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Thread: Building a Storehouse

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    Tokyo Japan
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    15,807

    Building a Storehouse

    The area on the first floor of our building was going to become the Dungeon metal working annex, but for now it will become a storage area, hopefully for my new business if I ever get it off the ground, but in the immediate future for some equipment from a very good customer who, at the end of this month will be moving their sushi shop to a new location and needs some space to store their fridges and some other stuff for a few months. They have been a customer for over 30 years and are great people, so when they asked us to store their stuff, we said yes. Now I have to build a couple of walls.

    I went to the DIY place and bought the first load of stuff..........



    ...... my micro van was FULL!

    Enough 2x4s and plywood to build the walls and insulation too. I will put a kind of concrete board on the outside and drywall on the inside. This is going to be very plain jane, but will do the job.


    The area behind the van that little green fence thing and all the way to the back wall will be the storage area. This will encompass the hatch to my Dungeon too, which is a good thing.


    another view


    You can see the door frame that I had made way back in 2001 when we built the building, that will hang the door that cover the main panel right now, you can see them behind the wooden crate there.


    You can see where the wall will go, right of the emergency light in the picture.


    I'm debating if I should get out the diamond wheel and cut into the tiles to bury the threshold of the door frame a bit, as I'll be bumping pallet jacks with crates on them in and out of that door a lot.

    Well here we go I have to do this in my off time, ha ha, and get it done soon, as we are coming up on the busiest time of the year for us, I have maybe a week to ten days to get it done, full steam ahead!

    ....gulp....
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
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    NH
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    +1 on getting out the diamond wheel and getting that thresh hold down into the tile.
    On another note the doors like that we have here that threshold is just to keep the door frame in the right place until it is installed than you remove it. Use-lay just a small spot weld on each side so they come off real easy.
    It could be worse You could be on fire.
    Stupid hurts.

  3. #3
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    Oct 2006
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    Tokyo Japan
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck Thoits View Post
    +1 on getting out the diamond wheel and getting that thresh hold down into the tile.
    On another note the doors like that we have here that threshold is just to keep the door frame in the right place until it is installed than you remove it. Use-lay just a small spot weld on each side so they come off real easy.
    This one is not like that, it it fully welded on and has the holes for keeping the second door closed, the little pins go into the holes, dunno what they are called.
    I really do think I'll be digging out the diamond wheel and making a hole for sure! Should I put some sort of mortar in the hole when I set the door frame in place? What do you think?

    I know I have to double up on the studs around the door frame, and a header over the door, but with these doors being really heavy, I'm thinking to maybe go one more? Any thoughts?

    Cheers!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  4. #4
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    Oct 2006
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    A questions for you all.

    I forgot to buy some felt, or building paper, the thick black stuff, that we would put down under the plate that runs along the ground, the bottom of the wall. This 2x4 will sit right on the tiles, do I need to have something there, or could I caulk it to seal it to the tile and not worry about it?

    VERY little moisture gets to this wall, only during a typhoon, maybe twice a year does this area of the first floor ever get even sort of wet, this is an exterior wall, but it is under cover and will almost never have direct rain fall, some rain might get blown on to the wall during a typhoon, but like I said, that might be twice a year.

    Do I need some felt under the studs?
    I should have bought PT studs to use as plates I guess......

    Cheers!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  5. #5
    Join Date
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    This will be a permanent structure. The walls are NOT load bearing in anyway, just to keep the riff-raff out.

    They don't sell sill seal here, and thought I was nuts for wanting to use it, PT studs were overkill according to the guy at the home center

    The sheething will be 12mm or about 1/2" and then house wrap white paper stuff, on top of that will be a 15mm cement board product called AT-Wall. I'm just going with basic grey to match the concrete walls. This stuff is guaranteed for 15 years.

    I did find some foam stuff they use for moving, it is about the 4" wide and has sticky tape on one side, it is only about 3/32" (2mm) thick but should do the job.

    I'll insulate with 4" (100mm) thick fibreglass bats between the studs, then 1/2" (12mm) drywall on the inside. Minimal electrical and only a couple of lights. I'll not mud or tape any drywall, nor will I paint it. If down the road it becomes an extention of my workshop, I can just unscrew some drywall and run more electrical.
    I will sink the threshold into the tiles, and the sill plates will get a bunch of big tapcons as well as the top plates, all into concrete.

    I should be waist deep into it by tomorrow, still getting my ducks in a row.
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  6. #6
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    Some starting pics

    Click image for larger version. 

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    That is how it looked when I started

    Click image for larger version. 

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    First short wall up

    Cheers
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Bellingham
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    Looks like it will be an interesting project. I look forward to seeing how it will turn out.
    “When love and skill work together, expect a masterpiece.” - John Ruskin
    “Nowadays people know the price of everything and the value of nothing.” - Oscar Wilde

  8. #8
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    Mar 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stuart Ablett View Post
    This one is not like that, it it fully welded on and has the holes for keeping the second door closed, the little pins go into the holes, dunno what they are called.
    I really do think I'll be digging out the diamond wheel and making a hole for sure! Should I put some sort of mortar in the hole when I set the door frame in place? What do you think?

    I know I have to double up on the studs around the door frame, and a header over the door, but with these doors being really heavy, I'm thinking to maybe go one more? Any thoughts?

    Cheers!
    It might be better to use high strength grout when you set that frame and one can never go wrong with extra studs.
    It could be worse You could be on fire.
    Stupid hurts.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    NH
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    4,006
    Quote Originally Posted by Stuart Ablett View Post
    I should have bought PT studs to use as plates I guess......

    Cheers!
    Yes. But you knew that anyways. they say kd studs should never come in contact with concrete. It rots them out from leaching the water out of the concrete.
    It could be worse You could be on fire.
    Stupid hurts.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Tokyo Japan
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    15,807
    I was all ready to start at 8AM, then some stuff happend to push my start time back to 10:45AM, sigh....

    I did have a good day, got a good start, and I hope to be done this job quickly, really I HAVE TO be done quickly.


    The start.


    First studs up.



    First sheathing.


    Corner detail, this will give me a strong corner and a nailing surface for the drywall on the inside, and room to stuff insulation as well.


    Part two of the wall.


    my messy worksite, I was pressed for time.


    An insider's view.


    Done for today, I hope to get the majority of the outside done by Friday.

    I can honestly say, I'm looking forward to a HOT bath tonight!

    I hope to go and buy the drywall on Saturday, and the outside concrete board stuff on Monday, the little truck can't handle both at one time!

    Cheers!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

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