Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 19 of 19

Thread: My first project - Coffee table

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    GTA Ontario Canada
    Posts
    9,567
    Larry took the words right out my mouth. I am a rookie too and if i could stain poplar and get that great finish i would be incredibly happy.
    Please share what you did Shawn.

    Great work beats Ikea any day of the week.

    Sent from my MB860 using Tapatalk
    Rob .....Alias John Wayne now Pasquinell da trapper.

    "forget the apples slap some bacon on a biscuit and lets go...

    We're burning daylight"

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Austin, Texas
    Posts
    1,015
    It looks great - I started with a coffee table, which I wish looked as good as yours.

    If those are truly breadboard ends, and the pegs in the ends are in oval holes, that is doubly amazing for a first project. Hopefully you attached the aprons to the breadboard end, so the grain is going in the same direction.

    I am concerned about the wood movement across the grain - I saw pictures on another forum a few years ago, where the cross braces, glued and screwed to the bottom of a table, tore the table apart as the wood shrank. It didn't have breadboard ends, but those will keep the ends of the boards aligned and pretty, but will not keep them from expanding and shrinking. Rule of thumb - count on at least 1/8 inch expansion and contraction in each foot of cross grain, and close to no change in the long grain. No amount of finish or glue will prevent that wood movement.

    Sorry to be such a wet blanket on your first project. It looks great.

    Now add a drawer!
    Charlie Plesums, Austin Texas
    (Retired early to become a custom furnituremaker)
    Lots of my free advice at www.solowoodworker.com

  3. #13
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Thomasville, GA
    Posts
    3,109
    Very nicely done, Shawn!
    Bill Arnold - Website - ShopCam
    Citizen of Texas residing in Georgia.
    Ignorance is only skin deep, but stupid goes all the way to the marrow!
    Live every day like it's your last, but don't forget to stop and smell the roses.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    SW Idaho
    Posts
    6,659
    Well done!
    “We all die. The goal isn't to live forever; the goal is to create something that will.” - Chuck Palahniuk
    Soon to have a web presence! www.reynoldswoodcraft.com (under construction - a long way from done)

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    ABQ and LA
    Posts
    26,261
    Nicely done, especially for a first table.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Oceanside, So. Calif. 5 mi. to the ocean
    Posts
    4,123
    That is a nice table. It will lead to many more pieces "That are better than Ikea." Enjoy the trip.

    Enjoy,

    JimB
    First of all you have to be smarter than the machine.
    VOTING MEMBER

  7. #17
    Shawn it turned out real well , the braceing underneath will do nicely in time too ................MB
    Usually Busier than a Cat In A sand Box : Arkansas Red Wolf & Razorbacks Fan

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    No, not all of SoCal is Los Angeles!
    Posts
    7,866
    Great start Shawn. Nice clean lines.
    Be excellent to each other. - Rufus

    Endevour to persevere.
    -Lone Watie, quoting the Secretary of the Interior


  9. #19
    Thanks for the comments guys, and Bro. It's a great feeling to have turned a pile of lumber into something that we use every day.

    I didn't know staining poplar was difficult until you guys mentioned it and I googled it, guess I got lucky. I don't know if I did anything out of the ordinary, but I'll tell you what I did. Once the table was put together, I took my detail sander with 150 grit (?) and ran it over the whole table to take off any imperfections. Then I put the stain on using a foam brush, and wiped it off after a few minutes with the disposable shop towels (blue paper towels from HD). I continued to wipe it off over the next few hours a couple more times to get most of the residue off. then I applied the polyurethane, sanded with 220 grit and added a second coat of poly.

    Charlie - Thanks for the info, wet blanket . I would have never thought of the expansion of the wood, it will come in useful in the future.
    So mote it be.

    http://www.SCAregalia.com - Masonic regalia and supply
    Save 10% with the code: BROTHER

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •