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Thread: I LOVE my Roubo Workbench!

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Tokyo Japan
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    15,806

    I LOVE my Roubo Workbench!

    I'm still plugging away on the humidor, but on Sunday I had a bit of a "Honey to do List" rush order. We have a spot on our kitchen counter that is a real waste of space, and as our kitchen is small to start with, well I had to make a little shelf kind of thing that will help.

    It is nothing much, but it has to look nice and be durable. There will not be a lot of weight on the shelf, so I made it without a back, it is all jointed together with dados, and should be fine.


    Now I just need to do some sanding and then put a finish on it.

    To cover the edges of the plywood, I use some thin strips of hardwood, I put them on then I use a sharp #4 hand plane to bring everything flush, this works really well, but to make it even easier, I put the whole shelf in the leg vice on my bench and then a clamp to the sliding deadman. the shelf is held ROCK SOLID and this makes the hand planing fun!




    (The top of the shelf goes right up against the bottom of the upper cabinet, so you won't see the end of the side piece of plywood, that you can see now)

    The one shelf is adjustable, and I wanted to put the half holes in the underside of the shelf so the shelf registers on the pins.

    I dunno how your guys do this but this is what I do.....







    If I had a whole bunch to do, maybe I'd make some kind of a jig to use the router, but for just the one, this works.

    Now on to sanding......

    Man I love that workbench, it sure was worth the time, money and effort to make it!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
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    Bellingham
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    2,449
    Quote Originally Posted by Stuart Ablett View Post
    Man I love that workbench, it sure was worth the time, money and effort to make it!
    I understand!
    “When love and skill work together, expect a masterpiece.” - John Ruskin
    “Nowadays people know the price of everything and the value of nothing.” - Oscar Wilde

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Oak Harbor Washington on Whidbey Island
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    3,134
    Good looking shelf Stu. That material looks more like lumber core than plywood. Hmmm recesses for shelf pins, must have been built in Stu's Custom Dungeon Shop.
    "Forget the flat stuff slap something on the spinny thing and lets go, we're burning daylight" Bart Leetch
    "If it ain't round you may be a knuckle dragger""Turners drag their nuckles too, they just do it at a higher RPM"Bart

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Satko View Post
    I understand!
    I knew you would!

    Quote Originally Posted by Bart Leetch View Post
    Good looking shelf Stu. That material looks more like lumber core than plywood. Hmmm recesses for shelf pins, must have been built in Stu's Custom Dungeon Shop.
    You are correct, it is lumber core, I hate the stuff, but it is the best I can get here for even stupid prices.
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Cape Cod, Ma.
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    1,553
    Nice Stu!
    He who laughs last, thinks slowest

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    No, not all of SoCal is Los Angeles!
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    9,076
    Ah, the joys of doing something for others in our well equipped man-caves. Well done Stu and congrats on the growing relationship with that fine workbench.
    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
    - Arthur C. Clarke

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Nova Scotia, 45°N 64°W
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    1,243
    Nice little project Stu, and high grade workmanship as usual. That bench is sure earning it's keep.

    Now, I'm looking at how you've laid out the dog holes and haven't quite figured out your rationale there, relative to the vise location. We need to have a discussion about that next time

  8. #8
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Rideout View Post
    Nice little project Stu, and high grade workmanship as usual. That bench is sure earning it's keep.

    Now, I'm looking at how you've laid out the dog holes and haven't quite figured out your rationale there, relative to the vise location. We need to have a discussion about that next time
    I use the dog hole with the face vice I have on the end of the work bench, or just with the holdfasts.

    When you coming next?
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    St. Louis, MO
    Posts
    583
    Nice bench Stu. I've been thinking about one of those for a few years now. You've already gotten quite a "patina" on yours. I'm pretty sure i'll be building one of those in the next couple of years. Now that you've been using it for a bit, any thing you'd do differently?
    By the way, i'm digging the leg vise.
    paulh

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Tokyo Japan
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    Yeah a couple of things, one is I'd make the very bottom of the leg vice a good inch off the floor, the way I have it, I have to cut out a section of the mats I have on the floor to allow it to work. Second thing is I'd not bother with the cross pins through the top of the leg into the bench, waste of time, once these legs are driven home and gravity sets in, they will never move, IMHO

    Also I left the wood as thick as possible for fewer glue joints, this worked, but made extra work, if I did it again, I'd still buy the large timbers, but I'd cut them down so that I could easily make the leg joints using the circular saw, much easier and a much more consistent piece of work.

    Other than those two, not much, take your time with your dog holes, they can be added at anytime.
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

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