any more. They gladly pay $600 for a Pottery Barn piece that is painted pine or poplar with poor joinery and binding drawers and doors. I'm a bit baffled by that.
    Host of the 2017 Family Woodworking Gathering - Sunken Wood

    “We all die. The goal isn't to live forever; the goal is to create something that will.” - Chuck Palahniuk
    www.wrworkshop.com

  4. #4
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    Nov 2006
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    Delton, Michigan
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    i do think that the stuff we have made for family could be passed down with a desire to have them from the offspring. as long as the next generation respects things of that nature, i have seen some new generation that have no respect for grandpa's table or chair..and that is what bothers me. i know it shouldnt, i am not gonna be here anyway.. but on the other side of things this trend be it good or bad can reflect in how we go about building the next piece.
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
    One hand washes the other!
    Don't put off today till tomorrow!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Thomasville, GA
    Posts
    5,992
    I would like to think that some of the pieces I've created will stand the test of time. Frankly, I'm not going to lose any sleep over it, either way. I've made some good stuff and, while I'd like for my children and grandchildren to have an appreciation for them, I have no control over that. We have many true antiques in our home and, when they have been pointed out to children, the response is usually a blank stare. Maybe, in time, they will understand.
    Bill Arnold
    Citizen of Texas residing in Georgia.
    NRA Life Member and Member of Mensa
    My Weather Underground station

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    new york city burbs
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    10,188
    Im pretty certain my son will hold on to every piece Ive made him, and probably pass them down if he no longer needs them.
    Hes cheap, so getting free furniture that he has a say in is something hes not going to give up anytime soon.
    My spoiled brat other child is wondering where her dining set and bedroom set are.

    rennie-I believe the average person(average anyone) who is buying a small coffee table, or other similar piece, want to see it and touch it before they commit to purchase.
    Most dont worry about joinery, just how it looks and if the color is right for their room.
    Im sure if you had a showroom full of your furniture, and had time to explain the craftsmanship compared to dowel built stuff, more would purchase your pieces instead.
    Human Test Dummy

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
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    RETIRED(!) in Austintown, Ohio
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    5,321
    Some of what we've built for friends and family - or on commission, etc. - might get passed down for a few generations. At least I hope so!

    Rant on:
    The commercial stuff that's available today is likely to be junked even before the next generation will be ready for it. Today's commercial stuff, for the most part, has degenerated into little better than junk, and it's designed for ease and economy of manufacturing, not for durability, style, or build quality.

    Bearing in mind that Duncan-Phyffe, Stickley, Roycrofters, etc. were all the commercial stuff of their time - but times were different, then. Quality made your reputation then - not price or convenience. Our marketdisintegratedrated significantly to where now it's mainly about profit instead of quality.

    Okay, rant off...
    Jim D.
    Adapt, Improvise, Overcome!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Thomasville, GA
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    5,992
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim DeLaney View Post
    ... Rant on:
    The commercial stuff that's available today is likely to be junked even before the next generation will be ready for it. ...
    And, it's cheap - relatively speaking - so folks can replace it when they get "BORED" with it, without any hit to the budget! When I started building better pieces and found I enjoyed it, many people raved about my stuff - some winning prizes. The problem became, as I talked with people who wanted a custom piece, is that they have no idea of the value of a piece of custom furniture. If I can't charge the true value of a custom piece of furniture, I'd rather just keep building as a hobby. I had long email discussions with a respected woodworker whose philosophy is that he knows he can't charge more than furniture store prices, so that's what he does. I'm not going there! I'd rather do what I want when I want and get what I can when I can.
    Bill Arnold
    Citizen of Texas residing in Georgia.
    NRA Life Member and Member of Mensa
    My Weather Underground station

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Catalunya
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    4,632
    I think it will depend very much on the type of furniture we are talking about, cheap furniture made of chip board and melamine, or chip board and veneer will not withstand much time. It is not made to last and it is cheap. Some other more expensive furniture made of chipboard and better veneers may last longer but it will decay and eventually perish.

    Massif wood furniture, well designed and made, will stay for as long as the owner /heir wants, and here taste, room, and trend have a lot of influence. Custom made furniture made by some recognised maker/designer will stay for a lot longer due to the added value.

    One should ask oneself many questions about this, for instance an antique piece of furniture is pricey because of the wood used, the craftmanship, the design or just because it is old? According to a friend of mine who owns an antique shop, a piece that is less than a 100 years old is not an antique, it is only a vintage piece.

    Not an easy debate this one, and with no a definite ending or so I think
    Best regards,
    Toni

    __________________________________________________ __________________________________________________ _________________
    web site:http://www.toniciuraneta.com
    I also dream of a shop with north light where my hands can be busy, my soul rest and my mind wander...

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Delton, Michigan
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    so using some of the logic here, we should just make the pieces of good quality rather go to the trouble to do processes by hand instead of machine for instance. or use plywood instead of glueing up panels where possible. the old furniture shops used plywood a fair amount when they had it and could.. kinda like not walking to work if you can ride.
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
    One hand washes the other!
    Don't put off today till tomorrow!

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