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Thread: Turnips and Cows

  1. #1

    Turnips and Cows

    We here in the SW corner of Missouri (so did other parts of the US) had a really bad drought and I noticed the field next us had an abundant crop of what appeared to be mustards of some sort growing. I know that several state conservation agencies have recommended planting member of the Cruciferae family for deer. This surprised me because the local deer have plenty of food and this farmer is not known for good conservation practices.
    This what I saw when I drove by the field yesterday. This is posted for the fun of it. Not calling anyone a turnip. LOL
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    Remember the tea kettle - it is always up to its neck in hot water, yet it
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  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Gallian View Post
    We here in the SW corner of Missouri (so did other parts of the US) had a really bad drought and I noticed the field next us had an abundant crop of what appeared to be mustards of some sort growing. I know that several state conservation agencies have recommended planting member of the Cruciferae family for deer. This surprised me because the local deer have plenty of food and this farmer is not known for good conservation practices.
    This what I saw when I drove by the field yesterday.
    Longer tubers like this also tend to de-compact the soil and bring up nutrients from lower down than most grass will (there are other similarly shaped plants folks use as well, but I don't recall the specific benefits of each). Funny, I hadn't seen the older usage of Cruciferae but knew them as part of Brassicaceae, perhaps a difference of backgrounds more than anything. Either way given the intestinal output from the cabbage family I'd wager than in a day or three you wouldn't want to light a match near that field

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Gallian View Post
    This is posted for the fun of it. Not calling anyone a turnip. LOL
    Apologies in advance for the bad pun!... Indeed that would be a rude-a-baga thing to do

  3. #3
    Ryan, My doctoral Professor insisted that the family should be called Cruciferae but Brassicaceae was acceptable in the taxonomy circles.. Taxonomy is not what it was and guess I am still old school. I worked real hard and got many letters after my name but other than a few books I never really used my degrees in Botany. But I did use my computer science training. Ryan I really appreciate your post.... i.e. four petals like the cross (crucifix like) is a key characteristic of the family. you noticed that the tops were the only parts eaten.
    Remember the tea kettle - it is always up to its neck in hot water, yet it
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    Paul, as I understand the process of grazing turnips (which we might be doing an experiment on next year here), the tops are the delicious and edible part now. After a freeze, the sugars in the turnips change it somehow (I am not digging through my Feeds & Feeding books now). The turnips then after a freeze or for rest of the winter become a delicacy and sought after by the cows and deer. So it is supposed to be a twofold process.
    Jon

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  6. #6
    Thanks Jonathan, I watched the field of turnips grow and did not see it planted in his hay field. I had a feeling that it had somehow volunteered seeded because of the dry season. We only got one hay cut this year. and it really surprised me to see the turnips above ground. also Jonathan we never dug garden turnips until after a freeze. Sweeter that way. I do understand some of the Carb/sugar change but it has been awhile for my pea size brain.
    Bob: bring the carrots and we will have a feast -- I bet Jay would even join us!
    Remember the tea kettle - it is always up to its neck in hot water, yet it
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Gallian View Post
    Ryan, My doctoral Professor insisted that the family should be called Cruciferae but Brassicaceae was acceptable in the taxonomy circles.. Taxonomy is not what it was and guess I am still old school. I worked real hard and got many letters after my name but other than a few books I never really used my degrees in Botany. But I did use my computer science training. Ryan I really appreciate your post.... i.e. four petals like the cross (crucifix like) is a key characteristic of the family. you noticed that the tops were the only parts eaten.
    Ah, didn't know you had a degree in botany as well, cool. I was figuring the preference for Cruciferae was from the doctoral studies

    I'd guess that once the tops are gone they'll get more interested in the roots, cows can be picky eaters to. As Jonathan noted freezing does sweeten them so that would make them tastier as well (this is why you leave parsnips in the ground until after hard freeze as well, makes them way more delicious).

    Be interesting to watch and see.

  8. #8
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    Oh and I think calling yourself "old school" might be slightly pre-emptive.

    http://shortn.me/iMJg (http://books.google.com/ngrams/ - Cruciferae,Brassicaceae,Brassica on the off chance my shorten fails)

    Looks like we're just past the tipping point in popular usage for the scientific usage. I added the vulgar form brassica just from curiosity.

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    Turnups are something that is in a lot of plot food bags for deer. They will dig them up later in the winter.
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Gallian View Post
    Thanks Jonathan, I watched the field of turnips grow and did not see it planted in his hay field. I had a feeling that it had somehow volunteered seeded because of the dry season. We only got one hay cut this year. and it really surprised me to see the turnips above ground. also Jonathan we never dug garden turnips until after a freeze. Sweeter that way. I do understand some of the Carb/sugar change but it has been awhile for my pea size brain.
    Bob: bring the carrots and we will have a feast -- I bet Jay would even join us!
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