Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Nuts and bolts

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    The Gorge Area, Oregon
    Posts
    4,698

    Nuts and bolts

    Found this in another forum. Pretty interesting, the three links under the video are also worth following.
    http://www.boltscience.com/pages/junkertestvideo.htm

    Turns out using lock washers probably is a bad idea. Who'd a thunk.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    GTA Ontario Canada
    Posts
    12,251
    Its been my experience that the split ring lock washer is a waste of time especially when they not made from the correct material and dont have the right edge at the break to be able to bite into the surfaces.

    Very interesting video Ryan. The thing that comes into play here is also the ability of a manufacturer to work to decent tolerances when there are more than two holes in surfaces being connected together.

    I remember my Oneida Dust collector taking good stock of this issue with the use of the right sized holes, right bolts and proper nuts with the serrated underside being used to connect various parts of the cyclone.

    Now i wonder if this is the case in the cheaper stuff coming out of the east where as long as it looks right its percieved as having durability. Those nuts cost a fair bit more than the plain ole ones but this site you linked to proves they the correct engineering approach.
    cheers

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Delton, Michigan
    Posts
    17,471
    so what about jamb nuts, or locking nuts? are they also a waste of time?
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
    One hand washes the other!
    Don't put off today till tomorrow!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    The Gorge Area, Oregon
    Posts
    4,698
    Quote Originally Posted by larry merlau View Post
    so what about jamb nuts, or locking nuts? are they also a waste of time?
    No they can work well, but you have to do them right. The second link on the bottom of the page I posted before links to this: http://www.boltscience.com/pages/twonuts.htm which has a lot of good details on the correct way to do it (which I wasn't doing either ).

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Peshtigo, WI
    Posts
    11
    While I was doing my Millwright Apprenticeship,some twenty years ago, we had a gentleman come into class and give a demonstration on this exact same thing. He proved that lock washers were nothing but a warm fuzzy feeling for the people that used them. So we asked why are they made and sold if they don't work? His answer....because the customers want them.

    He also showed with another piece of equipment that it's more important to torque a threaded fastener to the proper specs if you don't want it to fall apart. And if the fastener is torqued to the proper specs once and disassembled it will break before being able to be retorqued to the proper specs the second time.

    Trouble is not everybody has a torque wrench handy when putting threaded fasteners together. And that's why they make all the anerobic thread lockers of various strengths.

    Jerry

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    GTA Ontario Canada
    Posts
    12,251
    Wow Ryan thanks again. I also had that thin thick nut thing completely wrong. Gotta get on phone to Dad he was a rigger after war and i think we need a chat on what he passed down. Gonna be a locking of the young buck old buck horns again and a good laugh when he capitulates. He never admits to being incorrect just bursts into a chuckle then i know.

    Thing about torque wrenches is the whole issue of quality again and then calibration. Its certainly an area where digital could play a bigger role in producing reasonable cost and accurate torque wrenches.


    Sent from my MB860 using Tapatalk 2
    cheers

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    The Gorge Area, Oregon
    Posts
    4,698
    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Keeble View Post
    Wow Ryan thanks again. I also had that thin thick nut thing completely wrong.

    Thing about torque wrenches is the whole issue of quality again and then calibration. Its certainly an area where digital could play a bigger role in producing reasonable cost and accurate torque wrenches.
    I think we all did Rob Having the proper torquing technique explained though it makes a lot more sense. I really like things like that that tell you all the why, cause even if I don't recall all that it seems to help the what stick in the brain.

    Agreed on quality, although I'm not totally convinced on the digital part in this case. A lot of old mechanical systems were remarkably precise and robust. Digital torsion meters can be pretty precise but aren't the most robust thing in the world from my very little experience. Imho, one more thing to break

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    The Gorge Area, Oregon
    Posts
    4,698
    More fun and excitement with nuts and bolts.
    http://snebulos.mit.edu/projects/ref...SA-RP-1228.pdf

    No I have no idea why I keep finding these sorts of things, it must be the obtuse company I hang around.

Similar Threads

  1. Just plain nuts
    By Brian McMillan in forum Off Topic Discussion
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 02-15-2012, 04:39 PM
  2. Gun nuts :)
    By Stephen Bellinger in forum Off Topic Discussion
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 07-14-2011, 10:02 AM
  3. my son is nuts
    By Frank Fusco in forum General Woodworking Q&A
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 07-06-2011, 06:57 PM
  4. Could you be as nuts as me?
    By Rob Keeble in forum Off Topic Discussion
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 02-06-2010, 01:49 PM
  5. T-nuts, or am I nuts?
    By Jim O'Dell in forum Carpentry and Construction
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 08-15-2007, 06:43 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •