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Thread: A bevy of swifts.

  1. #1
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    A bevy of swifts.

    I wasn't actually sure where to post this as it has flat work, hand work and spinny work I generally don't have many projects interesting enough to share, I figured this one might be sort of amusing (even if its not up to the standards of some of y'all, we're all learning). Lots of fiddly little pieces anyway (32 pieces of wood per swift plus a couple dozen pieces of metal).

    All done in oak (why oak? Because I have a lot of oak scraps, thats why ). Finished with 6 coats of wiping varnish and 2-3 coats of paste wax (depending on the part).

    The whole crew. Why make one when 4 only take twice as long.
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    Close up showing how the yarn goes around it. Allows it to be unwound without tangling (in theory).
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    The top part. The knobby bit is just compression fit to the top of the shaft. The shaft here is stepped down and the spinny bit is has a stepped hole inside to match. Both the shaft and the spinny bit have metal bearing surfaces (made from filed-to-fit washers) where they make contact with each other.

    This also shows how the arms are held to the spinny bits. Electrical wire in a groove and a little solder. There are actually 20 solder joints per swift including all of the arm-arm and arm-cross piece rings (so 80 solder joints in all).
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    The bottom of the spinning assembly. The collar slides up and down and is locked in place with the knob. The knob is just a block of wood epoxied around a bolt that was then ground to length (and smoothed on the end so it wouldn't chew up the shaft to fast). A threaded brass insert goes through the collar.
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    The clampy-to-the-table bits. Nothing super complicated, same idea on the knob as for the collar. The clamping piece just floats between two nuts (ground smooth and round) that are epoxied to the bolt. The upper nut is inset into the clamping piece to avoid overly marring the furniture.
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    Overhead view just to mess with your mind.
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    Another view of one with some yarn on it.
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  2. #2
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    Never seen anything like this before. Very nice work Thanks for sharing.
    Chinese Proverb: Man who eats many prunes gets good run for the money.

  3. #3
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    Very cool work Ryan! That is a lot of fiddly bits!
    Programmer - An organism that turns coffee into software.
    If all your friends are exactly like you, What an un-interesting life it must be.
    "A door is what a dog is perpetually on the wrong side of" Ogden Nash


  4. #4
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    Here is how they get used....had to look it up ...Thanks for sharing Ryan.

    http://m.youtube.com/#/watch?desktop...Hw8NcYQM&gl=CA







    Sent from my MB860 using Tapatalk 2
    cheers

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Keeble View Post
    Here is how they get used....had to look it up ...Thanks for sharing Ryan.

    http://m.youtube.com/#/watch?desktop...Hw8NcYQM&gl=CA
    Thanks, they aren't the most obvious things in operation

    If you'll compare closely you'll notice the swift in the video is.. somewhat smaller than the ones I made. I've gotten some "feedback" on that form loml I didn't really have plans so they were sort of made up based on a few pictures and some guesses.

    The next ones I make will be less oversized (I have another style I want to try that I think I can slightly improve on existing designs... we'll see, the next round is a simpler design, although I wouldn't mind doing another set of umbrella swifts to see if I can do better). A ball winder is also in the queue as an exercise in off center turning (Check the video here for how a ball winder works: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AKlBKtdvAzM).

    Loml is into the yarn and wool thing so I've been playing along. Some of the tools they use are pretty interesting woodworking projects.

  6. #6
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    That's pretty cool Ryan now to figure out how to keep my wife from seeing these

  7. #7
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    My mother had a much simpler one, but yours is really cool!
    Cheers,
    Roger


    The other member of Mensa, but not the NRA

    Everyone is a self-made person.

    "The thing about quotes on the internet is that you cannot confirm their veracity" -Abraham Lincoln

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    ABQ NM
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    Very neat, Ryan.

    By the way...simple projects, complex projects, we all learn from seeing all of them. So don't hesitate to share yours, no matter how complex they are.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  9. #9
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    Jul 2009
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    Amherst, New Hampshire
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    Looks like they were fun to build. Nice job
    Faith, Hope & Charity

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
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    St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada
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    Oh, according to my research, a bevy is Swans. Swifts are a 'screaming frenzy,' a 'box,' a 'swoop,' or a 'fanfare.'
    Cheers,
    Roger


    The other member of Mensa, but not the NRA

    Everyone is a self-made person.

    "The thing about quotes on the internet is that you cannot confirm their veracity" -Abraham Lincoln

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