Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 32

Thread: 30 hours working on a hickory bow -then crack -UPDATE

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario, CANADA
    Posts
    2,332

    Unhappy 30 hours working on a hickory bow -then crack -UPDATE

    Yesterday afternoon, I was in the final stages of completing a hickory bow. The stage that I was at is called tillering. Tillering is an iterative activity where stretches the bow using a tiller board, then removes the bow and removes a bit of material off the front surface with a cabinet scraper, then stretches the bow again, then removes some more material, etc. etc.Here is a photo of my bow being tillered:Click image for larger version. 

Name:	hickory bow being bent using a tiller board.JPG 
Views:	109 
Size:	110.9 KB 
ID:	65088Here it is being scraped:Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Hickory bow being scraped.JPG 
Views:	101 
Size:	73.8 KB 
ID:	65089About 15 minutes after that photo was taken and a couple of iterations later, as I was pulling the string down into another notch on the tiller board, there was a dreaded CRACK sound then silence. A spot on the back surface of the bow had come apart:Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Hickory bow with cracked surface area.JPG 
Views:	109 
Size:	67.0 KB 
ID:	65090The cracked material is on the surface and not all the way through but that has destroyed the integrity of the growth rings that dictate the shape of the bow and the bow is useless. It cannot be repaired. I am unhappy and my grandson Ethan, who helped me work on the bow in some of the earlier stages, is going to be even more unhappy when I tell him after I pick him up at school this afternoon.
    Last edited by Frank Pellow; 03-13-2012 at 11:37 AM.
    Cheers, Frank

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Delton, Michigan
    Posts
    17,475
    there are other woods that are more suited to making bows frank. osage is one of the better ones. and maple works to
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
    One hand washes the other!
    Don't put off today till tomorrow!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Central NY State
    Posts
    3,374
    Bummer Frank. The craftsmanship of risk rises again, to laugh at us.
    If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario, CANADA
    Posts
    2,332
    Larry, here in Canada, hickory seems to be the favoured wood. I was told by the fellow who taught me how to make a bow that hickory is good but that both yew and osage are better. In his opinion, hickory is better than maple and is the best local wood for the job.

    Yew and asage do not grow in Canada, hickory does and my stave came from an Ontario farmer's bush lot. Other staves from the same tree have worked well for other people.

    I am attaching a photo of another hickory stave that I have in my shed and will use some day (after I recover).

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Making a bow 01 -An almost finished hickory bow beside a hickory stave -small.jpg 
Views:	58 
Size:	19.8 KB 
ID:	65091

    Cheers, Frank

  5. #5
    That's really too bad, it always hurts to lose all that time and effort. Maybe a silver lining can be a lesson of determination and resolve to not quit? It's a bummer though...

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    GTA Ontario Canada
    Posts
    12,264
    Sorry to hear this Frank. I know Exotic woods out in Burlington had some yew staves at one time.

    Sent from my MB860 using Tapatalk
    cheers

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Delton, Michigan
    Posts
    17,475
    i know that the tillering is where it happens the most and usually right at the end where you need just alittle more.. you make more than one to get one almost always..
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
    One hand washes the other!
    Don't put off today till tomorrow!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    No, not all of SoCal is Los Angeles!
    Posts
    9,077
    Endeavor to persevere Frank. Bummer on the setback. Good practice for the next one . . . that was an attempt at a "silver lining" sort of thing.
    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
    - Arthur C. Clarke

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Reno NV
    Posts
    13,363
    That's got to be frustrating...

    Can't wait to see the next one completed!
    Programmer - An organism that turns coffee into software.
    If all your friends are exactly like you, What an un-interesting life it must be.
    "A door is what a dog is perpetually on the wrong side of" Ogden Nash


  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Amherst, New Hampshire
    Posts
    10,604
    That just plain stinks
    Faith, Hope & Charity

Similar Threads

  1. Crack filling question
    By larry merlau in forum General Woodworking Q&A
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: 02-28-2013, 09:52 AM
  2. Repairing a Crack in a Guitar Top
    By Dan Mooney in forum General Woodworking Q&A
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 11-09-2012, 06:19 PM
  3. Another crack thread
    By Rennie Heuer in forum General Woodworking Q&A
    Replies: 30
    Last Post: 03-21-2009, 04:40 PM
  4. PM Messaging system !!!Update Seems to be working now!!
    By Rob Keeble in forum Site Questions and Test Posts
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 03-03-2009, 08:28 PM
  5. Fix for a crack
    By Tony Falotico in forum General Woodturning Q&A
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 07-30-2007, 07:09 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •