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Thread: Chas started this so...

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
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    Chas started this so...

    Ok got my Dewalt chop saw Larry persuaded me to keep.

    Been using my table saw mostly since i discovered how to use it better.

    But Chas is doing some fine segment turning using his chop saw in such a manner that his accuracy has me coming back to ask.


    How do you get to set a chop saw so it cuts as accurate as Chas is getting. Am i correct to presume that a smaller blade chop saw is one of the starting points?


    Just finished a rush small project for a friends friend that involved making a replacement base for his front porch columns to stand on.

    What they did in this case which he just wanted a repeat of was take 2x4 cut 4 pieces and make 45degree cuts on them. Then nail em all together to form a square wide side down.

    Then take a piece of laminated 2x4 and cut a circle and place on top. I got asked to make it because the edge is profiled with a router both on the 2x4 and the round disc.

    I out splines in the joints and glued it up instead of nails the way it had been done. Its gonna be painted so i was not that worried by the gaps but its not the way i would have liked it to leave my shop. The guy was in a hurry and so was i what with the house and all.


    But now its time to get this right.

    Am i expecting too much from a slider shop saw.?

    I would have thought it was possible since trim guys use them for finish mouldings etc.

    I still think if one has the space to do the cut the table saw with decent mitre gauge is better but i see many of you making these chop saw tables so i thought i would ask and get some discussion going.

    Chuck you out there how do you do it?
    cheers

  2. #2
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    Rob, I use an adjustable drafting triangle to set up my saw. I can split degrees, like 22.5ļ for an octagon. I do not trust the scale on any saw. The fatter the line, the more room to guess at the 'right' angle. The adjustable drafting triangle makes my machine as precise as a Swizz watch.
    ++++++

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  3. #3
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    I, too, decided to get rid of my miter saw. Glenn talked me out of it. So I did make some "Kleenex" boxes using the saw. I was amazed (after the first one) how easy it was to set up to make the cuts accurately for the mitered corners.

    In order to compensate for microscopic error, I cut all of my "rights" first.
    Then I set up a stop block that was cut at a 45* angle so the "right" ends fit into a "V" instead of just resting against a 90* surface and cut the lefts for my end pieces.

    Then I adjusted the set up block for the length of the side pieces and cut the lefts for my side pieces.

    I hope I explained this so that you realize I had two settings for cutting "lefts." Half of the left cuts were for the short ends and half were for the longer sides. The boxes were not square, they were rectangles which caused two different lengths of sides (correct for a "Kleenex" box to fit into).

    THE BLADE ANGLE WAS NOT CHANGED, ONCE THE FIRST CUT WAS MADE.

    The reason for doing it that way was to compensate for any microscopic errors. To clarify this, let's say I was off 1/10th degree. One of my cuts would be too sharp by 1/10 degree; the other end would be too dull by exactly the same amount giving me a square corner.

    Enjoy,

    JimB

    p.s. I was not off 1/10th. That was for illustration purposes only. I did use a draftsman 45* triangle to set my miter saw angle because I don't trust the angles marked on saws in general. I want my corners to be exact. Exact corners are not difficult; it just takes a bit of care and the procedure above compensates for any microscopic errors.
    Last edited by Jim C Bradley; 07-07-2012 at 04:27 PM. Reason: clarification and additional info.
    First of all you have to be smarter than the machine.
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  4. #4
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    I bought a DeWalt miter saw used, intending to just use it as a rough chop saw. The previous owner had it precisely calibrated - not only the gauge, but the stops. I tried making miters with it, just swinging the saw to the left and right 45s (being careful to get them precisely in the stop, and tightening the lock in each position) and got textbook results. That miter saw can be calibrated, and it holds the calibration well.

    I use a stock 12 inch miter saw blade (about $70 Freud?) from Home Depot - paid more for the blade than I paid for the used saw, but it isn't a special super premium miter blade. Although occasionally I would like to cut more than the roughly 8 inch capacity, I am pleased to NOT have a sliding miter saw... just that much more to introduce play into the calibration.

    As with cutting any miter, be sure to take into account how the blade tries to pull the work along the fence. To compensate, I usually cut miters about 1/16" long, then make a final cut at the precise length, but since I am only removing the final 1/16" or so, the blade doesn't have much wood to pull, giving a better final miter cut.
    Charlie Plesums, Austin Texas
    (Retired early to become a custom furnituremaker)
    Lots of my free advice at www.solowoodworker.com

  5. #5
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    I have a 81/2" DeWalt SCMS. It is one of the most used tools in my shop. It was dead on accurate out of the box 6 years ago and is still perfect.
    It is able to be calibrated/adjusted if it becomes necessary. Maybe it keeps it's accuracy because I clean or blow it off after each use. No sawdust or wood chips to get lodged into spaces that may affect the saws accuracy

    Maybe I'm missing something but I don't understand the reasoning behind not having one or getting rid of one
    Faith, Hope & Charity

  6. #6
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    Couldn't live without mine either.
    If you don't take pride in your work, life get's pretty boring.

    Rule of thumb is if you donít know what tool to buy next, then you probably donít need it yet.

  7. #7
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    I don't have a slider and mine only a 10" DeWalt but if the CMS will do the cut it is my go to saw. Fast easy to set up and accurate as all get out. Ya just need to take a little time to make sure it is set up right and after that it repeats. I haven't touched the stops on mine in over 5 years since I move in to this shop. No I just need to figure out what I can cut with it and not have an allergic reaction... tried to do a little something last Tue. and have been regretting it since then...
    "Thereís a lot of work being done today that doesnít have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesnít have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Keeble View Post
    How do you get to set a chop saw so it cuts as accurate as Chas is getting.
    Rob,

    I have an SCMS of the brand several in this thread have mentioned. It's a fine saw, and I love it. I've built tons of outdoor projects with it, trim carpentry, shop stuff, you name it. But segments for turning? Not sure.

    Chas may get the kind of results you're talking about from his, but mere mortals like you and me? We'd have a better chance of untying the Gordian knot!

    I'm under the impression that many people who do segmented turning use a well-tuned sled on a very well tuned table saw. That may be the best way to go...

    Thanks,

    Bill

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Lantry View Post
    Rob,



    Chas may get the kind of results you're talking about from his, but mere mortals like you and me? We'd have a better chance of untying the Gordian knot!



    Bill
    Once again Bill you have caused me to look something up and learn a bit....thanks
    "Thereís a lot of work being done today that doesnít have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesnít have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
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    Tellico Plains, Tennessee
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    Rob,
    I don't use my chop saw for much other than chopping, but I watched a fellow down in Texas that made some incredible pen blanks on his chop saw... he cut some mighty thin pieces for his blanks. He use a very thin kerf blade, with a high teeth count... don't remember actual numbers on either, but it was amazing to watch his work that saw.

    It is on my to-do list to try a couple of his methods when I get around to it...
    Chuck
    Tellico Plains, TN
    https://www.etsy.com/shop/TellicoTurnings
    My parents taught me to respect my elders, but it's getting harder and harder to find any.
    If you go looking for trouble, it will usually find you.

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