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Thread: Beginning custom color

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Escondido, CA
    Posts
    5,172

    Beginning custom color

    OK, I have received the Transtint that Dave suggested a few weeks ago. I am ready to start playing mad chemist. I also got the color chart.

    I like to have things at hand, so I bought a measuring cup and a set of funnels just for mixing colors. Hit the Dollar store so it was inexpensive. I think I will get a spare can or two from HD.

    I know I need to carefully record the recipes as I mess around.

    Now a couple of questions for you more experienced chemists. I think I can mix into alcohol, water, sanding sealer, shellac, lacquer, or perhaps even varnish for the color carrier. Final finish will be NC Lacquer because I have some. I am aiming for a cinnamon color on BB ply.

    1. Should I apply wood conditioner (blotch control) first?
    2. Any preface for the color carrier?
    3. What is the protocol in terms of order? I.e., conditioner, sealer with color, final finish? Or, conditioner, color, sealer, final finish? Or?

    Go for it! I need all the help I can get. The project at hand is the bookcase I began a few weeks ago and then decided to get the color and finish on the inside before assembly. Books are stacked in boxes so I want to get this project DONE!
    ++++++

    Some say the land of milk and honey; others say the land of fruits and nuts. All together my sort of heaven.

    Power is not taken. It is given. Who have you given yours to? Hmmmm?

    Carol Reed

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Lindale, TX
    Posts
    84
    You can in fact, mix the Transtint into all the things you listed. I'd suggest lacquer thinner or paint thinner as a carrier. Water will raise the grain. How are you applying the final finish. If you are spraying, adding a bit of toner to your mix is a great way to bring it up to final color. This way you can stain lighter which helps a ton with blotching. I do this instead of using a wood conditioner because, in my opinion, it keeps the character of the wood. The areas that blotch are the areas that do the most interesting things under lacquer. If you get blotching, use a little lacquer thinner on a rag and scrub the blotchy areas to remove color.

    So...my normal regimen is:

    Stain
    Scrub if needed
    Sealer coat
    Maybe glaze if an antique finish is wanted
    Sand
    Toner coats
    Clear gloss (2 coats)
    Sand
    Final coat
    Maybe rub out

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    RETIRED(!) in Austintown, Ohio
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    5,321
    For your "Mad Scientist" mixing kit, might I suggest adding a 10cc hypodermic syringe? (I get mine in the veterinary section at Tractor supply.)

    A syringe makes measuring the Transtint for mixing small amounts very easy. There are ~30cc in an ounce, and Transtint 'standard' strength is one ounce per quart of carrier, so using 7½cc from the syringe make a nearly perfect half pint of dye.

    The syringe, with a 1½" needle, makes the mixing a lot less messy than with a dropper or pipette.
    Jim D.
    Adapt, Improvise, Overcome!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Escondido, CA
    Posts
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    Thanks, Jim. That is a wonderful suggestion. No Tractor Supply stores in this state, but I will check at the feed store. It is pretty well stocked.

    Now I need to do a chart for various amounts of dye. Your measuring information for a half pint is very helpful. I think I want to mix a pint for the bookshelves. I think that will be enough. What I don't want is leftovers. Don't like them in my refrigerator either!

    Any thoughts about the color wheel? I think I have figured it out. We will see.
    ++++++

    Some say the land of milk and honey; others say the land of fruits and nuts. All together my sort of heaven.

    Power is not taken. It is given. Who have you given yours to? Hmmmm?

    Carol Reed

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    No, not all of SoCal is Los Angeles!
    Posts
    9,076
    I use metric when playing mad scientist. It makes my weak math skills seem so much better. I generally start with about an ounce (30ml) of carrier. I prefer DNA as it doesn't raise the grain and leaves no residue but, it dries too fast for some folks taste. I then just count drops of Transtint straight from the bottle into a small measuring spoon (in case I "over-drip" the amount I am after). Add the dye to the carrier, mix well and make my test patch. I use a piece of the same material with the same preperation protocol for my test board. I try to make my test patches at least 4" x6" and leave a good gap between different patches. I mark the patches off with an indelible marker and use the gaps between to document the patch. Kind of like:

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Once I have the small batch formula I like, I just multiply by the number of ounces (or ml) needed.
    Last edited by glenn bradley; 04-26-2012 at 04:38 PM.
    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
    - Arthur C. Clarke

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Delton, Michigan
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    carol which color wheel did you get and where?
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
    One hand washes the other!
    Don't put off today till tomorrow!

  7. #7
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    Mar 2007
    Location
    Escondido, CA
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    @Larry
    http://www.woodfinishersstore.com/pr...olorwheel.html

    They also had the very best prices on Transtint dyes. They are a Vista, CA company (near my ol' stomping grounds) and I have seen the presentations they do at local woodworking clubs. Good people.
    ++++++

    Some say the land of milk and honey; others say the land of fruits and nuts. All together my sort of heaven.

    Power is not taken. It is given. Who have you given yours to? Hmmmm?

    Carol Reed

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    No, not all of SoCal is Los Angeles!
    Posts
    9,076
    Carol links to one of the color wheels I have Larry. Pretty handy and not expensive. I keep mine in a zippy-bag in a cabinet since I only need it now and again but, when I do, I do ;-)
    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
    - Arthur C. Clarke

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Delton, Michigan
    Posts
    17,472
    thanks for the tip glenn,, i think i am gonna need to be more color coordinated soon so was looking for something to help me get that way,, i have heard of folks using blue or green to get matched color and i never looked at wood that way pictures yes but not wood
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
    One hand washes the other!
    Don't put off today till tomorrow!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Outside the beltway
    Posts
    5,255
    Carol I do hope your enjoying playing with color. Much of the time I will add tints to sealer then once I achieve the color ill apply 2-3 coats of sealer over that.
    I dream a lot. I do more painting when I'm not painting. It's in the subconscious.
    ::: Andrew Wyeth :::
    colonialrestorationstudio.com

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