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Thread: Spraying Lacquer or Poly

  1. #1
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    Spraying Lacquer or Poly

    My question is how does everyone go about spraying finishes especially lacquer if you can't open the doors? My doctor told me to wear the mask when I go in for a couple of days after spraying. I needed to spray some lacquer the other day. It was cold, snowing and blowing. I used a 3M half face respirator for spraying. That works but it leaves such a smell in the room. I thought about a exhaust fan but lacquer is so volitale that I woud be concerned with using like a bathroom exhaust fan because the motor could cause sparks. I was hoping I could just go out with like a 4" pvc pipe. This would be for doing just small turning projects. Just curious. Thanks.
    Bernie W.

    Retirement: Thats when you return from work one day
    and say, Hi, Honey, Im home forever.

    To succeed in life, you need three things: a wishbone, a backbone and a funnybone.

  2. #2
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    Bernie when i'm just spraying a turning i don't give it any thought, just spray and walk out for a bit. come back and do it again. Heck i don't even use a mask. Now after saying all that, when i spray a large project that's a different story.i try to what till i can spray out side and then i'll still where a mask. As far as the smell, i guess i've smoked to many years, as my smeller isn't very good.

  3. #3
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    Have you considered using a waterborne finish? They've come a long way over the past few years, and now rival the solvent based stuff. Might take a few minutes longer to dry/cure, but they're (fire/explosion) safer and definitely lower the fume breathing hazard.
    Jim D.
    Adapt, Improvise, Overcome!

  4. #4
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    Thanks guys. I am considering it Jim. My doc says I am not to be smelling that stuff and I have no way to exhaust it now. I am going to woodcraft maybe this weekend and hoping to pic up a couple of cans to try. I think the Enduro-var, GF Polycrylic and the High Performance Poly. We will see.
    Bernie W.

    Retirement: Thats when you return from work one day
    and say, Hi, Honey, Im home forever.

    To succeed in life, you need three things: a wishbone, a backbone and a funnybone.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bernie Weishapl View Post
    Thanks guys. I am considering it Jim. My doc says I am not to be smelling that stuff and I have no way to exhaust it now. I am going to woodcraft maybe this weekend and hoping to pic up a couple of cans to try. I think the Enduro-var, GF Polycrylic and the High Performance Poly. We will see.
    Enduro (General Finishes) comes as a WB lacquer, too. I've been using it lately, and like it a lot. I got the first gallon after Jeff Jewitt (Homestead Finishing) recommended it to me. He actually prefers it over the Target 6000 product which has sorta been state-of-the-art (for waterbornes) until now. Not sure whether Woodcraft carries the lacquer, or not.

    The GF Polycrylic sprays well, too.

    I use a small HVLP gun for both, with a 1.2mm tip.
    Jim D.
    Adapt, Improvise, Overcome!

  6. #6
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    I'm using J.E. Moser WB Lacquer for most of my current project. So far, I've been very pleased with the results - flattens well and virtually no odor. I sprayed it straight from the can with a gravity-fed HVLP gun.

    I set up an exhaust system using my old 1.5hp DC motor/impeller. It's on a shelf in the corner with some duct coming back over the area where I spray. It works quite well - especially when I remember to open a window for supply air!
    Bill Arnold
    Citizen of Texas residing in Georgia.
    NRA Life Member and Member of Mensa
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  7. #7
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    I don't like being tied to a single product (like Target EM6000) but it is the only water based lacquer that I have found that has full burn in. The Enduro from General Finishes requires sanding between coats, so obviously doesn't burn in - it may be an excellent acrylic finish, but doesn't have the "required" burn in feature I expect from a lacquer.

    I am getting ready to refinish the last table I did with polycrylic.
    Charlie Plesums, Austin Texas
    (Retired early to become a custom furnituremaker)
    Lots of my free advice at www.solowoodworker.com

  8. #8
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    Thanks all. Charlie on the table with polycrylic did it not hold up or what was the problem? Just curious. Since I use these on turnings only what is the shelf life? Charlie do you need to sand or does it burn in good enough? I checked them out and quarts is the smallest they sell. That would probably last me 6 to 8 months or longer. I also saw on their site that they have a Super Clear 9000 poly that sounds pretty good.
    Last edited by Bernie Weishapl; 02-29-2012 at 02:59 AM.
    Bernie W.

    Retirement: Thats when you return from work one day
    and say, Hi, Honey, Im home forever.

    To succeed in life, you need three things: a wishbone, a backbone and a funnybone.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bernie Weishapl View Post
    Thanks all. Charlie on the table with polycrylic did it not hold up or what was the problem? Just curious. Since I use these on turnings only what is the shelf life? Charlie do you need to sand or does it burn in good enough? I checked them out and quarts is the smallest they sell. That would probably last me 6 to 8 months or longer. I also saw on their site that they have a Super Clear 9000 poly that sounds pretty good.
    RE: Polycrylic table... I had to go look at it to see why I didn't like the finish. This is a coffee table that was "put aside" for a while, and is now back in service. Thus wear is not the issue. It has the look of a too thin plastic coat... the grain comes through, but it doesn't have the great look of an oiled or rubbed finish. Yet it isn't smooth enough to have the "grand piano" gloss look. I suspect that adding more coats would just make it look like thicker plastic. Bottom line, my plan is to sand off the existing finish and respray with EM6000 lacquer or EM8000 conversion varnish.

    The EM6000 does burn in, so I do not need to sand between coats for adhesion. However, my usual sequence is one or two coats (or a sealer and one coat) then machine sand 400 grit to get a perfectly smooth base. Then build as many coats as required, then sand as the first step of the rub-out, or just lightly to perfect the surface before one final spray coat. The outside back of a bookcase may only have the sealer coats, just enough to feel good and keep dust from sticking. The inside back of a bookcase will never get any wear so may only have one or two build coats. The sides of a bookcase typically have about 3 build coats, since minimal wear. The shelves of a bookcase may have 4-5 build coats. If I am having an off day, I spray thinner coats and increase the number.

    RE: Shelf life: The shelf life of EM6000 is well over a year - although Target would never suggest it, I do have some satin 6000 that is several years old, and I am still comfortable using. Since I don't normally use satin (I can't remember why I bought it), I sometimes mix it with the Gloss that I buy in 5 gallon lots, to get semi-gloss.

    The conversion varnish EM8000 has a catalyst, so I do believe the nominal one year shelf life.

    I have used EM9300 Polycarbonate top coat. It went on well and looked great, and is very durable - the top of a counter in an auto repair shop - no visible scratches despite people sliding keys all day. However, it was not as chemical resistant as I expected, but that problem was traced to the water-based shellac that I used as a first coat.

    A summary of the Target Coatings that I regularly use is at www.solowoodworker.com/wood/targetcoatings.html

    I know lots of people have good results with polyurethane on furniture, but I have not. It is very hard (scratch resistant, great for floors) but it is also brittle. I put it on our breakfast table, and our son and his friends formed divots in the finish as they were growing up (and doing homework/play). I finally sanded it off and refinished. First with a Fuhr finish, that lasted less than a year before I took it off, then with Target. Thus I am a little gun-shy about any polyurethane type finish, even from Target. YMMV
    Charlie Plesums, Austin Texas
    (Retired early to become a custom furnituremaker)
    Lots of my free advice at www.solowoodworker.com

  10. #10
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    Thanks Charlie. I contacted Jeff at Target Coatings this morning and had a really nice talk with him. He told me most of his finishes shelf life is 18 months but have had guys tell him in well sealed can has been much longer. We talked woodturning and he put me in contact with a couple. Both of them like the EM6000 and the super clear 9000. Jeff also advised if I was going to use the EM6000 lacquer like WOP to get the retarder. He said to mix 1/3 distilled water, 1/3 EM6000 and about 10% to 20% retarder. He said it makes a great wipe on. So I think I am going to order the EM6000, Super Clear 9000 poly and the retarder. Oh and he also said either could be put on straight out of the can with foam brushes. He said both self leveled nicely. Thank you again Charlie for the great info. Oh and I am also going to get a pint of General Finishes High Performance Poly and Enduro-var. Should keep me busy for a day or two.

    Oh and Jeff also said that with the water based finishes if I use a airbrush to spray them that a airbrushing spray booth would work. He said it will catch most if not all of the over spray and exhaust anything else outside if I so desired. He thought that would work nicely with small turnings.
    Bernie W.

    Retirement: Thats when you return from work one day
    and say, Hi, Honey, Im home forever.

    To succeed in life, you need three things: a wishbone, a backbone and a funnybone.

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