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Thread: Lesson learned, I think...

  1. #1
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    Lesson learned, I think...

    I needed to cut a 3/8" groove in some sassafras, and set up my router table to cut the groove 3/8" deep. As I pushed the board along, it made a lot of bumping noises, and after about 20" It wouldn't go any farther. I stopped the router, and had a look. There was smoke coming off the bit, and thegroove was clean on the forward side, but the rearward side looked like it had been cut with an axe. It was very rougn and bumpy. I couldn't touch the bit, as it was HOT. I pulled it with a pair of pliers, and it came out with a little difficulty. First lesson, I hadn't tightened the bit sufficiently. The bit was black and blue and the top of one of the carbide inserts was missing.

    I put in another bit, tightened it until it screamed (I have not used a ľ" adapter before; it had turned blue at the top. ) and tried again. It was still a little rough, so I cut the speed of the router, made two passes at half depth and then at full depth, and finally got a nice cut.

    This is with the Skil router I bought used over the winter. I never saw anything like this with my Mastercraft router in the table.I would not have thought that cutting a 3/8 x 3/8 groove would be a problem. Is there anything else I could have done wrong? I need to know if I missed anything so I can really screw it up next time.
    Cheers,
    Roger


    The other member of Mensa, but not the NRA

    Everyone is a self-made person.

    "The thing about quotes on the internet is that you cannot confirm their veracity" -Abraham Lincoln

  2. #2
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    3/8 x 3/8 is quite a pass in any wood. I always make multiple passes. Easier in the long run.
    If you don't take pride in your work, life get's pretty boring.

    Rule of thumb is if you donít know what tool to buy next, then you probably donít need it yet.

  3. #3
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    I hate to admit this, but something similar happened to me once - including the carbide loss. Turns out I'd put the wing cutter on the arbor shaft backwards...
    Jim D.
    Adapt, Improvise, Overcome!

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Southwood View Post
    3/8 x 3/8 is quite a pass in any wood. I always make multiple passes. Easier in the long run.
    +1. The rule of thumb I use is remove no greater profile area than 1/4" x 1/4" at a pass. I usually err on the under side so I would have done three skinny 1/8" grooves with a light pass as a final. YMMV.
    Last edited by glenn bradley; 05-05-2012 at 08:52 PM.
    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by glenn bradley View Post
    +1. The rule of thumb I use is remove no greater profile area than 1/4" x 1/4" at a pass. I usually err on the under side so I would have done three skinny 1/8" grooves with a light pass as a final. YMMV.

    I've messed up a few pieces in the past by trying to get it cut quickly. Now I do just as Glenn does. Takes longer but the results are great.
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  6. #6
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    roger, i am not sure if this happened to you or not but in some routers the bushing to accept the 1/4" shanks needs to be aligned with the slots of the collet to tighten properly..
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by larry merlau View Post
    roger, i am not sure if this happened to you or not but in some routers the bushing to accept the 1/4" shanks needs to be aligned with the slots of the collet to tighten properly..
    I wondered about some odd technicality like that. I will check it next time I change bits, but I have used four bits in it today without further mishap.
    Cheers,
    Roger


    The other member of Mensa, but not the NRA

    Everyone is a self-made person.

    "The thing about quotes on the internet is that you cannot confirm their veracity" -Abraham Lincoln

  8. #8
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    That would be better done with a stacked dado set. Most of my router bits are either 3 or 4 wings. This helps alot on the cutting.

  9. #9
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    I would've done it with a dado head as well. I'm also not a big fan of routers.
    "Do, or do not. There is no try."
    -Yoda



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