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Thread: Non black "ebonizing" solution

  1. #1
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    Non black "ebonizing" solution

    Does anybody know of other solutions that can be used to dye/ color wood. I know how to make the black ebonizing solution with vinegar and steel wool. Any solutions or chemicals for red, grey, brown, etc.

  2. #2
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    Transtint?
    Jim D.
    Adapt, Improvise, Overcome!

  3. #3
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    I fumed a piece of purple heart in ammonia once just messing around. It turned green. I'll see if I can fined the pictures. I've also heard that a lye solution will "age" cherry. I've never done it before. Ammonia will give it that aged look though. I fumed a cherry chest once and it looked great. I'll see if I can find those pics as well.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim DeLaney View Post
    Transtint?
    I forgot to mention that I wanted something that will react with the wood hopefully giving some variation in the color.

  5. #5
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    What kind of wood?
    Aqua Fortis acid a/k/a AF, will darken maple and bring out figure. I like to dilute it and apply a little at a time until the desired degree of dark and figure is achieved then wash with a weak base solution to stop the action. Used on fine gunstocks a lot.
    "Folks is funny critters."

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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Fusco View Post
    What kind of wood?
    Aqua Fortis acid a/k/a AF, will darken maple and bring out figure. I like to dilute it and apply a little at a time until the desired degree of dark and figure is achieved then wash with a weak base solution to stop the action. Used on fine gunstocks a lot.
    Quarter sawn red oak in this case, but I was looking just in general. I would like to expand my finishing knowledge.

  7. #7
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    i was reading in one of my magazines the other night, don't remember which one, but this guy used dyes for coloring leather for ebonizing. perhaps that is something to be looked into, as the dyes come in different colors.
    benedictione omnes bene

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  8. #8
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    i had to return to the scene of the crime so to speak, and i found where the item i mentioned was located. it's in the december fine woodworking, in the letters section. the person in question used fierberg's professional oil dye, normally used on leather, goes on like a regular oil stain, does not raise the grain, and dries in a few minutes. hope that helps.
    benedictione omnes bene

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    check out my etsy store, buroviejowoodworking

  9. #9
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    Ill look into some of this stuff, might try ammonia

  10. #10
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    There are a number of chemicals that can be used for different colors but many of them have health problems. I took a course several years ago on the subject and still have some of the chemicals (don't remember a lot of the details, however), but when I want to color something, I buy dye. It's more reliable and safer, and you can get a lot more colors. You can choose water based (raises grain) or alcohol based for most dyes.

    Mike

    [Regarding "aging" cherry: You can do it with lye but I find that if you're willing to wait six months, you get the same "darkness" but the color is more pleasing than the aged color. Put your cherry project where it will get some sun, or even just some strong light, and it'll darken pretty quickly. Just leave it outside in the sun for a couple of days (take it in at night:-) and you'll be amazed at how much it darkens. Cherry sapwood never darkens.]
    Last edited by Mike Henderson; 12-08-2012 at 07:28 PM.
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