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Thread: New finish over old

  1. #1

    New finish over old

    I have some birch veneer surfaces that were varathaned several years ago. They only got one coat before life got in the way. What special steps do I have to take, besides a light sanding, to prepare them for the extra coats of varathane they should have gotten (insert "guilty" smiley here). Or is it too late? Thanks!

  2. #2
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    I'd first give them a good washing, before a scuff sand. But that is all I'd do, Susan.
    There's usually more than one way to do it...
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  3. #3
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    I'd wipe/wash with naphtha or paint thinner first - to remove any dirt, grease or waxes - then sand lightly (220 or even 320 will do).

    Apply at least two more coats of the Varathane, sanding between coats with 220 or 320 to remove any imperfections. After the final coat has dried for about a week, go over it lightly with 4-0 steel wool or gray ScotchbriteŽ pads, then wax it.
    Jim D.
    Adapt, Improvise, Overcome!

  4. #4
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    yup what jim and art said
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
    One hand washes the other!
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim DeLaney View Post
    I'd wipe/wash with naphtha or paint thinner first - to remove any dirt, grease or waxes - then sand lightly (220 or even 320 will do).

    Apply at least two more coats of the Varathane, sanding between coats with 220 or 320 to remove any imperfections. After the final coat has dried for about a week, go over it lightly with 4-0 steel wool or gray ScotchbriteŽ pads, then wax it.
    yep what he said
    I dream a lot. I do more painting when I'm not painting. It's in the subconscious.
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  6. #6
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    I would do a wipe down with mineral spirits or naptha as suggested. Keep in mind the overall sheen you are after, i.e., gloss, or satin/semi gloss. I would lightly sand with 320x with an open coat sandpaper, not garnet or aluminum oxide. I would use a silicon carbide paper intended for dry use (light gray), that's called "No-Fil", or "Fre-Cut".

    After application of topcoating, the finish will have a certain sheen from being wiped on or brushed. Any rubing on that finish will change the way it looks, so experiment with a sample. If it needs rubbing, I wouldn't use steel wool, but rather a synthetic microfiber pad, like a white ScotchBrite pad (very smooth). Allow each application to thoroughly dry before adding another topcoat.





    .

  7. #7
    You have all been most helpful! My house and I thank you

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2009
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    Hi folks,
    If it's the same can of finish from several years ago, you might want to test it to make sure it still drys OK.

    Bob

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