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Thread: crosscutting little pieces

  1. #1
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    crosscutting little pieces

    I learned an unpleasant novice lesson yesterday when I tried to crosscut a thin strip on the miter saw which was set up because I was using it for other things. I had a strip about 3/4" X 1/2" by about 3'. When I tried to cut it, it jumped up and splintered. So how/where are you supposed to crosscut thin strips? I just took out a little hand saw and did it by hand..... Thanks folks.
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  2. #2
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    band saw?
    benedictione omnes bene

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    check out my etsy store, buroviejowoodworking

  3. #3
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    Been there done that. I'll bet that you cut thru the piece then lifted the blade back thru the cut. It was the lift back up that grabbed the piece and threw it. Try cutting thru and powering off without lifting back thru the cut and letting the saw come to a stop. If your saw has a brake you can apply it and stop the blade sooner. Never had a similar repeat of flying wood since, by using this method.

  4. #4
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    Robert describes the proper technique for any cut with a chop saw. Sure, you see the wood butchers hacking away with a CMS like lifting the handle back up was part of making the cut and they just can't lift it up fast enough. I imagine you are not doing work that would be OK with an end-cut that looks like a cartoon-exploded-cigar . A shop helper that solves the small end cuts getting launched into the twilight zone might also help with your thinner material. A sacraficial fence/base or a ZCI.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Also, many miter saws offer holddowns. I have a low-dollar DeWalt and gladly paid the $30 for the holddown as opposed to the alternative . I don't use the CMS often but, it is great for doing trimwork like baseboard and door molding. If I cut long thin stock often enough, I would keep it setup but, it has been relegated to a spot behind the jointer below the wall racks. I am glad he's there when I want him though .
    Last edited by glenn bradley; 11-07-2012 at 12:47 AM.
    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
    - Arthur C. Clarke

  5. #5
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    Thanks gentlemen. Yes, Glenn, a cartoon exploded cigar is exactly what it looked like. And yes, I always use a hold down......except this time.... Robert, you're right, I must have lifted the saw. Normally I always leave the saw down until the blade stops turning....except this time.... The more I'm in the shop, the more I see how accidents happen. And Dan, I don't have a BS yet...
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  6. #6
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    Cynthia i am going to suggest a completely different tack.

    Since i became more proficient in understanding and using my table saw, i think the better way to handle crosscutting small pieces is with a sled on the table saw.

    A good two sleds will do you a wonderful turn in that you can set it up to have a zero clearance insert and have two sides of a small piece well protected from blow out but also have hold downs which will get your hands away from the saw.

    I say two sleds because its worth having a large one for wide big pieces and a small one for smaller stock with hold downs etc.

    I have a dewalt sliding compound 12 inch chop saw with a good high tooth count blade and i still prefer the table saw for cross cuts. If i am doing some thing more in the line of construction type 2x work then i like my chop saw but i think the sled is a real neat way to go. You also control how much blade sticks out which is added safety bonus.

    For your info the sled would run with a guide in your saws mitre slot if you wanted to make one.
    cheers

  7. #7
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    No no you're all doing it wrong. You only have to get one of these http://www.bridgecitytools.com/defau...maker-pro.html and you're good to go. No other tool will do.

    I'd use a hand saw.



    Disclaimer: the joint maker is pretty cool and I'm not dissing it, but not having a money shrub in the back yard....

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ryan Mooney View Post
    No no you're all doing it wrong. You only have to get one of these http://www.bridgecitytools.com/defau...maker-pro.html and you're good to go. No other tool will do.

    I'd use a hand saw.



    Disclaimer: the joint maker is pretty cool and I'm not dissing it, but not having a money shrub in the back yard....
    Is that Bridge City stuff some kind of luxury tools for people who have unlimited funds to spend?
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  9. #9
    I don't use a SCMS for cutting little pieces. I use a table saw with a supplemental fence. Clamp a strip of wood, say a 1 x 3 to your fence and set it just short of the blade. Use a miter to hold the wood as you make the cut. When cut, the off-cut piece will sit out of the way and not be tempted to jump into the spinning blade because it won't be trapped between the blade and fence.

    If you would like, I'll set up my table saw and take a pic for you.

  10. #10
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    Yeah, Bruce, could I please see a picture of what you mean?
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