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Thread: Feeding lumber to a Dewalt 735 planer

  1. #1
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    Feeding lumber to a Dewalt 735 planer

    Well, good morning! Time for some new novice questions!

    I've got the Dewalt 735 planer. I love it, and it planes great. But I think I'm not feeding wood to it correctly. It says in the instruction manual that you put the wood in there, crank it down to where you want it, pull out the wood, then feed it. Well, if I put the wood in there far enough to get a careful read, it's impossible to get it out before turning it on. If it put it in just a little to get a read, you still have to pull it hard to get it out. If I put it in a tiny bit, I'm not sure I'm getting a careful read. What am I doing wrong?

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  2. #2
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    I usually put a board in the planer and crank down until the board just begins to move, let it run through, then run it again.

    If you are doing a batch of boards, keep in mind they may not all be the same dimensions, so if you can, start with the fattest one first.

    Once I get the initial height dialed in, I run all the boards through once, then start the process of cranking it down a little, running the batch of boards, cranking it down, lather, rinse, repeat...
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brent Dowell View Post
    I usually put a board in the planer and crank down until the board just begins to move, let it run through, then run it again.
    You mean you crank it down while the machine is turned on???
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  4. #4
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    Hmmm, Well, that's the way I do it.

    I do it so that the board is all the way through the planer and do it just until the board starts to move.

    Maybe we'll both get a lesson from the safety experts today!

    But if you do it with the power off, as they say, and you are cranking it down so that you can't pull the board back out, that's probably too low to start with.
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  5. #5
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    Don't forget there is a depth of out gauge on the front of your planer, adjust so it is just moving the gauge, turn on and feed. The rollers should feed the board even if the blades are not touching but if, say the gauge is reading 1/32" it should remove wood. Play with it and you will get the "feel" of the machine, it is a good one.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cynthia White View Post
    You mean you crank it down while the machine is turned on???
    Here's how I do it with my cheapo Delta lunchbox planer. (It doesn't have a depth of cut gauge, just a board thinkness gauge that's worthless.) Not sure if it's the right way, but it's how I do it. Some of these steps are not as necessary with a more powerful planer...
    1. Make sure the planer is turned off.
    2. Raise the cutter head high enough that the fattest board of the batch can slide through with no resistance.
    3. Put the fattest board of the batch on the bed of the planer, then lower the cutter head slowly until it just barely touches the top of the board and makes it difficult to slide the board around.
    4. Raise the cutter head slightly, just enough to slide the board out of the planer (About 1/5 of a turn seems to work on my planer.)
    5. Once the board is removed, lower the cutter head back to the point you just moved it from. (Here again, about 1/5 of a turn on my planer.)
    6. Turn on the planer and feed the first board through. It will likely just barely remove any wood.
    7. Feed the rest of the boards through. (If there are significantly thinner boards in the batch, don't bother feeding them through yet, since the feed rollers won't be touching them.)
    8. Lower the cutter head slightly. (Again, I use about 1/5 of a turn. YMMV. Stronger planers can take bigger bites.)
    9. Feed the boards through again.
    10. Repeat steps 8 and 9 until all the boards are at the desired thickness.
    Sometimes, my initial height setting will be too high and the feed rollers will not make enough contact with the wood to push it all the way through the machine. In those cases, I will very slightly lower the cutter head as the motor is running, but only to the point where the feed rollers can actually push the wood again. Conversely, if on the initial pass the cutter head seems to bog down due to a thicker part of the board, I will slightly raise the cutter head as the motor is running to prevent any potential damage from overworking the motor.
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  7. #7
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    and to add to what vaughn has said, when you run into that fatter board that caused you to raise the cut height ,remember how much you raised it then resend it at s lower setting till you can get it to the same thickness as the rest are at in the group..so you can then go threw all of them at the same cut hieght
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  8. #8
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    with the 735, there is that red arrow in the front(feed side) that indicates how much you are going to take off.
    If you dont trust the dial, that gives you 3/4, 1/2 inch etc......then you have to figure out where you are going to stop the planer.
    But, just to get started, slide the piece of wood in 3 inchs under the carriage.
    Turn the carriage down slowly just until the red arrow edges up a tiny bit.(technical words)
    Thats where the board is set for the first pass.
    You should be able to slide the board back out now, then turn on the power, slide the board through.
    I also do what brent does, I turn the carriage down slowly till the wood moves and thats my first pass.
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  9. #9
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    The DW735 has a pretty decent depth of cut gauge built in:

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Slide the edge of your material under the gauge "feeler". This is well before you enter the machine and get snagged up on the things that are making it hard for you to remove the board. Lower the cutterhead till the depth of cut gauge reads about 1/32", remove your board, start the machine and make your first pass. Continue from there.
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  10. #10
    Wow you all sure do go thru alot of steps just to plane a board down. I just barely insert mine about 1/2" and crank it down till the dial on the front for depth of cut moves and send it thru. I find on my ridgid it's very accurate! If I'm not mistaken the 735 has one also.

    As far as taking a cut I do at least a half turn. Anything under about 4" in width I'll take a full turn which on mine is 1/16".

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