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Thread: pipe for pipe clamps

  1. #1
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    pipe for pipe clamps

    Can anyone give me an idea where to buy cheap pipe for pipe clamps. Also, is there a clever, makeshift, poor man's way to clamp something long if you don't have clamps that long?

    Thank you
    AKA Young Grasshopper Woodworker
    AKA The Rookie

  2. #2
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    If you have a selection of pipe clamps and don't need all of them for the clamp-up, get some 3/4" couplings and put pipes together. Take the sliding part of the pipe clamp off the first clamp, use the coupling to add a section of pipe, then slide on the sliding part of the original clamp.

    Alternately, take the sliding part of the first clamp off and set it aside. Then take the sliding part of the clamp you're going to add to the first clamp, and turn it around. Put the two clamps together with a coupling and use the second sliding part of the clamp to clamp against. The second technique just eliminates having to take everything off the second clamp.

    What some people do is have three sections of pipe in the shop that they can add to existing clamps when they need longer length. I never did that.

    Mike
    Ancora imparo
    Go into the world and do well. But more importantly, go into the world and do good.

  3. #3
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    simple black pipe from the hardware store... not much else will work in there, just get the non-galvanized version iirc.

    Mike, great tip, thanks!
    -Ned

  4. #4
    Here are a couple of pictures to show you what type coupling to get. They are located in the electrical section and are used to connect ridgid pipe.

    Personally I prefer galvanized as it grips the pipe better and doesn't leave any black marks.
    Click image for larger version. 

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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alan Bienlein View Post
    ...Personally I prefer galvanized as it grips the pipe better and doesn't leave any black marks.
    Same here, although if I'm using black iron pipe, I'll put a piece of wax paper between the clamp and the wood to prevent staining.
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  6. #6
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    alan, i thought galvanized did 'bad things' to the wood?
    -Ned

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ned Bulken View Post
    alan, i thought galvanized did 'bad things' to the wood?
    Nope, it's the other way around, in my experience. Black iron pipe can stain the wood.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  8. #8
    NO Ned it doesn't. I don't ever remember having to deal with black marks since I got galvanized pipe for my clamps. The clamps also grip the pipe better.

    Also if I remember correctly I think I bought 3/4" ridgid pipe in the electrical section as I think it was cheaper than the plumbing galvanized pipe.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alan Bienlein View Post
    NO Ned it doesn't. I don't ever remember having to deal with black marks since I got galvanized pipe for my clamps. The clamps also grip the pipe better.

    Also if I remember correctly I think I bought 3/4" ridgid pipe in the electrical section as I think it was cheaper than the plumbing galvanized pipe.
    cool, good to know for when I finally can afford another set of pipe clamps!
    -Ned

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alan Bienlein View Post
    Also if I remember correctly I think I bought 3/4" ridgid pipe in the electrical section as I think it was cheaper than the plumbing galvanized pipe.
    That would be conduit. Just remember that it is thinner walled material and as such, it can bend easier under clamping pressure. This could be important if you are gluing up a panel and need it to stay flat.
    Billy B.

    "It has been said that politics is the second oldest profession. I have learned that it bears a striking resemblance to the first." - Ronald Reagan

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