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Thread: ? fer Mr. weyhauser--OSB

  1. #1
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    ? fer Mr. weyhauser--OSB

    i noticed the other day we had a fella that was from weyhauser "spellin wrong" but you can get he drift.. well i have question for him and any other person with knowlegd on the subject.. plywood has differnt grades and i see that the borgs are offering osb at some pretty reduced rates laty but my question is does it have differnt ratings so that we could get poorer quality? other than name of manufacture does it make it better than some others.. thask for the inightenement
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
    One hand washes the other!
    Don't put off today till tomorrow!

  2. #2
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    Constantine, MI
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    How's this for service?

    Larry,

    Find this and other helpful information at www.osbguide.com

    It Pays to Know Your OSB Grade Stamp

    To be sure you are getting the proper panel for the job, ensure you
    refer to the grade stamp on the panel. The stamp contains important
    information including specifications and code requirements that will
    assist you in selecting the right panel.

    Certification Agency
    The top of the stamp will bear the name of the agency certifying
    panels to performance standards recognized by all major North
    American building codes—the National Building Code (BOCA), the
    One and Two Family Dwelling Code (CABO), the Standard
    Building Code (SBCCI), the Uniform Building Code (ICBO), the
    International Building Code (ICC) and the National Building Code
    of Canada (NRCC). These codes recognize OSB for various
    applications, including single layer floors, roof sheathing, siding,
    soffits, subfloors, underlayment and wall sheathing. Panels are
    certified by three nationally accredited agencies: TECO, APA and
    PSI.

    Standards
    Below the name of the certification agency will be the name of the
    standard, for example PS 2. OSB panels are manufactured to meet
    performance criteria set by the U.S. Department of Commerce's PS 2
    Performance Standard for Wood-Based Structural-Use Panels. In
    Canada, panels must comply with the Canadian Standards
    Association's CSA O325 Construction Sheathing or CSA O437 OSB
    and Waferboard. All three standards set maximum values for
    deflection under load, dimensional stability, and minimum values for
    strength, stiffness and lateral nail loads.
    (more)


    Structural Grades and Dimensions
    One of three grades - Sheathing, Structural 1 Sheathing, and Single
    Floor - will be stamped. Sheathing is for use in construction
    applications, such as covering material for roofs, subfloors and
    walls. Structural 1 Sheathing is a sheathing panel that meets
    additional requirements for cross-panel strength and stiffness. Single
    Floor is for use as a combination subfloor and underlayment. Next to
    the grade will be numbers for panel thickness and span rating,
    indicating allowance for roof and floor spacing respectively.

    Bond Durability Classification
    One of two exposure categories – Exterior or Exposure 1 -
    determines where panels can be used. Exterior panels, fully
    waterproof, are designed for permanent exposure to the weather.
    Most OSB panels are classified as Exposure 1, suitable for panels
    that are not permanently exposed to the weather that must resist
    effects of high humidity and moisture during construction delays.
    To order OSB panels, the specifier or builder should designate
    thickness, trademark grade, span rating, bond durability
    classification, dimensions, "square edge" or "tongue-and-groove" as
    desired for thicker panels and number of pieces. One glance at the
    certification stamp will confirm key requirements.

    ###

    For additional information about OSB, contact the Structural Board
    Association at (416) 730-9090, fax (416) 730-9013 or e-mail

    info@osbguide.com
    . The SBA Web site (www.osbguide.com) is

    another excellent resource.


    “We all die. The goal isn't to live forever; the goal is to create something that will.” - Chuck Palahniuk

  3. #3
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    Michigan
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    Well boss...Rennie answered this sooooo much better than I could have attempted to.....way to go Rennie.
    A very wise man once said.......
    "I'll take my chances with Misseurs Smith and Wesson. "

  4. #4
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    Nov 2006
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    Delton, Michigan
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    ok so i have read the litturchur

    now, if it can be said creativly. are the other places selling lesser quality for the low dollar, in reguards to a higher priced establishment in your opinion?
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
    One hand washes the other!
    Don't put off today till tomorrow!

  5. #5
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    Location
    Michigan
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    I am going to try to get my thoughts across on this Larry.

    I often am contracted to do the labor only on a building, the customer has shopped around got the cheapest deal on their package and just wants a licensed builder to do the work...no problem. OSB is 4'x8' all day long, any of it will work.

    When I am contracted to also purchase the materials I go to my local mom and pop lumber yard who happen to sell " a very good name brand" I prefer to use the "name brand" they sell because I find that it will hold up better during the construction process. Example: The "name brand" stuff on a floor seems to handle the abuse of all the subs walking on it, drywallers spilling water on it, the typical wear and tear involved during the job. When I have used the "cheaper" stuff at the BORG, I find it will flake easier and not stand up to the traffic involved in building a home as well as the "name brand" If my name is going to be on the job as the general contractor...I want the good stuff, if I am hired as the framer...then the homeowner has to look at themselves for any problems in the quality of material.

    Will the cheap stuff work for the average do it yourselfer working on his own project? Yeah, it works for the pro too, but it in my opinion and use in the field for 18 years find that the better "name brand" stuff will hold up better. It seems the glue, fibers, chips all hold together better in the long run.

    ....as always....your mileage may vary.
    A very wise man once said.......
    "I'll take my chances with Misseurs Smith and Wesson. "

  6. #6
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    I bow to Steve's vast experience in this area (as my own experience is limited to the occasional "project" as far as OSB is concerned).

    Larry - Sorry if I misunderstood your original question, but I hope the information provided was helpful none-the-less.

    As for the name brand stuff, well, of course I think ours is right up there . But.... you really can't go wrong going with any of the 'big boys' in this field.

    Last but not least, here's a spelling helper - just remember the vowels in Weyerhaeuser are in order (remember AEIOU?).
    “We all die. The goal isn't to live forever; the goal is to create something that will.” - Chuck Palahniuk

  7. #7
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    Delton, Michigan
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    OK rennie

    Two points fer you.. my finners dont do as we as me brain and sometimeds they both do poorly
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
    One hand washes the other!
    Don't put off today till tomorrow!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
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    Good spelling advice Rennie, I'll remember to double check that the next time I place an order at my local Mom and Pop lumber yard.
    A very wise man once said.......
    "I'll take my chances with Misseurs Smith and Wesson. "

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