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Thread: Cutting angled pieces

  1. #1

    Cutting angled pieces

    Not really staves but I am looking for a safe and true way of cutting pieces about 8 to 10" long on a tablesaw. I want to be able to use either 4 or 6 or 8 pieces to make a cylinder. So what I am looking to do is cut lengths of wood with both sides with the appropriate angles. Not sure what they call these but they would look like a stave but not a compound angle. Anyone have suggestions for a safe easy accurrate method??? Thanks
    John T.

  2. #2
    John,

    That really would not be difficult. The hardest part would be getting the table saw blade tipped to the exact angle.

    For using 6 pieces for example, you would cut a 30º angle on each side of your stave. I'd use a plastic drafting square with 30º, 60º and 90º angles. Use the 30º angle to set the tilt angle of the blade. Use your fence to set the width you want for the stave. Using a push block to push the stave through the cut, cut one side. Reverse the stave with the long side of the cut angle up (on top) against the fence, cut the other side. Always use a push block.
    Last edited by Ken Fitzgerald; 09-05-2012 at 03:13 AM.
    Ken
    ------



  3. #3
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    Ken pretty much explained how I'd do it. I'll add that you should set your fence up so the blade is pointing away from the fence. Something like this:



    If the fence on your saw tilts the other direction (to the right), then your fence should be on the other (left) side of the blade.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vaughn McMillan View Post
    Ken pretty much explained how I'd do it. I'll add that you should set your fence up so the blade is pointing away from the fence. Something like this:



    If the fence on your saw tilts the other direction (to the right), then your fence should be on the other (left) side of the blade.
    Hey Vaughn, you forgot to show the splitter, or was Ned suppose to sketch that in for you. I know, I'am bad!
    “When love and skill work together, expect a masterpiece.” - John Ruskin
    “Nowadays people know the price of everything and the value of nothing.” - Oscar Wilde

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    John, Ken and Vaughn both detailed how I'd do it. Ken mentioned the use of a push block and I cannot emphasize that enough. Not a push stick, but a push block. One that keeps your hand from being anywhere near the blade is best. You can build your own using of a piece of 2x4 with a "D" shaped handle placed in the middle of the top of it. I use a piece of replaceable 1/4" MDF at the back that drops down a bit to push the piece through the blade. Or you can spend a few bucks (Well worth the price) and use the Grr-Ripper.
    Billy B.

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    I think they explained it just fine. If you don't have a little wixey type of angle gauge, I'd recommend one for setting the angle of the blade.
    Darren

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  7. #7
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    to add to what they have said is to make long staves first then cut to length on a chop saw or use your mitre guage to cut to length..

    vaughn how did you draw that saw blade??? you been holding out on us with your sketchup skills
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Satko View Post
    Hey Vaughn, you forgot to show the splitter, or was Ned suppose to sketch that in for you. I know, I'am bad!
    OK, Mr. Smart Pants, it's a MicroJig splitter, so it's low and not visible. And yes, it was specially installed at an angle for this cut. (I shoulda drawn in a riving knife.)

    Seriously, for a cut like this I wouldn't be using an overhead guard or the factory splitter on my saw, since either would prevent me from using my Grr-ripper to push the material through the cut. And unlike Larry, I would probably cut the pieces to length before ripping them. This would reduce the chance of having a pinched blade, and by making the rip cuts on shorter (12" to 18") pieces of wood, I'd be able to do each one in a single motion, resulting in a smoother, glue-ready cut. (Or at least that was my experience making fancy cutting boards. I was more likely to have imperfections on a single 48" rip than I would have on three 16" rips. On the shorter pieces, though, the Grr-ripper becomes even more important.)

    Quote Originally Posted by larry merlau View Post
    ...vaughn how did you draw that saw blade??? you been holding out on us with your sketchup skills
    Nah, I'm nowhere near that good. The SketchUp 3-D Warehouse comes to the rescue every time.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

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  9. #9
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    Personally, if it was me, I would rip & cross cut them on the bandsaw and finish them up with a hand plane. Of course if I was Ken Werner, I would split them from the log with my froe, get them close using my drawknife and then finish it up with a hand plane.

    Mr. Smarty Pants
    “When love and skill work together, expect a masterpiece.” - John Ruskin
    “Nowadays people know the price of everything and the value of nothing.” - Oscar Wilde

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Vaughn McMillan View Post
    Nah, I'm nowhere near that good. The SketchUp 3-D Warehouse comes to the rescue every time.
    Sounds like a homework assignment!

    It was surprisingly simple! There's a tool to do this... hit the CTRL key once when using the "Rotate" tool. It makes a copy and rotates it. Then use the array copy short cut (*23 for 23 copies) and it copies and rotates all the copies. Pow! Instant saw blade. After discovering that little tool, the hardest part (for me) was getting the hook angle right and (especially) the tooth bevel angle. I still don't think I got the teeth right....

    Click image for larger version. 

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