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Thread: got my motor.....but..........

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    got my motor.....but..........


    My friend picked up my new motor at Harbor Freight today.
    Now, I don't know if I can use it. I specified a single phase 2 hp., 3450 rpm.
    When he got there the only 3450 motor they had was a single phase 3 hp.
    OK, so far, so good. Right? Not sure.
    Now, most of you know me and elektriks. Not good.
    I always thought single phase meant 110/120 V. Apparently not. This motor is 240V.
    It is also called a "compressor motor" on the owners manual. I dunno if that disqualifies it for a table saw. I do have 240V in the shop. It is run to my lathe with a simple plug in. I can make an extension cord from romex and some connectors (expensive) but will not have a switch. The foot switch I bought is only listed for 110V. I'll have to buy and rig up some kind of switch.
    BTW, the motor is a Smith+Jones make and it comes from some exotic oriental country.
    Price was only $159.99. A budget buster for me but not too bad. Will have to sit on this situation until Monday and thimk it over.
    "Folks is funny critters."

    Think for yourselves and let others enjoy the privilege to do so, too. ~Voltaire

  2. #2
    Is the motor the same frame style as far as being open where you can see inside? If so and the shaft size is the same and it will bolt in place then use it. You'll just have a little more power.
    A compressor motor always draws full power unlike a table saw motor that only draws what it needs to make the cut.

  3. #3
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    Not sure but I think you need to consider the weight of the motor & the thickness of the casting & construction of the saw. It was only made to handle so much motor weight & still be able to elevate & tilt. It is possible to overtax the casting & crack it. With the construction & the way the motor is mounted & suspended to much weight will over stress the the whole system.
    Last edited by Bart Leetch; 08-12-2012 at 12:09 AM.
    "Forget the flat stuff slap something on the spinny thing and lets go, we're burning daylight" Bart Leetch
    "If it ain't round you may be a knuckle dragger""Turners drag their nuckles too, they just do it at a higher RPM"Bart

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Fusco View Post
    ...I always thought single phase meant 110/120 V. Apparently not. This motor is 240V...
    Yeppers, as you've discovered, the single phase/3 phase denotation has nothing to do with the voltage. I won't try to explain the difference (you and elektriks, and all that), but suffice to say that most home shops are only using single phase power.

    I'm with Bart, though. That saw may not be beefy enough to handle a 3 HP motor. Also, putting together a 240v switch will likely be kind of costly. Lastly, making an extension cord out of Romex is flirting with disaster. Not saying I've never done the same thing, but it's not a good idea. The wire inside is not meant to be bent repeatedly (as will happen with an extension cord). It's meant to be bent once as it's built into a wall, then left alone. You'll be running a risk of a broken wire, short, or fire.

    Harbor Freight has a good return policy (which I believe also applies to their motors). My suggestion would be for the friend to take it back next time he goes there.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

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  5. #5
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    Maybe it would be cheaper to find a used table saw on Craigs List and just use the motor
    Faith, Hope & Charity

  6. #6
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    Rochester
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Gibson View Post
    Maybe it would be cheaper to find a used table saw on Craigs List and just use the motor
    +1. I'm not exactly sure what compressor duty means, but I'm pretty sure a compressor poses a much steadier load than a TS.
    Got Wood?

  7. #7
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    I'm not sure about anything at this point. I was thinking about running a line (OK genuine extension cord) from the connection at my Griz lathe for the saw. I would need a switch. Costly. But, again I'm bumfuzzled with the single phase/3 phase thing. Here is what I have on the G0532 lathe from Griz' own specs: <<<•Motor: 1-1/2 HP, 220V, 3-phase with single-phase frequency drive
    •Power requirement: 220V, single-phase>>>
    How can it be three phase with single phase. Huhhhhhh????
    "Folks is funny critters."

    Think for yourselves and let others enjoy the privilege to do so, too. ~Voltaire

  8. #8
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    Frank i wish you were closer to Larrys place, would have no problem popping over and helping you sort this out. I also think you best be changing up that motor. I wont confuse you further with the explanation on your lathe.
    cheers

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Fusco View Post
    I'm not sure about anything at this point. I was thinking about running a line (OK genuine extension cord) from the connection at my Griz lathe for the saw. I would need a switch. Costly. But, again I'm bumfuzzled with the single phase/3 phase thing. Here is what I have on the G0532 lathe from Griz' own specs: <<<•Motor: 1-1/2 HP, 220V, 3-phase with single-phase frequency drive
    •Power requirement: 220V, single-phase>>>
    How can it be three phase with single phase. Huhhhhhh????
    Single phase is anything that requires a single or a double breaker ( two single breakers connect together ).

    On your lathe they are taking 220 volt single phase and converting it to 3 phase electronically.

    Put your original motor and the new motor side by side. If they are very close to the same size and weight and you don't mind getting a different switch then use it.

  10. #10
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    Frank, the motor on your lathe is 3 phase. The frequency drive is single phase and allows the machine to operate off of single phase. Your new saw motor has two things for you to consider. One, it is 220V, single phase. Extensions cords and switches are quite pricey for this. Can't use any old extension cord and you also cannot extend too far. I have a 15 foot #10 wire extension on my 220V 3HP Grizzly saw, as an example. The plugs and outlets can easily run over $20 a pop. The cord is also quite pricey, likely well over a dollar a foot. The second issue is the weight of the motor. And that maybe your real kicker. I'd suggest to keep things simple and within the realm of the capabilities of that saw, exchange the motor for a 110V signal phase of lesser power and less weight. Just suggesting, or this could get weirderer and weiderer. And much more expensive.

    Let's just say, you need 20' of cord. You have the motor cord plug, the two ends to the extension cord, and the outlet. Let's say the wire was $1.50 a foot and each plug/outlet was $20. My pencil says $115 to get the saw motor plugged in. Ouch! and I've BTDT! Hit up your electrical supplier and take your calculator. And remember, each of those items needs to be wired up. Not to mention you don't like electric stuff.
    ++++++

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