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Thread: Endgrain Pieces/DNA Bath/ Need Anchorseal ?

  1. #1
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    Endgrain Pieces/DNA Bath/ Need Anchorseal ?

    I have turned some endgrain pieces. Small to mid size stuff...I soaked them in a dna bath 12 to 24 hrs. Do I need to now put anchorseal on the endgrain part or is that defeating the purpose, unnecessary or overkill?

  2. #2
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    It depends somewhat on the wood species, the wall thickness, and the size of the piece. I've not turned much endgrain stuff, but IMO the Anchor Seal is probably not necessary. (Then again, I don't put Anchor Seal on any of my rough turnings. Heck, I've pretty much quit using DNA, too, since I have about the same 90% - 95% success rate without.)
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
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  3. #3
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    I don't use DNA bath much anymore but instead after watching a demo by Mike Mahoney who roughs his bowls, HF's, platters, etc. and anchorseals the whole piece. I have lost one bowl. It was apple which didn't surprise me. So all my turnings get a coat of anchorseal after roughing. It does take from 8 months to a year for them to dry but I am not in a hurry. I have some 70 or 80 bowls in varies states of drying. Everytime I finish one I rough 3 or 4 more to replace it. That way I have a supply of lidded boxes, platters, bowls, HF's, etc at all times ready to finish.
    Bernie W.

    Retirement: Thats when you return from work one day
    and say, Hi, Honey, Im home forever.

    To succeed in life, you need three things: a wishbone, a backbone and a funnybone.

  4. #4
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    Mike I rough turn my bowls, soak in DNA overnight. Let them flash off to surface dry, then I coat the outside with Anchorseal or Johnson Paste Wax. I can finish turn in 4 to 8 weeks. I still get some that warp a little, which I don't like. Sometimes I get a crack but very rarely. I make my stuff to sell and I can't sell a cracked bowl. I will microwave something if I need it to dry quick. I weigh a turning and when it stops loosing weigh I consider it dry.
    Fred
    steercreekwood.com

  5. #5
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    Thanks everybody. I,m learning and seeing what works for me !!!!

  6. #6
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    Stupid question warning
    Obviously I know nothing about turning bowls and stuff.....Why do you turn wet wood then let it dry? Why not just turn dry wood??
    Faith, Hope & Charity

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Gibson View Post
    Why do you turn wet wood then let it dry? Why not just turn dry wood??
    A couple of points, green/wet wood turn very easy compared to dry wood. The second is $$$$, I have no idea how much a 12 X 16/4 blank would be if kiln dried but it would be a LOT higher than a tree you cut down or salvaged. Even larger bowl blanks that you do buy are most often wax coated and still green when you remove the wax.
    All tyranny needs to gain a foothold is for people of good conscience to remain silent. Thomas Jefferson

  8. #8
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    Bob, to add to what Mike said, if you air-dry a 12" x 12" x 6" chunk of wood, the chances are VERY high that it'll crack and be unusable for a bowl. Plus, it'll take several years to dry. On the other hand, if you rough-turn that block of wet wood into a bowl with 1" thick walls, it's much less likely to crack as it dries, since it'll have a bit of flexibility. (It may warp some, but once dried, you can re-mount it and make it round again since the walls still have some extra meat on them. Also, it'll dry in a few months instead of a few years.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vaughn McMillan View Post
    It depends somewhat on the wood species, the wall thickness, and the size of the piece. I've not turned much endgrain stuff, but IMO the Anchor Seal is probably not necessary. (Then again, I don't put Anchor Seal on any of my rough turnings. Heck, I've pretty much quit using DNA, too, since I have about the same 90% - 95% success rate without.)
    Would you be generous enough to share your rough process? I have a long list of various methods to try but have only turned a small # of bowls so only used the "pack in shavings and wrap in paper" technique which .. worked .. but had some clear downsides (a small amount of mold, took a relatively long time and I wasn't overly enthused with the crack/warp results and this wasn't end grain..).

    Bernie: Do you coat the entire bowl or just the outside + end grain like Fred?

  10. #10
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    Ryan, the process I use varies a bit depending on what I'm turning. Over the past couple of years, I've been working my way through a large haul of fresh mesquite. (At least it started out fresh a couple of years ago.) Mesquite is a wonder wood in that it doesn't move much when drying, so I generally turn it close to final dimensions and just let it dry in a paper bag. If it feels pretty dry, I'll often just turn it to finished dimensions and be done with it. If it's pretty damp to the touch, I'll put it in shavings, but if it's just a little moist, I just put it in the bag by itself and forget about it for a month or two. I've even successfully dried a few mesquite pieces by doing nothing more than leaving it sitting on the bench for a few weeks. If I'm turning something that moves more (like walnut or cherry), I'll put some shavings in the bag to help moderate the drying. If it's an important piece, I'll go ahead and put it in my DNA tub, then wrap it in a few layers of newspaper after it has soaked for a day or two. After about a month or so, it's generally dry enough to finish turning it.

    Keep in mind that my results in relatively dry Southern California will possibly be different than yours in Oregon. The fact that you had some mold on your wood indicates that your humidity is higher there. In a humid environment, I think the DNA probably helps things dry a bit more quickly. As far as warping and cracking goes, I think that's just a roll of the dice we all take. We walk the fine line between too thick (which makes things more likely to crack) or two thin (which can allow more warpage than can be turned out). I don't really have any hard and fast rules for that...I just play it by feel and experience. The common rule of thumb is leaving the walls about 10% of the bowl diameter, but that's just a guideline. Personally, I've never actually measured the walls or the diameter before deciding it's the right thickness.

    More and more though, I'll turn to finished dimensions and just let it do what it wants. Since almost everything I make it done with the intent to display it instead of use it, I usually don't mind some warping and/or cracking. Sometimes the results can be pretty cool. This is a piece of very wet madrone burl that I did that with a few years ago...



    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

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