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Thread: sons kitchen updates

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
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    new york city burbs
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    were looking at the 18 inch ge dishwashwer that matches his stove and microwave.
    I can build out the wall and support the counter and all will be fine.(Im waiting on someone who knows this stuff to give a look and suggest something to me, he might stop by later this week and look at it)

    I made some face frames this morning, but had to run to his house to double check the angled one ,Sure enough, I forgot to allow for the 1/4 cherry ply on the sides, so its a good thing.

    I milled up 2 inch strips, 4 bf worth, and they were all no good. I managed to cut out a few smaller pieces, seems my jointer was so clogged it didnt give me straight surfaces.

    Ok, Ill save 2 bf worth.

    I started making the first door as I had some extra stiles already made, and I fed it too fast, chipped out 2 rails, so I decided, thats enough today. Not a productive day.

    I picked up 2 sheets of birch ply, did not want to drive 35 miles each way to get prefinished.(theres alot of leg work invovled, takes up a good portion of my days. Spent most of the day in the car)

    That adds on 86 dollars to the cost. Im up to 900 dollars spent so far.
    Last edited by allen levine; 04-30-2012 at 07:23 PM.
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  2. #12
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    Mar 2008
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    new york city burbs
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    my very sophisticated shelf pin jig.

    I didnt go nuts drilling holes all the way to top or bottom.

    problem Im running into, is that I have so little space to keep doors/panel glue ups, so Im forced to work on single pieces at a time. Im trying to do all steps together, like rout profiles on stiles/rails and all at once, run long pieces etc....but keeping all the pieces laying around, trying to build cabinets, there just isnt enough room.
    Gonna really slow up the progress.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails kitchen reface 004 (Medium).jpg   kitchen reface 002 (Medium).jpg  
    Last edited by allen levine; 05-02-2012 at 04:27 PM.
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  3. #13
    Join Date
    May 2007
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    Kansas City, Missouri
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    Nice work, I've used pegboard many times for that now, works very well.
    Darren

    A determined soul will do more with a rusty monkey wrench than a loafer will accomplish with all the tools in a machine shop. Robert Hughes (1938-2012), Australian art critic

  4. #14
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    Mar 2008
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    new york city burbs
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    IM going to unbolt my mitre saw and have to drag it along with me soon, as well as get my hands on a portable ts so I can do some trim work. I can use my track saw, but small pieces will trim better on a ts.
    Not sure who I know has one, so Im going to have to start asking around.
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  5. #15
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    Mar 2008
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    new york city burbs
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    progressing very slowly.
    Not too sure why, but my body isnt being nice to me lately, so Ive only been getting in a few hours a day.
    Glued up and planed 8 panels, 6 for doors, 2 for a side of a cabinet.
    Made alot of stiles, finished some more face frames and some door frames.

    This is what the cabinet you see when you walk into the kitchen will look like from the side.Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	67234 I will attach the raised panels from the inside of the cabinet.
    There will be crown molding up on top, eventually Im going to have to learn how to cut it, because that is a very weak spot for me, and my only attempt at crown molding ended up me buying corner blocks to bypass all the angle work.
    But I will learn.
    Nothing is glued or sanded yet in these pics.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails kitchen reface 019 (Medium).jpg  
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  6. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Painesville Ohio
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    130
    Quote Originally Posted by allen levine View Post
    progressing very slowly.
    Not too sure why, but my body isnt being nice to me lately, so Ive only been getting in a few hours a day.
    Glued up and planed 8 panels, 6 for doors, 2 for a side of a cabinet.
    Made alot of stiles, finished some more face frames and some door frames.

    This is what the cabinet you see when you walk into the kitchen will look like from the side.Click image for larger version. 

Name:	kitchen reface 020 (Medium).jpg 
Views:	44 
Size:	23.9 KB 
ID:	67234 I will attach the raised panels from the inside of the cabinet.
    There will be crown molding up on top, eventually Im going to have to learn how to cut it, because that is a very weak spot for me, and my only attempt at crown molding ended up me buying corner blocks to bypass all the angle work.
    But I will learn.
    Nothing is glued or sanded yet in these pics.
    Cutting crown is easy. Make up a rt angle jig set the jig on your mitre box. Set the crown molding in the jig just the way its going to be installed. Cut it with just one angle like you would do flat trim. They sell a jig for it but why buy it when 2 pieces of scrap ply will work well. Make sure your jig is as tall as your crown sitting at a angle.
    "Its only by minute attention to every detail that you will achieve perfection"

    http://westernreservefurniture.com/

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    new york city burbs
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    2 neighbors down from me, is a home improvements contractor, who showed me how to cut the crown a while back.
    A few weeks later, he dug up the rockler jig he had(he never used it) for cutting crown, and gave it to me as a gift.
    I think I just have to take a couple of minutes and practice with some crown and get the hang of it.
    Before I attempt to cut any moldings out of cherry, Im going to try some pine first to practice both making it and cutting it to install.
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  8. #18
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    Mar 2008
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    new york city burbs
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    not including the 2 new bits I purchased, or the new featherboards(I consider them supplies, secondary costs), I spent another 75 bucks on 2 sheets birch, so that brings me to close to 1000.00 so far.
    I believe Ill need a few more sheets, and if Im successful spraying, another 50 bucks worth of finish.
    Might need a bit more cherry, but I wont purchase it until I run out.
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  9. #19
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
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    new york city burbs
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    after staining up a whole bunch of doors,and repairing what damage I saw, I noticed 2 things.
    On one door one of the pieces I used has completely different coloration, and took the stain differently and is very dark, noticable.
    On another door, a knot that I glued in, eventually came out, cracked apart, so I epoxied in a mixture of sawdust and epoxy and it filled in ok, not perfect. but I did have another small chip out near that k not, on the raised part of the panel, so now I have 2 doors Im not thrilled with.(not disasters though)Im sure more stain and some finish coats will soften the problems, or maybe not. the stain is still damp, and its only the first coat.

    so my wife addressed the 2 doors this morning and explained to me what she thinks I should do.

    let the client see it, and tell him he has 3 options:

    1.You ordered a natural product. Wood is a natural product and I cant control its color or defects. If you want perfectly smooth unnatural like looking doors, order a different type like plastic or painted plywood doors.
    2.I can take off 10% of the cabinet that the doors are on.
    3. I can remake the doors, but that will add on 4 months more wait time since the shop is machined for alternate setups and different work now(making cabinets, not doors)

    I like her.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails kitchen reface 022 (Medium).jpg   kitchen reface 023 (Medium).jpg   kitchen reface 024 (Medium).jpg  
    Last edited by allen levine; 05-12-2012 at 04:22 PM.
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  10. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Floydada, Tx
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    Cherry is one of those woods that has that problem. I always ask the client how they want the look to be. If they want the wood uniform I will use all the wood from one tree. This is the only way to try and keep the color close. Only other option is to go darker, but then in time they will still change color and show like that. For me they look fine and they should be happy to have them .

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