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Thread: DC Ducting

  1. #1
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    DC Ducting

    I'm looking at picking up the HF 2hp dust collector tomorrow. Just curious if anyone has ran rigid ducts for this using pvc? If so, what size did you run (4", 5", 6")? Did you use Schedule 40 pvc or the thin walled pvc?

    Also, do you glue the joints? I was considering drill and screwing them so that i could re-configure if needed.

    Thanks
    Darren

    To a small child, the perfect granddad is unafraid of big dogs and fierce storms but absolutely terrified of the word “boo.” – Robert Brault

  2. #2
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    My setup is with a Jet 1.5hp DC and Wynn cartridge is all 6" as far as possible, then 4" and flex as little as i can. I didn't use PVC because at 6" the fittings made my wallet cringe. I went with 6" snap-lock HVAC ducting - the cheap stuff at HD. The only trick was the crimps on the wyes are backwards - it was worth buying the crimper to turn 'em around, for me.
    Jason Beam
    Sacramento, CA

  3. #3
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    Hi,

    When I started my dust collecting system I hit the web, libraries, purchased books, looked at magazine articles, etc., etc. I perused information for 2 or 3 months. I ended up runing 6" schedule 35 sewer and drain everyplace except the drops to the machinery. The schedule 35 was definite overkill. Don't get me wrong; I am glad I did it. However, I am sure that I spent more money than I needed to. Glenn found some ducting that is smooth inside (SMOOTH INSIDE IS CRITICAL. If not smooth it raises absolute heck with your efficiency. It has been a long time since I did the figuring. However, as I remember you have to have three times the dust collector to get the same result as you would if the ducts were smooth.) and lighter weight and less expensive. Ask him. That's what PMs are for.

    My 2 hp dust collector does the job. It does it well. However there is absolutely no surplus "suction" to waste on right angle turns, flexable ducting, and other no-no's. It is Penn State 2 hp double bagger. It is quite inexpensive for a DC. I don't have a Penn State catalog to look for the model. If you really want to know, let me know, I can find it in my paper work or on the web.

    Do NOT glue your joints. I will give you a written guarantee that you WILL move things around. If you glue it and change your mind you have to saw the joint out and throw it into the recycle. I have never had a problem with my friction fit joints---in fact I cuss a bit when I take one apart. I do not have a drop of glue in my entire system (2 bandsaws, TS, thickness planer, DP, Lathe, 12" disk and belt sanders, etc.) The wood lathe is my largest problem; I cannot create enough air movement over a large enough area to be really efficient. My ducting drops down to two 2.5in "move and stay put flex" ducts that I can place right where the cutting is occuring. They are in the way whenever I want to move the tool rest or darn near anything else. The only real answer appears to be to get a larger DC unit.

    I don't think the PennState unit is much more money than the HF. It is trememdously more healthy however. It has 1 micron bags. The last time I looked the HF was 3 micron bags. It is that tiny stuff that raises heck with the alveoli in your lungs. If the DC is in a room you can close off, away from you, or exits outside, this is not a factor.

    Do NOT make any right angle turns. They are efficiency robbers. Use two 45* angle ells with a piece of pipe coupling them to make a much softer, more efficient turn. Some companies make "long radius" 90* ells; these used to be quite expensive however. Don't try to be "pretty," think efficient instead. What are the shortest possible runs I can make without interferring with machinery, lighting or whatever.

    I have written quite a few threads and posts about DC in FWW. Do a search for them under Jim C Bradley. I have not done a search since FWW has been updated so I am no help to tell you how. If you cannot find them, let me know and I will see what I can do.

    It is your lungs and your life. To a certain degree you are looking at a trade off between money and how long you will live a healthy life. Put your money into your DC now; buy your pretty new tools later. Sorry, but I really get off on a rant about DC and healthy living for you and your family.

    Enjoy,

    JimB

    My e-mail address will be changing in a few days. I do not know the new address yet. jandmbradley@cox.net will be good for a bit.
    First of all you have to be smarter than the machine.
    VOTING MEMBER

  4. #4
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    For the HF my off the cuff experiments show that 6" works, but is low on velocity so bigger chunks had a lot of hang time, 5" was a lot better. This was on really short (6' and 10') runs so I reckon longer would be worse. The stock inlet on the HF unit is 5" unless you modify it.

    In the end I ended up re-organizing my machine layout and just using an 8' piece of 5" flex and moving it around, which is a pain, but works pretty well.

    I ended up adding the $160 Wynne filter to mine so I was a bit over $300 all told for the unit itself (not counting duct). Looking around more I've seen a few larger 2HP and 3HP machines for competitive prices used, doing over I'd probably wait and get one of those (pretty much requires 220 though).

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim C Bradley View Post
    ...The wood lathe is my largest problem; I cannot create enough air movement over a large enough area to be really efficient...
    Jim, I don't know of any woodturner on the planet who has figured out how to collect dust efficiently at the lathe. You will always have some dust that gets away, regardless of the size of your DC.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  6. #6
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    Thanks for the replies all! Have to order some things, so have some more time to research and decide what I want to do. Would like to do a 5" main, but the location of the DC may allow me to do 2 shorter runs of 4", still thinking this through though.
    Darren

    To a small child, the perfect granddad is unafraid of big dogs and fierce storms but absolutely terrified of the word “boo.” – Robert Brault

  7. #7
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    Go ahead and run 6" from as close to the DC to as close to the tool as you can. Use Wyes, not Tee's. Use dual 45's, not 90's. No sudden changes in direction. Think long sweeping curves; not really possible but, it keeps your mindset focused ;-)
    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
    - Arthur C. Clarke

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Darren Wright View Post
    Also, do you glue the joints? I was considering drill and screwing them so that i could re-configure if needed.

    Thanks
    Ditch the screws and use duck tape instead. Seals the joint from leaking and holds it together plus easy to remove for layout changes.
    The screws will stick into the pipe making for great places for things like that oppps shop rag to hang up on.
    It could be worse You could be on fire.
    Stupid hurts.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck Thoits View Post
    Ditch the screws and use duck tape instead. Seals the joint from leaking and holds it together plus easy to remove for layout changes.
    The screws will stick into the pipe making for great places for things like that oppps shop rag to hang up on.

    Ohhh is that why it's called duct tape....
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by glenn bradley View Post
    Go ahead and run 6" from as close to the DC to as close to the tool as you can. Use Wyes, not Tee's. Use dual 45's, not 90's. No sudden changes in direction. Think long sweeping curves; not really possible but, it keeps your mindset focused ;-)
    I doubt I'll be using more than a single 4" at any give time. CFM is larger with a 5 or 6" line, but won't velocity be increased with the smaller line?

    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck Thoits View Post
    Ditch the screws and use duck tape instead. Seals the joint from leaking and holds it together plus easy to remove for layout changes.
    The screws will stick into the pipe making for great places for things like that oppps shop rag to hang up on.
    Good point...Thanks!
    Darren

    To a small child, the perfect granddad is unafraid of big dogs and fierce storms but absolutely terrified of the word “boo.” – Robert Brault

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