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Thread: Opinions needed - refacing brick fireplace

  1. #1
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    Opinions needed - refacing brick fireplace

    We have a painted brick fireplace that we would like to reface with stone tiles (12x24). The first bid we got is going to use a primer (Tec Multipurpose Primer http://www.tecspecialty.com/content/...product_id=149 ) to prep the brick. Next the tiles will be thinset to the brick.

    I have my concerns about this. Seems like it depends totally on the paint sticking well to the brick. As I understand it, there will be no actual mechanical fasteners between brick and thinset/tiles.

    What do you think about this method?

    What would you do differently?



    Another issue...
    The previous owner installed an insert. To fit the insert, the lintel (steel angle iron) and a row of bricks were removed! Should I be concerned about this?

    Assuming this is a problem to be corrected, how would you go about fixing it?

    Does anyone have Mike Holmes's phone number?

    Thanks for all your input.

    John...

  2. #2
    I did a stone job on the fireplace we had in Levittown Pa a long time ago. We ended up nailing metal lathe first to the painted brick, then thinset. Once that dried, the we installed the stone about 3 tiers at a time. Was a bear of a job, but it did turn out nice
    Anybody can become a woodworker, but only a Craftsmen can hide his mistakes!

    The Bible tells us to love our neighbors, and also to love our enemies; probably because they are generally the same people.

  3. #3
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    Dom's method is what I'd do, but first, get that iron lintel replaced. The angle iron lintel supports eht whole weight of the structure above it. Without it, it anything sags it'll cause the whole center portion to fail and maybe collapse.
    Jim D.
    Adapt...Improvise...Overcome!

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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim DeLaney View Post
    Dom's method is what I'd do, but first, get that iron lintel replaced. The angle iron lintel supports eht whole weight of the structure above it. Without it, it anything sags it'll cause the whole center portion to fail and maybe collapse.
    We worked on a new car wash building that the mason had convened/coned the owner that he could just block over each on the door openings. So what he did was build a frame out of 2x stock for each door. Than he blocked the over the top of the door and filled the first few rows with mortar. Calming that when the block set up the frame could be removed and the weave of the block and the mortar would become the sporting header. Well long story short about a month after the mason left all of these so called headers started failing. Part of our job was to add a steel beam to the top of each door. And I can tell you that cost a ton more than if the mason had just done the job right the first time.
    As for you painted brick and thin set not me not in my house and not in a customers house that I would be responsible for. Do what Dom said or fasten duarock cement board to the brick and tile/stone to that. And yes fix the lintel.
    It could be worse You could be on fire.
    Stupid hurts.

  5. #5
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    Man, it sounds like this could be a post that I needed to start!
    We have an oversized fireplace, about 6' wide with an insert, does have a correct lintel, that was painted baby blue. BABY BLUE!!!! Horrible looking. The wall the fireplace is on is only 18' wide, so I really don't want to add anything to it. We are thinking about painting it again, probably a dark charcoal matt finish with black matt for the mortar. I'm thinking we will have Oak cabinets and Oak bookshelves, with the back panel stained black flanking it, with an Oak mantel. Hoping that the fireplace will disappear. The color renditions I've done in my Punch Home Design software looks promising. Now all I need is money.

    Anxious to hear how your's turns out. Please post pictures. Jim.
    Coolmeadow Setters...
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  6. #6
    THis is the screening I used, http://www.lowes.com/ProductDisplay?...llow&cId=PDIO1

    Secured with concrete nails.

    Hope this helps and I wholeheartedly agree with everyone that recommends repairing or replacing the lintel

    (And buy the cheap concrete mixer from HF...you will be glad you did)
    Anybody can become a woodworker, but only a Craftsmen can hide his mistakes!

    The Bible tells us to love our neighbors, and also to love our enemies; probably because they are generally the same people.

  7. #7
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    Thanks for everyone's input. We ended up hiring a tile guy to do the hearth and 4 ft. up the fireplace. We went with metal lath and mud for the base and to build it out some. I talked to the owner of the local fireplace store about the missing lintel. He said don't worry about it. After the mortar cures (it's been there for 40+ yrs!) the metal lintel does little.

    This is one of those cases where we are REALLY glad we had a pro do the tile. The FP tile is made of abalone shell pieces. Very uneven stuff. My wife really knows how to find the, um, unusual. It gave the tile guy fits, but looks great now.


    Here's what it looks like now:

    Click image for larger version. 

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    I'm going to finish the top half with a mantle and wood. My questions today have to do with attaching the mantle. We like the look of a floating shelf. The current plan is to install several of these 'blind shelf supports' from Rockler:
    http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?p...7&site=ROCKLER

    They would be attached using 'Tapcon' screws.

    Then a nice piece of 8/4 hard maple will be attached.

    I'm also considering using steel rod (or threaded rod, for better grip), inserted in holes drilled into brick.

    Do you think there is an advantage to either system? If you would use the steel rod, how would you anchor it in the brick? Epoxy?

    Same question about anchoring into the wood. Epoxy, construction adhesive??

    Thanks in advance...

  8. #8
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    Bump!

    So no one has an opinion on post #7? There have been over 350 views. Don't be shy, let me know what you think!!

  9. #9
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    If it was me I would go with the threaded rod and use epoxy on both the brick and wood.
    Oh wait it is me that's exactly what is on the schedule for next week. Attach floating rock mantle to brick above wood stove to keep the stove from melting the TV again.
    Some people just don't listen. We told them that putting the TV up there was a bad idea.
    Last edited by Chuck Thoits; 04-08-2012 at 07:49 PM.
    It could be worse You could be on fire.
    Stupid hurts.

  10. #10
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    Dec 2006
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    Chuck,

    Can you recommend an epoxy? Something I might be able to find at HD or Lowes.

    Thanks.

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