Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 16

Thread: Steel Studs.....?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Tokyo Japan
    Posts
    15,807

    Steel Studs.....?

    I'm building a very simple wall, it will have one door in it, I want to use steel studs, mainly because they are about the same price as 2x4s here, and they go up easy and quick, as well as straight, and because they do not burn! Really you should see the poor quality 2x4s we have been getting recently here, they are really bad, hockey stick like, and expensive.

    Anyone with any experience framing a wall with steel studs?

    NOT load bearing, just enclosing a space in our parking area to use as storage for my new business.

    From what I understand you just put the channel top and bottom and then cut the studs to fit, and screw them in place, fairly simple no?

    Double up on each side of the door and over the top of the door too?

    I've never done steel studs, seen it done, worked around it while it was being done, but I've never done it.

    Tips, or links etc would be great, I'l be showing some pics later when I have time to take some.

    Cheers!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    RETIRED(!) in Austintown, Ohio
    Posts
    5,319
    I can't help you with the metal studs, but what's the new business? Just curious...
    Jim D.
    Adapt, Improvise, Overcome!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    San Antonio, Texas
    Posts
    765
    Stu, it is pretty much as simple as you said. However, I don't remember doubling the studs for doors back when I worked construction. This youtube video should get you started and he has more for things like doors and windows.
    Billy B.

    "It has been said that politics is the second oldest profession. I have learned that it bears a striking resemblance to the first." - Ronald Reagan

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Tokyo Japan
    Posts
    15,807
    From what I saw at the home center there are two basic kinds of steel studs here.....

    These steel studs are not open on one side, they are a full rectangle, they look very solid

    These one are more like what I'm used to seeing in Canada.....

    has holes etc to run wire.
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Tokyo Japan
    Posts
    15,807
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim DeLaney View Post
    I can't help you with the metal studs, but what's the new business? Just curious...
    In time Jim, nothing shocking, just a progression, I'm still in talks, but it looks good!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Tokyo Japan
    Posts
    15,807
    Quote Originally Posted by Billy Burt View Post
    Stu, it is pretty much as simple as you said. However, I don't remember doubling the studs for doors back when I worked construction. This youtube video should get you started and he has more for things like doors and windows.
    Thanks Billy, that is pretty much what I remember, the only thing I have to choose is to run the full rectangle studs or the open studs, I have no plans for any electrical in the walls, so..... Simple is best?
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Kansas City, Missouri
    Posts
    13,437
    Billy pretty much nailed the "how to". I worked with them for several years in commercial construction. If you want to put in a wooden jamb door that can be shimmed and nailed, just frame around the door opening with a regular 2x4 wood stud on each side in place of the metal studs and run one across the top of the opening to nail your trim to.
    Darren

    To a small child, the perfect granddad is unafraid of big dogs and fierce storms but absolutely terrified of the word “boo.” – Robert Brault

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Tokyo Japan
    Posts
    15,807
    Quote Originally Posted by Darren Wright View Post
    Billy pretty much nailed the "how to". I worked with them for several years in commercial construction. If you want to put in a wooden jamb door that can be shimmed and nailed, just frame around the door opening with a regular 2x4 wood stud on each side in place of the metal studs and run one across the top of the opening to nail your trim to.
    The door jam is steel, and the doors are double door, and also steel, and very heavy.
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Victoria BC
    Posts
    87
    Stu there are several gauges of metal studs here in Canada with the most common being 25 and 18. If your hanging a heavy double door I would go with the heavier studs if you can get them. Also what is the floor you are attaching the track to? If it is concrete or say carpet you can get heavy duty plastic velcro in rolls that is made for demountable partitions so there is no damage done to the floor.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Oceanside, So. Calif. 5 mi. to the ocean
    Posts
    4,944
    I am all for steel studs. If I were building, I would definitely consider them.

    One thing I have noticed in the commercial buildings I have had optical stores in, is that the walls vibrate. Slam a door and the pictures on the wall vibrate. If the store next door has a radio on their shelf, you can hear it perfectly, whether you want to or not.

    Therefore, I would want the construction to be as rigid as practical to reduce vibration and undesired sounds...so the doubling of studs and crosspieces above sounds good to me.
    I would also think greater mass in the skin (thicker, more dense material) would be a help. Does anyone make something like rubber to put between the studs and the skin to absorb vibration and skin resonance?

    These are just comments from a user, not a constructor. I did not use steel in my medical buildings and each skin was an inch thick with drywall and plaster. Medical buildings also got fiberglass A/C ducting. Each exam room had its own separate return duct to the A/C unit. I did not want any conversations to travel from one room to another. I did use steel with steel lath and plaster in the optical store walls which were in the interiors of commercial spaces (malls).

    Enjoy your new venture,

    JimB
    Last edited by Jim C Bradley; 09-06-2012 at 08:45 PM. Reason: clarification
    First of all you have to be smarter than the machine.
    VOTING MEMBER

Similar Threads

  1. Hardening Steel
    By Darren Wright in forum Handtool Project Showcase
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 06-26-2010, 10:27 PM
  2. Steel snake
    By John D. Frigillana Jr. in forum Turning Tool Questions and Show & Tell
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 04-13-2009, 12:50 PM
  3. Steel snake help
    By Chuck Beland in forum Turning Tool Questions and Show & Tell
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 09-27-2008, 10:16 AM
  4. Beyond difference in steel
    By Gordon Seto in forum Turning Tool Questions and Show & Tell
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 06-09-2008, 12:33 AM
  5. drilling steel
    By Frank Fusco in forum Off Topic Discussion
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 05-30-2008, 01:26 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •