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Thread: Planer feed rollers

  1. #1
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    Planer feed rollers

    I was going to highjack my own thread, but on the same machine. That didn't work well so here is my newest thread.

    What do others do to keep the feed rollers gripping the wood and feeding smoothly and continuously? At times, mine literally stops and I have to pull the material along from the outfeed side, of course keeping my hands in the clear. Replacement rollers seem to be getting unobtainable, but my supplier is going to keep looking for me.

    In the meantime, what can I do to get the roller surfaces stickier? Any thoughts on maybe wrapping self adhesive sand sandpaper ( like would be done on a drum sander)?

    I am open to trying suggestions from the "family".

    Aloha, Tony
    "You got to learn from the mistakes of others. You won't live long enough to make them all yourself". (Author unknown)

    "Time flies like..... an arrow,,,Fruit flies like..... a banana." Groucho Marx

    Ah,,,to live in Paradise!

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    Fighting for all I am worth, and praying every day.

  2. #2
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    In case you missed it in the other thread, I've had good success using denatured alcohol to clean the rubber feed rollers in my Delta lunchbox planer.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  3. #3
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    +1 on DNA but, waxing the tables/platen is a cure as well. Does the wood going through the planer have a smooth jointed face down? If so, a slick surface shouldn't need much grip to feed things through . . . hmmm, are the knives nice and sharp? Anytime I have to muscle material through a cutter, I check for cutter sharpness and surface slickness.
    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
    - Arthur C. Clarke

  4. #4
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    This is clear out of woodworking, however, it might give you a good idea.

    When I was in Jr. High School I worked after school repairing typewriters. You have heard of typewriters? They show up in old black and white movies in the editorial room in the newspaper scenes.

    Anyway the platen (round, cylindrical, rubber part of the typewriter where the mechanical keys struck the paper) would, over time form a hard crust. The cure was to soak some black, I would guess 400 grit, sandpaper with alcohol. Take an entire sheet of the paper in your hand, curve it around the platen and stroke the platen bach and forth while rotating it back and forth. This would remove the "crust" and the platen could pull the paper through the machine again.

    This would last through an entire year of typing classes at the High School. Most of the machines did not need to have it done after only one year.

    The entire point of that disjointed description was: When the student hit the return lever, to turn the platen, to feed the paper up one line to be ready to type the next line, the platen glaze would just slip on the paper and not feed it up. Alcohol sanding the platen made it work just like new and it would last a long time.

    I hope this helps you.

    Enjoy,

    JimB
    First of all you have to be smarter than the machine.
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  5. #5
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    another vote for DNA and a slick surface on feed tables then sharp knives
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
    One hand washes the other!
    Don't put off today till tomorrow!

  6. #6
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    I recently planed a bunch of SYP and the feed rollers had pitch buildup on them. Ammonia took it right off, really improved the traction of the rollers, and cleared my sinuses as a side benefit.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Newby View Post
    I recently planed a bunch of SYP and the feed rollers had pitch buildup on them. Ammonia took it right off, really improved the traction of the rollers, and cleared my sinuses as a side benefit.
    It also opened up your eustacian tubes too didn't it.

    Enjoy better hearing through chemistry! (to paraphrase Du Pont chemistry commercials)

    JimB
    First of all you have to be smarter than the machine.
    VOTING MEMBER

  8. #8
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    Thanks for the suggestions guys.

    Vaughn, I have tried DNA, very short term results. Even a lacquer thinner wash.

    Glenn, The boards have one side jointed first and that side is down going through the planer. The platen is clean, smooth and slick. This doesn't happen with every board either. And when I have to pull the piece through, I need to pull pretty hard. The knives are new and sharp and set properly.

    Jim, I have tried alcohol with Scotchbrite, and light sandpapering too.

    Larry, the platen has been checked and as I mentioned above, this doesn't happen every time.

    Roger, this material is all dry red oak and jointed on one face. I am planing no boards over 4" wide, and most are 1.5.or 2 inches wide. Taking light cuts, but cutting on every pass.

    I am going to pull the rollers out of the planer and do some close ckecking. Anybody see anything wrong with trying PSA sandpaper strips wound on each roller like a drum sander? I wonder what grit I would need to try to avoid leaving dents on the wood surface?

    Gotta try something. I am needing this planer more all the time. (Flatwork Larry, LOL)

    Much mahalos gentlemen. Aloha
    "You got to learn from the mistakes of others. You won't live long enough to make them all yourself". (Author unknown)

    "Time flies like..... an arrow,,,Fruit flies like..... a banana." Groucho Marx

    Ah,,,to live in Paradise!

    Registered voting member

    Fighting for all I am worth, and praying every day.

  9. #9
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    Have you checked the drive belt? Maybe it's worn and slipping.
    Faith, Hope & Charity

  10. #10
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    Bob, good question, but the only belt is a "timing" type belt from the motor to the cutter head. That is good shape at proper tension and not slipping. The cutter head runs consistantly. Now, the rollers are all chain driven and no problems found there either.

    I am going to recheck everything and I will post my findings.

    Thank you.
    "You got to learn from the mistakes of others. You won't live long enough to make them all yourself". (Author unknown)

    "Time flies like..... an arrow,,,Fruit flies like..... a banana." Groucho Marx

    Ah,,,to live in Paradise!

    Registered voting member

    Fighting for all I am worth, and praying every day.

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