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Thread: Grizzly Slipit vs. Boeshield???

  1. #1
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    Grizzly Slipit vs. Boeshield???

    Grizzly Slipit vs. Boeshield???

    In an email discussion with Grizzly to resolve some tuning questions I had, the tech guy recommended the use of G5562 SlipIt Silicone free sliding compound for the table top and the G5563 Woodworker’s Tool Lube for the saw blade. He stated not to use a wax and not to use any product that contain silicone as they could find their way into the wood & then affect the finishing of the wood. His exact words: "Wax is not recommended for the table surface as it can change how a stain is finish coats the wood. We recommend the G5562 Slip It Silicone free sliding compound. This gel applies similar to a paste wax and will seal and protect cast iron surfaces. We also recommend the use of the G5563 Woodworker’s Tool Lube to lubricate your bandsaw blades."

    I've read several posts that recommend using a wax & others that recommend Boeshield T-9 for the table surface to "slick" it up. For those of you that have used the Boeshield and the Grizzly Slipit compound, how would you compare them? And, which do you prefer, the gel or the spray? I like a spray, but if working the gel into the "pores" would work better, it should last longer.

    Finally, the G5563 Woodworker’s Tool Lube is described online as "This cast iron table sealant and bit and cutting blade lubricant reduces sliding friction and hang-ups. Repels moisture and dirt and inhibits rust while preventing resin build-up. Out performs paste wax and contains no silicone or CFC's." So why wouldn't this also work for both the table & the blade?

    Thanks,
    Al
    Thoughts entering one's mind need not exit one's mouth!
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  2. #2
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    A lot of guys use wax on their saw and planer tables and like it. I'm not one of them though. The possibility of getting wax into my wood and messing with the finish makes me a bit nervous. I use "top saver" to clean and lubricate all my metal tool tables. I reapply every month. I've recently found a teflon lubricant that I use on my planer tables. I really like it.
    I've never used a bandsaw blade lubricant before. The thought never crossed my mind. I do round over the back of the blade though. It will be interesting to see if anyone else uses a blade lubricant.
    Faith, Hope & Charity

  3. #3
    Bob,

    I bought some of the blade lubricant but haven't used it yet....
    Ken
    ------



  4. #4
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    Your preference may have to do with the weather or your local environment. That's just a wild guess as I have used Johnson's Paste Wax for years. Slick surfaces, no rust and never an effect on material when it comes time to finish. I only need to replenish 2 or 3 times a year if I do a good cleaning with mineral spirits to remove the previous coats and then lay down 2 or 3 coats, buffing between coats.

    It is always good to remember that one of the things that makes this forum so great is that you get input from many folks who do many different types of woodworking in many areas on the planet. That being said, Boeshield's T-9 is a bit gummy and not really very slippery at all in my shop in SoCal. I know that many folks swear by T-9 and I assume there is a variable that makes one product work better for some and another product work well for others.

    I haven't tried blade lube but do sometimes touch a bit of paraffin to the blade if I am doing a lot of tall re-sawing. I do stone the back of the blades when new but, really just run them after that. I do agree that you should avoid silicone products but, petroleum products have never caused me any grief.
    Last edited by glenn bradley; 01-06-2013 at 03:15 AM.
    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
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  5. #5
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    Paste wax gets used on all my machines and I never had any issues. My shop is a business and the machines see alot of wood. I tried the slip it and didnt care for it. Paste wax worked just as good and alot cheaper.

  6. #6
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    I've used T-9 before and like Glenn it ended up being a little gummy. I had to really buff it to get rid of the sticky. It wasn't very slick even then. I went over the top of the T-9 with Johnson's to get a slick surface.

  7. #7
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    I'm with John. I use Johnson's over the T-9 and works great. T-9 probably ain't needed but a little added insurance can't hurt.
    If you don't take pride in your work, life get's pretty boring.

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  8. #8
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    Well, it looks like I opened Pandora's Box once again. The response are all great, providing information I wasn't aware of.
    • I wasn't aware of the effect the weather environment would have on the product.
    • I wasn't aware that Boeshield T-9 was gummy & not so slippery.
    • I was inclined to try Grizzly Slipit based on Grizzly's recommendation from a tech rep, but after the marginal reviews (http://www.amazon.com/Grizzly-G5562-...owViewpoints=1), and not hearing this as being a popular treatment that you guys typically use, I'm now less inclined to try it.
    • I wasn't aware of "Top Saver". It has some pretty positive reviews (http://www.amazon.com/Top-Saver-Rust.../dp/B001DT12XQ). It is also expensive, but apparently very effective, from the reviews & from Bob's personal experience. I've seen his shop & his work, so that lends a lot of first hand credence to the product. All of his equipment were in good shape, he obviously takes good care of his toys.
    • My "weather environment" should be pretty good, considering that it's in my basement next to the utility room where the furnace is located. So, I don't see humidity as a problem during the cool season, plus I use a dehumidifier during the summer which keeps the humidity ~ 40%. My table saw & drill press CI tables haven't succembed to rust & I haven't treated them at all.
    • Also, thinking more on what I'll really be doing with wood, at least for the short term, I'm not looking to build furniture grade product, just the occasional project resulting from necessity, or a casual project whim, so I don't anticipate the "finishing" problems from using a wax, or other materials on the saw table. I don't have a jointer, or planer, or other equipment needed for high quality work. Right now, I only have a Bird House & a Lawn Glide Swing on the list, along with a few jigs that I've noticed on FWW. Being the "practical" (aka frugal) guy that I sometimes am, it would seem to make more sense for me to try a paste wax, as suggested above, until I get into more sophisticated wor & have the toys to support it. When that time comes, I could strip the wax & apply something else. I think getting Top Saver would be more appropriate then.


    Thanks guys! Once again you've given me some good advice based on knowledgeable experience.
    Thoughts entering one's mind need not exit one's mouth!
    As I age my memory fades .... and that's a load off my mind!

    "We Live In The Land Of The Free, Only Because Of The Brave"
    “The problems we face today are there because the people who work for a living are outnumbered by those who vote for a living."
    "
    Socialism is a philosophy of failure, the creed of ignorance, and the gospel of envy, its inherent virtue is the equal sharing of misery." Winston Churchill

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by glenn bradley View Post
    ...I do stone the back of the blades when new but, really just run them after that. ...
    One more user of paste furniture wax on my tables and bandsaw blades. When a table is new, the wax "soaks in" so it requires several coats, and renewal after a week or two. As the table ages, I only rewax every 6-12 months or less - when it seems less slippery.

    I have heard that rounding the back of the blade is helpful, but do not do it on Lenox carbide blades - they are rounded at the factory, and if you do it, that voids any warranty (although I have never had a warranty claim on a bandsaw blade).
    Last edited by Charlie Plesums; 01-06-2013 at 03:25 PM. Reason: Added frequency of application
    Charlie Plesums, Austin Texas
    (Retired early to become a custom furnituremaker)
    Lots of my free advice at www.solowoodworker.com

  10. #10
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    well i have used wax and slpit and have no troubles with either and am another that doesnt like boeshild or t9..
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