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Thread: Neander Stools

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    Central NY State
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    Neander Stools

    No, not something left behind in the back of the cave....

    I'm making a pair of white oak footstools. One is a wedding present, the other a Mother's Day gift for LOML. And yes she knows it's late. Actually it's a project we're both going to work on, as my wife is going to weave the Shaker webbing tops.

    Anyway, the parts are rived from my white oak log, [which is also making my Windsor chairs.]

    The photos show the progress from rived to squared [using drawknife and plane] and tapered. Then octagon, and finally a tapered round. I'm going to leave tool marks, rather than sand them completely smooth. I'm also planning to ebonize the oak, which should turn it a rather deep black.

    The rungs are now octagonal, and have been drying for about a week or more in my little kiln. More on them later.

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    If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
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    SW Minnesota
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    This will be fun to watch!!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
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    I like the rustic look, showing the tool marks.

    Quote Originally Posted by ken werner View Post
    The rungs are now octagonal, and have been drying for about a week or more in my little kiln. More on them later.
    I think I understand, the rungs need to be dryer so the legs will shrink around them, right? Will the seat need to be wetter than your legs or can you wedge them into the seat socket and get around that?

    I wish I had a nice old log of oak.
    “When love and skill work together, expect a masterpiece.” - John Ruskin
    “Nowadays people know the price of everything and the value of nothing.” - Oscar Wilde

  4. #4
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    Bill, the seats in this case will be Shaker tape - woven over a simple frame of rungs. In a Windsor, the seat is air dried, wetter than the very dry and tapered leg tenons, so it shrinks a little around the tenons, which are also wedged.

    Actually, a new log is better, easier to work. I'm so darn slow that the log is somewhat dry now though. I still have lots left. Best $80 I ever spent on wood. Here's what it looked like when I bought it, 2 years ago:
    http://familywoodworking.org/forums/...ught+some+wood
    If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
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    Bellingham
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    I looked back over your other chair build, but could not find any post on your kiln, have you shown it yet on the forum?

    I owe my wife a trip to NYC, where she has always wanted to go and where I lived and worked for a few years. How can I explain why we are flying out there but driving a U-Haul back, full of old tools and logs?
    “When love and skill work together, expect a masterpiece.” - John Ruskin
    “Nowadays people know the price of everything and the value of nothing.” - Oscar Wilde

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    Bill, I can't remember, so here it is. Made out of a shipping box - the one we shipped the chair bottom, all parts and tools home in. Insulated with 1/2" foil backed foam, and heated with a single 100 watt incandescent bulb. Gets to about 130 degrees

    .Click image for larger version. 

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    As for the Mrs., all the advice I can offer is to promise to make her whatever she wants. And if you get to NYC, I'm only a 5 hour detour away. You are always welcome.
    If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by ken werner View Post
    No, not something left behind in the back of the cave...
    Get out of my head, man! How did you know what I was thinking?

    Looking forward to watching this build.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  8. #8
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    Picking up where I left off...

    So, I left the rung parts in the kiln for several days, maybe two weeks, and today went back to work on them. The rungs shrank some, and had to be made 11/16 across the octagons. Some of the rungs shown in this picture are already rounded.
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    I made a simple 11/16 gauge, which also has 3 holes. Hole #1 is reamed on each end, and blackened with a pencil. You'll see why in a bit.
    It is important that the same bit is used for the gauge as will be used to drill the posts. Typically, an auger bit is 1/64 over. I have to confess, I am going to use a forstner bit and my drill press. Shame shame on me. Holes 2 and 3 are identical, and when #2 gets a bit worn [loose], we go to #3.

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    Here is the result:

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    Time for a little more spokeshave action. From octagon to nearly round. Keep rotating the piece, taking small bites. The shavings will be used later to pad the cushion, so I keep collecting them.
    Many are in little spirals.

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    Here's why the hole is widened and blackened. The graphite marks the high points for further removal.

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    A little sanding, using a narrow strip of 120 grit completes the task.
    The end result:
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Now, I did this 16 times, for one stool. 8 rungs, each with 2 ends.

    Next step will be boring the posts and assembling the frame.
    If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.

  9. #9
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    Man I wish I had the patience

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Cook View Post
    Man I wish I had the patience

    I was thinking the same thing Plus, I wish I had Ken's skill.
    Faith, Hope & Charity

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