Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14

Thread: SnackPin Scrap Wood Project

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Yorktown, Virginia
    Posts
    5,015

    SnackPin Scrap Wood Project

    Here's an easy project that you can put to good use in the kitchen, or add to your craft show arsenal. It's my take on a clothes pin style snack keeper. I made several of these years ago. I ran across some partially completed blanks while cleaning up today and discovered I couldn't remember how I made them. Here is how I reconstructed the crime. Apologies for the iphone pics.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Pin-9 (Small).jpg 
Views:	77 
Size:	88.9 KB 
ID:	73338
    It starts with a blank about 8" long by 1-1/4" square. On the band saw, cut a 3/16" wide kerf about 4-1/2" long into one end of the blank to create the two pin legs. Cut a set of duck lips on the legs, then insert a 1-1/2" long piece of scrap the same width as the kerf into the end and tack in place with a drop of CA glue, as shown. You will be removing this later, so don't get carried away.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Pin-1 (Small).jpg 
Views:	79 
Size:	79.6 KB 
ID:	73331
    Mount the blank and turn the end that will be the the head of the pin round to fit in the small jaws of whatever chuck you have. I use a Steb center and the cone from my Oneway live center to do this. The cone centers the block. I don't want to put a lot of pressure on the waste wood at this point.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Pin-3 (Small).jpg 
Views:	74 
Size:	97.2 KB 
ID:	73333
    Mount the blank in your chuck and use the waste block to stabilize the blank with your tail stock. Rough the pin round. I'm using a cup point in the tail stock here because the oneway point was a bit large.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Pin-4 (Small).jpg 
Views:	68 
Size:	88.2 KB 
ID:	73334
    Lay out your design. I turn the body of the pin down to about 3/4".
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Pin-5 (Small).jpg 
Views:	67 
Size:	88.2 KB 
ID:	73335
    And turn, turn, turn, sand, sand , sand. If you are good with a skew you won't have to do much.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Pin-6 (Small).jpg 
Views:	66 
Size:	94.6 KB 
ID:	73340
    I add a coat of Mahoney's Utility finish at this point while the lathe is spinning. Then cut the blank off and touch up the end with sand paper.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Pin-7 (Small).jpg 
Views:	68 
Size:	95.4 KB 
ID:	73336
    A twist of a small skew pops out the waste wood and a little touch up on the lips and inside the kerf with a fine file and some sand paper...
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Pin-8 (Small).jpg 
Views:	69 
Size:	70.2 KB 
ID:	73337
    and she's read for snacks
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Pin-10 (Small).jpg 
Views:	90 
Size:	106.2 KB 
ID:	73339
    Certainly other methods of work can achieve the same results. Do whatever works for you.

    Happy snacking!
    (Mods..I can't figure out how to get rid of this orphan attachment. If you can remove it, thanks.

    [Got it handled - Vaughn]
    Last edited by Ted Calver; 01-25-2013 at 08:50 PM. Reason: clarity

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Goodland, Kansas
    Posts
    4,834
    That is just cool Ted. I guess that will go on my to do list.
    Bernie W.

    Retirement: Thats when you return from work one day
    and say, Hi, Honey, Im home forever.

    To succeed in life, you need three things: a wishbone, a backbone and a funnybone.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    The Gorge Area, Oregon
    Posts
    4,699
    Very cool idea... Added to the "getting rid of the scrap pile" list, I'm sure I can give some of these away!!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Billings Missouri near Springfield Mo
    Posts
    4,552
    I like it
    A Turn N Time
    Components for John Smith Organs and the Hobby Organ Builder

    Frog Pond Guitars


    Before you criticize someone, you should walk a mile in their shoes. That way, when you criticize them, you're a mile away and you have their shoes.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Reno NV
    Posts
    13,360
    Miles above and beyond the plastic version and quite stylish!
    Programmer - An organism that turns coffee into software.
    If all your friends are exactly like you, What an un-interesting life it must be.
    "A door is what a dog is perpetually on the wrong side of" Ogden Nash


  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    ABQ NM
    Posts
    30,015
    Very cool, Ted. Thanks for posting the how-to.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Tokyo Japan
    Posts
    15,807
    I've seen the plastic ones, not impressed, but I'd not seen the wooden version, very nice indeed!

    I guess it is important to have straight grained wood and to choose which axis you but the slot on.

    I'd love to figue out an easy way to turn the inside of the tip of your pin, it looks fine now, but that area just begs for a nice bit of work with the spindle gouge

    Thanks for taking the tim Ted, on my list of "To Do" as well.

    Cheers!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    DSM, IA
    Posts
    5,719
    I'll be trying this out soon, thanks Ted!
    A man is rich in proportion to the number of things he can afford to let alone. -Henry David Thoreau
    My Website


  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Yorktown, Virginia
    Posts
    5,015
    Thanks all for the kind comments. I had not seen any of these before, but way back when, I remember someone?? mentioning that he made a clothespin style snack keeper for craft shows and they sold well. I don't know whether his were turned or flat. Recently, we were cleaning out the MIL's house and I stumbled on her bag of wooden clothes pins and noticed several styles. In addition to the round ones, there was a flat style that caught my eye that would also lend itself to scaling up a bit and would make a good band saw/scroll saw project.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	pins.jpg 
Views:	23 
Size:	44.3 KB 
ID:	73353

    Quote Originally Posted by Stuart Ablett View Post
    ....I guess it is important to have straight grained wood and to choose which axis you but the slot on.
    I'd love to figue out an easy way to turn the inside of the tip of your pin, it looks fine now, but that area just begs for a nice bit of work with the spindle gouge ....
    Very important point on grain orientation Stu, thanks for bringing that up. Let us know if you figure out how to fancy up the tip.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Reno, Nv
    Posts
    3,632
    Great imagination Ted!! Cool "How-to" to boot. Adding to the "to do" list.
    Your Respiratory Therapist wears Combat boots

Similar Threads

  1. rifle vise - simple scrap wood project.
    By Frank Fusco in forum Flatwork Project Showcase
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 04-06-2012, 05:10 PM
  2. Scrap Wood Re-Visited
    By Bob Wiggins in forum General Woodworking Q&A
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 09-05-2009, 11:30 AM
  3. Best Use of Scrap Wood - Voting
    By KaLea Thoits in forum Giveaways, Contests, and Swaps
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 03-07-2009, 02:10 AM
  4. Scrap wood special.
    By Royall Clark in forum General Woodworking Q&A
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 02-28-2009, 09:13 PM
  5. Some More of Robert's Scrap Wood
    By Vaughn McMillan in forum Lathe Project Showcase
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 04-22-2008, 03:56 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •