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Thread: BIG job done!

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Nova Scotia, 45N 64W
    Posts
    1,245

    BIG job done!

    700 bales of second cut hay, all up in the barn by 10 am this morning, thanks to 5 able young guys (in the hayloft) and two wise old owls down on the wagons I have a rule that no one under fifty is allowed to set the pace!!
    That's a major item crossed off my to-do list!! A month ago I was getting worried we wouldn't be getting any, due to the dry summer.

    Decided after that we really need a hammock around this place

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    bethel springs TN, but was born and raised in north east PA
    Posts
    3,132
    i remember helping my grandfather bale hay every year,when i was young. Talk about some hot sticky work.Glad ya got it in the loft,and had some help doing it. Now go find that hammock and take the rest of the day off.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Delton, Michigan
    Posts
    17,472
    yup i too have played in the hay loft and i was the oldest one, the young bucks wouldnt want to be in there to hot not always but most would rather avoid it..
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
    One hand washes the other!
    Don't put off today till tomorrow!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Lafayette, Indiana
    Posts
    2,380
    I did this a couple times for my in-laws. These ol city boy hands were feeling it the next day for sure.
    It's not what you achieve in life...It's what you overcome!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    San Antonio, Texas
    Posts
    765
    Oh, man, that brings back memories! What grampa didn't bale, he stacked. I still remember how tired I was when he'd pick me off the top with the tractor forks at the end of the day.
    Billy B.

    "It has been said that politics is the second oldest profession. I have learned that it bears a striking resemblance to the first." - Ronald Reagan

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Oliver Springs, TN
    Posts
    1,726
    Yep, used to put it up around here too. That's how I made spending money during the summer. About everyone has gone to round bales around here.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Southeast Pa
    Posts
    2,019
    Quote Originally Posted by John Daugherty View Post
    Yep, used to put it up around here too. That's how I made spending money during the summer. About everyone has gone to round bales around here.
    1.5 to 2 cents a bale from field to barn. Good money for those of us too young to drive back in the e50's-60's... Now I help with 50 bales and my shoulders quit...

    Garry

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Reno NV
    Posts
    13,361
    Helped my uncle do a little baling, and spent a summer at college working on a dairy farm. Lots of baling, lots of milking. Made me appreciate the value of getting a good education...
    Programmer - An organism that turns coffee into software.
    If all your friends are exactly like you, What an un-interesting life it must be.
    "A door is what a dog is perpetually on the wrong side of" Ogden Nash


  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Nova Scotia, 45N 64W
    Posts
    1,245
    We actually do this a lot easier than we used to. We don't make our own hay - no economy in having that gear for an operation this size.
    We get two lots of hay. There's 2-300 bales of first cut timothy for the old horses, supplied by our firewood guy (Mr Curly Maple, as some of you have come to know him), just a warm-up.
    Then there's about 700 bales of the second cut grassy stuff for the sheep. With the second cut, you get a lot less stem, which they don't eat. So, it's more expensive, but a lot less waste. This comes from friends of ours, dairy farmers who immigrated from Holland about thirty years ago. They are hay-making masters.The hay comes right to us in the bale-thrower wagons, accompanied by one or two big strong Dutch boys in their 20's, so haying consists of 2-3 hours of heavy work unloading and piling back.
    Maybe round bales are in the future for us, but we're not really set up for it now. No way to store it or feed it out, the way the old barn is built.

    Back on the farm when I was growing up and into my 20's, we had 6-8 Quarter Horses around most of the time. Hay grew in the rotation with the main cash crops and was made with some worn-out gear left over from a beef cattle operation. The old baler did not leave fond memories. I definitely like our current method a lot better. I'm still ready for the hammock though

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Oak Harbor Washington on Whidbey Island
    Posts
    3,134
    I remember hay season as pure misery with hay fever / asthma depending on what was in the air. I was flipping bales while Dad went to get medicine flip 3-4 bales sit on the next one until I could get enough oxygen to move on. Never did much during the season because of it.
    "Forget the flat stuff slap something on the spinny thing and lets go, we're burning daylight" Bart Leetch
    "If it ain't round you may be a knuckle dragger""Turners drag their nuckles too, they just do it at a higher RPM"Bart

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