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Thread: New plastic laminate on the counter tops

  1. #1
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    New plastic laminate on the counter tops

    I need to replace my kitchen counter tops before the house sale closes. I have the plastic laminate and adhesive. Can I apply it over the old stuff or do I need to replace the substrate and start from scratch?
    ++++++

    Some say the land of milk and honey; others say the land of fruits and nuts. All together my sort of heaven.

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    Carol Reed

  2. #2
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    Carol you can strip the edges & back splash & sand the top laminate to give it some tooth & using the regular contact cement not the water based cement glue the ends on first & then the front Then the top & back splash.

    Water based cement doesn't work well to glue laminate to laminate, according to the installers I know.
    "Forget the flat stuff slap something on the spinny thing and lets go, we're burning daylight" Bart Leetch
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bart Leetch View Post
    Carol you can strip the edges & back splash & sand the top laminate to give it some tooth & using the regular contact cement not the water based cement glue the ends on first & then the front Then the top & back splash.

    Water based cement doesn't work well to glue laminate to laminate, according to the installers I know.

    +1. I agree. You may have to remove your sink, depending on its type and how it was installed. If the current top is a "post formed" top, i.e., particle board core, rounded front edge, and integral backsplash, you won't be able to laminate it DIY, you'll have to replace it.




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  4. #4
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    And me to the yep, you can do that, list.
    If you don't take pride in your work, life get's pretty boring.

    Rule of thumb is if you donít know what tool to buy next, then you probably donít need it yet.

  5. #5
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    Thanks, guys. That just made life easier. No post formed backsplash. There is a separate piece which I will remove all together. I plan on a row of 6" tile for the backsplash when the new laminate is down. I'll have to check my adhesive.

    But a few questions.

    Sand with what grit for 'tooth'?

    Which goes first, the edges or the top? Also, the outside corners are radius-ed. I am assuming the laminate will bend without heating or something.

    Lastly, the big counter is "L" shaped and has a miter cut in the laminate. I gather I need to repeat that? I got one 12' and two 8' pieces.
    ++++++

    Some say the land of milk and honey; others say the land of fruits and nuts. All together my sort of heaven.

    Power is not taken. It is given. Who have you given yours to? Hmmmm?

    Carol Reed

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carol Reed View Post
    Thanks, guys. That just made life easier. No post formed backsplash. There is a separate piece which I will remove all together. I plan on a row of 6" tile for the backsplash when the new laminate is down. I'll have to check my adhesive.

    But a few questions.

    Sand with what grit for 'tooth'?
    If you're using a ROS, or a belt sander, a 50x -80x would work well.

    Quote Originally Posted by Carol Reed View Post
    Which goes first, the edges or the top? Also, the outside corners are radius-ed. I am assuming the laminate will bend without heating or something.
    The ends first, then the front, then the top. Laminate comes in two popular sizes. For horizontal use...1/16"... like for countertops. For vertical use, 1/32". Many patterns and colors come in both thicknesses in order to get a match up. In many cases, the 1/32" will bend around a 3" radius fairly easy. If not, a warm up with a heat gun will work wonders. If you are stuck with 1/16" material, you can block sand the backside carefully to get it to bend without cracking.

    Quote Originally Posted by Carol Reed View Post
    Lastly, the big counter is "L" shaped and has a miter cut in the laminate. I gather I need to repeat that? I got one 12' and two 8' pieces.
    Yes, that is the usual way. But, some installers prefer to use a 90 degree seam because it's shorter. Actually, I like the miter cut myself. You can use a straightedge clamped to the underside to rout the cut with a flush trim router bit. I use a 6" wide piece of ĺ" plywood with a laminated edge as a straight edge. Ideally, if both pieces to be mitered can be clamped so as to permit a onetime pass at 45 degrees, the fit will be very good. Whatever happens to one side happens to the other, and they will mate. You could pre cut the laminate on a 45, leaving ľ" long. That way you aren't routing a lot of material at one time. Allow for the diameter of the bit when you do this.

    When you do cut your miters, mark both sheets where they are supposed to meet before you rout, so as to align them afterward. When checking both sheets for a fit, the edge can be back filed slightly to allow the edges to mate better. You may have to file on the mating edges to get a good fit. My suggestion for installing would be to apply one sheet, with a spacer, like a ľ" dowel about 8" from the seam. Do that with the second piece. You can use Ĺ" dowels on the rest of the sheet to keep the parts from making contact until you're ready to stick them down. Position both sheets, and very easy pull out the dowels and let the sheet touch down (in the middle of its length) but don't press it down. When the miter is lined up, touch down both mitered edges. You should have a small hump where the ľ" dowel was. Use that gap to force the two edges together. Then press the rest of the sheet down. If the fit was good in the beginning, you may only need what one ľ" dowel provided.

    Press down with your hands from the center out to the edges to get all the air out. Then you can use a "J" roller, or a block of wood and a hammer. A general tip...when both surfaces have been coated with solvent based contact cement, it will stink like heck. So, make sure the area is well ventilated, You could get quite light headed. Before applying the laminate, be sure to check all mating surfaces for any debris, as that will show as bumps when you are done. Also check the mitered edges for any glue that would keep them from mating.




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  7. #7
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    Mike is right on track. Easy as pie.
    If you don't take pride in your work, life get's pretty boring.

    Rule of thumb is if you donít know what tool to buy next, then you probably donít need it yet.

  8. #8
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    yup mike didnt miss a lick on the instructrions!!
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
    One hand washes the other!
    Don't put off today till tomorrow!

  9. #9
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    Post deleted...no edits.



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    Last edited by mike marvel; 08-29-2012 at 01:17 AM.

  10. #10
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    mike to stick up for carol she has alot on her plate right now so perhaps she hasnt got there yet.. cant speak for her but can stick up for her
    thanks for the response and info you gave her and others can benefit from it later on perhaps..
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
    One hand washes the other!
    Don't put off today till tomorrow!

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