Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13

Thread: Wooden Shop Floor

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Santa Claus, In
    Posts
    4,779

    Wooden Shop Floor

    Been doing a little shop design here and there. Finally got what I think might be a workable size. Now I am thinking about the floor. I want a wood floor. Tried of sore feet and back, after a day in the shop. I am looking real hard at the unfinished seconds from Lumber Liquidators. 89 cent a sq ft and would go well in a shop. Question is, how do I put it done, over the concrete. The pad will be poured level, with no drainage, so that issue is out. Thinking treated 2x4 16" on center, then 5/8" OSB, then the 3/4" floor. Is this over kill? It would get me little over 2 3/4" to run some electric in the floor. Guessing I would need vapor barrier before the 2x4?

    Ideas?
    If you don't take pride in your work, life get's pretty boring.

    Rule of thumb is if you donít know what tool to buy next, then you probably donít need it yet.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Boston, MA
    Posts
    145
    Hi Steve,

    I'll have to dig out the article, but I think FWW described a set up like this in their last "shops" issue (was around 2010 if I recall). If I recall, the article described using 2x4 sleepers (laid flat) to raise the floor off the concrete. I'll try to dig my copy out and check it for you.

    -Matt
    Measure with a micrometer, mark with chalk, cut with an axe.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Kansas City, Missouri
    Posts
    13,462
    To run the electric, sounds like your plan would work best. Could even shim where you need to make sure everything is perfectly level. I was looking at he dri-core stuff a while back, seems like it would be a good system too, but no ability to level it as needed.
    Darren

    To a small child, the perfect granddad is unafraid of big dogs and fierce storms but absolutely terrified of the word ďboo.Ē Ė Robert Brault

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    GTA Ontario Canada
    Posts
    12,264
    Steve I can only tell you what i did in my shop. 2x6 pressure treated 16" on center secured using blue tapcons. Then gaps filled with pink foam cut to size then vapour barrier poly over the top then 3/4 fir ply screwed into the 2x6's but joint but staggered.

    I wanted the insulated floor for efficiency in heating during winter and the softer landing on my feet.

    The one thing i would have seen to more care being taken is in the leveling dept. In my case this was part of a deal i struck with the supplier of the shed when the concrete floor did not turn out as i wanted. I had planned on putting down a woodfloor anyhow but i had hoped they would get it better than it is. Dont just rely on the wood thickness, if the concrete under that is not level the top will follow with weight of machines.

    I would also have insisted on more side to side 2x6 pieces. I think even using 2x8 would have been better or going for a double top skin like you suggesting with osb then 3/4"

    I aint a lightweight so its been great on my legs and cozy. But when i roll my table saw around i see the ply flexing and as an example my 14" delta bandsaw which has a metal enclosed base does not sit flat. I am fixing that now, lived with wedges for ages but the new mobile base and leveler feet are going to end this issue.

    My comparison is when i work in my garage like i did last year in the fall on my sons car boy i could feel the difference being out on the concrete for extended times versus my shop floor.
    cheers

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Oceanside, So. Calif. 5 mi. to the ocean
    Posts
    4,944
    Quote Originally Posted by Matt Ducar View Post
    Hi Steve,

    I'll have to dig out the article, but I think FWW described a set up like this in their last "shops" issue (was around 2010 if I recall). If I recall, the article described using 2x4 sleepers (laid flat) to raise the floor off the concrete. I'll try to dig my copy out and check it for you.

    -Matt
    Hi,

    If the wood is laid directly on the cement you will continue to have the sore feet, legs, etc. The reason a wood floor is easier on our bodies is because of the "give." In order for the wood to give it has to be fastened to something that gives, not a slab. The "Good ole' floors" with a crawl space underneath do the best job for comfort.

    Whatever you do, keep flexing, giving, etc. in mind. If it does not give, you do.

    Glenn and I have known several people (mainly neighbors) who put wood over concrete thinking it would be easier on their bodies only to find out it isn't so.

    Enjoy,

    JimB
    Last edited by Jim C Bradley; 07-11-2012 at 10:23 PM. Reason: spelling
    First of all you have to be smarter than the machine.
    VOTING MEMBER

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Oceanside, So. Calif. 5 mi. to the ocean
    Posts
    4,944
    Steve,

    You may be getting double jeoprady from me. I clicked "Edit" and my reply vanished.

    Short version: Wood floors are easier on you ONLY if they are allowed to flex. Wood fatenened to the concrete floor, does not flex. Therefore you get no improvement in comfort.

    The old fashioned wood floor with a crawl space under it is the best wood floor solution. The floor joists give some, the sub-floor gives some and the flooring itself gives some. (The house my folks built had no sub-floor. It had one-inch tongue and groove oak floor nailed ((Yes I said, 'Nailed.')) to the joists.). It is amazing how much improvement an infitesimal amount of flex gives.

    There are probably underlayments to go between concrete and wood on the market today. I just do not know; it just seems like there would be with today's technology.

    Just keep thinking, "If it does not give, I do."

    Enjoy,

    JimB
    Last edited by Jim C Bradley; 08-02-2012 at 07:05 PM. Reason: spelling
    First of all you have to be smarter than the machine.
    VOTING MEMBER

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    ABQ NM
    Posts
    30,020
    Jim, you bring up a good point, but they're talking about raising the wood floor off the concrete with 2x4 "sleepers" (think horizontal studs), so it will indeed have some flex.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Keeble View Post
    ..(snip) ...Then gaps filled with pink foam cut to size then vapour barrier poly over the top...()

    I wanted the insulated floor for efficiency in heating during winter and the softer landing on my feet...
    Steve, just curious, how much insulation are you putting under your slab before the pour?
    Last edited by Charlie Velasquez; 08-02-2012 at 10:10 AM.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Tokyo Japan
    Posts
    15,807
    How much headroom do you have?
    If you have enough head room, how much more would it cost you to put 2x6s on edge compared to 2x4s on the flat?

    If you put 2x6s on edge, you will gain a lot, more space for wiring changes down the road, you could even run one dust collection duct unter the floor, maybe not a full six inches, but you know that a DC duct does not need to be round right?

    I'd put my vapor barrier on the concrete slab, 6" overlaps and at least 6" up the walls, taped seams. Right now your slab may be dry, but in 10 years?

    Either way I'd bite the bullet and build a good floor over the slab, and be done with it, done right, it will out live you, done cheaply it will make you sorry for a very long time.

    I hate that I did not wait and put down a wooden floor in my Dungeon, I just simply hate the stupid decision I made, don't make the same mistake I did, build it right, you will be rewarded!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Santa Claus, In
    Posts
    4,779
    Charlie, no idea on the insulation, still planning.

    Stu, thinking 10-0 ceiling, so I could do an on edge type of thing.
    If you don't take pride in your work, life get's pretty boring.

    Rule of thumb is if you donít know what tool to buy next, then you probably donít need it yet.

Similar Threads

  1. Shop floor
    By ken lutes in forum Shop Tours
    Replies: 23
    Last Post: 02-14-2015, 01:01 AM
  2. Shop Walls and Floor
    By Allen Bryant in forum Carpentry and Construction
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 03-21-2014, 12:44 PM
  3. Thought on floating wood shop floor
    By Doug Sinjem in forum Carpentry and Construction
    Replies: 32
    Last Post: 11-22-2008, 07:52 PM
  4. Another 1,000 lbs added to shop floor...
    By Marty Walsh in forum New Tools
    Replies: 42
    Last Post: 12-06-2007, 12:52 AM
  5. Shop floor decision and Update
    By Ned Bulken in forum Carpentry and Construction
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 04-08-2007, 12:28 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •