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Thread: Turning Bow Saw Build

  1. #1
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    Turning Bow Saw Build

    Started working on a new hand tool yesterday... A Turning Saw.

    This is a mock up for a nicer one but I'm sure it will be usable all the same. I went with an oak frame, 3/8" skip blade and aluminum pins to use as much as I could from what I already had on hand and keep the prototype cheap. I'll be going with Jute and a stick for tension

    Pictures pretty much say it all... Once I get it done I'll try to do an over view of the build but if any questions /critiques fire away!

    Still has A ways to go but not bad for 2.5 hrs I think. Hand machining the pins took the most time. Also I cheated and used my BS to cut the pieces... Maybe I'll use this saw to build the next one. I'm hoping to find some time to work on it tomorrow even if only to get the knobs turned.

    ~tom
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails image-2093410934.jpg   image-2357540130.jpg   image-1527189634.jpg   image-2475408215.jpg  

  2. #2
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    Very cool, Tom. Where to you get the blades for this type of saw?
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vaughn McMillan View Post
    Very cool, Tom. Where to you get the blades for this type of saw?
    From Joel
    “When love and skill work together, expect a masterpiece.” - John Ruskin
    “Nowadays people know the price of everything and the value of nothing.” - Oscar Wilde

  4. #4
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    Very nice Tom, i think you took the wise approach. Recently i had a go at mine after buying a kit of the pins and blades from Joel. I should have called it a prototype that would have helped me get over my own mistakes and mess.

    So lets just say i got my handles all turned and pins fitted for the next version of my saw. Incidently i used european beech. Its currently in the projects tofinish box.


    I really like your joint and the curve you managed on it. That must have taken some doing on oak endgrain.

    How did you do your pins. Do you have a metal lathe? I have in mind to make some of my own this summer since a buddy of mine has a metal lathe.


    Be interested to see your finished version. What material you gonna use to tension it?
    Rob .....Alias John Wayne now Pasquinell da trapper.

    "forget the apples slap some bacon on a biscuit and lets go...

    We're burning daylight"

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Keeble View Post


    What material you gonna use to tension it?
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Becnel View Post
    I'll be going with Jute and a stick for tension

    Great looking saw Tom
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  6. #6
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    Thanks, guys!

    yes, jute and a toggle that will fit a mortice on the stretcher.

    The blade is a piece of and old bandsaw resaw blade, I ground off the last few teeth at each end where they enter the pins.

    I made the pins by hand with a drill, hacksaw and files. Like I said, it's a prototype ideally I'd like tapered pins but without a metal lathe I'll have to stick with straight. I plan to turn the knobs with either a brass or copper end cap as a friction plate to reduce wear.

    The 'good' one will have a pecan frame and I expect that to survive the apocalypse!

    Thanks for looking.

  7. #7
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    Lookin' good Tom. And geetings from the other end of Big Muddy.

  8. #8
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    About 30 years ago I met the father of one of my bosses. He must of been in his 80's and spoke only Italian. He showed me a huge breakfront that he was just finishing. It was one of the most ornate and detailed pieces of furniture that I have ever seen. He had no power tools and used his bow saw for almost all the cuts. Amazing.

    Looks like yours is off to a great start
    So Mote It Be

  9. #9
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    i have to admit, I've never heard of a turning saw. How do you use it, and what is it for? It looks like a marvellous piece of work!

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis Ulrich
    Lookin' good Tom. And geetings from the other end of Big Muddy.
    Thanks! MN or Canada?

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Gibson
    About 30 years ago I met the father of one of my bosses. He must of been in his 80's and spoke only Italian. He showed me a huge breakfront that he was just finishing. It was one of the most ornate and detailed pieces of furniture that I have ever seen. He had no power tools and used his bow saw for almost all the cuts. Amazing.

    Looks like yours is off to a great start
    The more I see and learn the more I continue to learn that as machines got better craftsmanship got worse. There aren't many craftsman like those from the old days!

    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Tulk
    i have to admit, I've never heard of a turning saw. How do you use it, and what is it for? It looks like a marvellous piece of work!
    Rodger, all a turning saw is a bow saw which has a blade able to be turned. An old style fret/coping saw and the precursor to the modern band saw. By rotating the blade it makes it possible to make curved cuts and keep the frame out of the way. They can be tiny fret saws or giant resaw type saws.

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