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Thread: Need some advice on staining this trim

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2009
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    Need some advice on staining this trim

    I'm adding some simple pine trim to an area of my home. I have my pieces cut and fitted now I'm ready to stain them to match some cabinets. I'm using some Min wax wood finish. I cut myself a few "samples" of the trim to try my finish on in order to make sure it matched the excising stained cabinets. When I apply the stain I get this double shade of colors. The wood trim is not spliced or pieced together....this is just weird. My question is if I applied some wood sealer...would it stain more evenly?
    Photo is of the samples pieces. One stained and the other not. These were cut from the same trim board. You can see how the stained piece on the right is taking the stain in two different ways. Why?

    Click image for larger version. 

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    It's not what you achieve in life...It's what you overcome!

  2. #2
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    Pine needs sealing.
    ++++++

    Some say the land of milk and honey; others say the land of fruits and nuts. All together my sort of heaven.

    Power is not taken. It is given. Who have you given yours to? Hmmmm?

    Carol Reed

  3. #3
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    i am not sure its pine,, maybe its something else, popular maybe? but it acts like sapwood vrs heartwood
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  4. #4
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    2 things about what your doing.
    1. It does not look like pine.
    2. If it is and you want to match an old pine natural finish there is a simple way to do it. But I would want to if that is so befote I go into the procedure. If not you can seal it with 40 percent shellac 10 percent BLO
    AND 50 percent alcohol. Brush on , wipe off excess after a few seconds. Let dry and then stain.
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  5. #5
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    I guess I assumed it was pine. Popular may be correct though. I may have a can of sealer somewhere. I'll give it a try
    It's not what you achieve in life...It's what you overcome!

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carol Reed View Post
    Pine needs sealing.
    Why do you say pine needs sealing?
    It could be worse You could be on fire.
    Stupid hurts.

  7. #7
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    The difference in the size of the cells between summer growth and winter growth is vast, so color absorbs differently. To achieve some uniformity, sealing is needed.
    ++++++

    Some say the land of milk and honey; others say the land of fruits and nuts. All together my sort of heaven.

    Power is not taken. It is given. Who have you given yours to? Hmmmm?

    Carol Reed

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carol Reed View Post
    The difference in the size of the cells between summer growth and winter growth is vast, so color absorbs differently. To achieve some uniformity, sealing is needed.
    Is that what I'm seeing on this wood? Different growth cells?
    It's not what you achieve in life...It's what you overcome!

  9. #9
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    Depends on the wood, Tom. The cell size is especially an issue with soft woods. Hardwoods that are face sawn, as opposed to quarter sawn, can present this problem too. The cell can be sliced at an angle that accepts more or less color. Sealing is easy and inexpensive.
    ++++++

    Some say the land of milk and honey; others say the land of fruits and nuts. All together my sort of heaven.

    Power is not taken. It is given. Who have you given yours to? Hmmmm?

    Carol Reed

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carol Reed View Post
    The difference in the size of the cells between summer growth and winter growth is vast, so color absorbs differently. To achieve some uniformity, sealing is needed.
    For me I don't mind the color disparity but Pine also has a bad habit of blotching horribly across big sections of the board (due to slight variations in sanding quality or wood density or just plain pine in a pain). Even with "conditioner" I still have problems with pine blotching (I haven't tried Daves formula but odds are close to 100% that it would work better )

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