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Thread: Raised Panel Door

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Raised Panel Door

    I am in the midst of working on a cabinet with shelves for my family room. Usually before I build something I have never done before, I make a practice run. This raised panel door is my practice run for the 3 doors that I will be making for my cabinet. I made this from pine. It was done using a set of rail and stile router bits that I picked up from Rockler. The panel was raised using a horizontal panel raising bit, again from Rockler.

    side note:
    -- you might have noticed that I get a lot of stuff from Rockler, it just that they have a store about 25 minutes from my house, so its a matter of convenience. When it comes to router bits and the like, i prefer to buy them in person.
    We create with our hands in wood what our mind sees in thought.
    Disclosure: Formerly was a part-time sales person & instructor at WoodCraft in Buffalo, NY.
    www.tinyurl.com/thewoodshoppe

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Looks great Sean, I got my RP bits from Rockler too, and I made some practice doors as well.............


    Pine rails and stiles, and a lamcore plywood panel, worked well.

    Cheers!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  3. #3
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    Mar 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stuart Ablett View Post
    Looks great Sean, I got my RP bits from Rockler too, and I made some practice doors as well.............


    Pine rails and stiles, and a lamcore plywood panel, worked well.

    Cheers!
    Stuart,

    Did you have any problem with tear out when you raised the plywood panel? Also was that horizontal or vertical panel rasing bit? Did it have a back cutter?

    My panel raising bit is horizontal without a back cutter. After doing this practice panel, I determined that I will need to run the stock for the panel through my planer to take it down by about a 1/16 of an inch. This will give me the look that I want, as far as how much the center of the panel protrudes. I suppose that I could rabbet the edges (to create a back cut) in place of this step.
    We create with our hands in wood what our mind sees in thought.
    Disclosure: Formerly was a part-time sales person & instructor at WoodCraft in Buffalo, NY.
    www.tinyurl.com/thewoodshoppe

  4. #4
    Steve Clardy Guest
    I used to rabbit the back of all my 3/4 panels, so the front was flush with the frame.
    I now just surface my panels down to 5/8", eliminating the need for the rabbit on back. Plus it lightens the hardwood doors a lot.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    Tokyo Japan
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    Sean, sound like you have the same bit set up that I do, no back cutter, and I don't need one, I, like Steve, make my panels a bit thinner than the rails and stiles.

    Yeah, the Lamcore plywood tore out badly, but it was just for practice.

    Do you have a VS control on your router?

    Without this, I did not have much success making clean cuts, but with one, the cuts were good!


    These doors are Ash, I like them, and so does my lovely wife, so I'm good to go!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  6. #6
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    Mar 2007
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    Stuart,

    I like the Ash door, very Nice ... what does it go to?

    I have a Dewalt DW618 router (fixed and plunge bases). It is a VS router, with soft start. I have the fixed base mounted in my router table, and I use the plunge for any thing that I can't do on the table.

    When you raised the plywood panel, did you set the router speed low or high?
    We create with our hands in wood what our mind sees in thought.
    Disclosure: Formerly was a part-time sales person & instructor at WoodCraft in Buffalo, NY.
    www.tinyurl.com/thewoodshoppe

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
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    Floydada, Tx
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    Sean, That door looks great. The joints are tight. Hopefully I will get a router that accepts 1/2" shank bits this summer.

  8. #8
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    oswego county , upstate n.y.
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    hi sean

    the bigger the swing of the bit the slower you want to go . if you measure the speed of the bit in miles per hour a flush trim bit is doing 1000 miles an hour but the raised panel bit at the same setting is doing 20,000 miles an hour. because the tip of the raised panel bit is that much farther from the arbor shaft it covers more ground faster. hope i didn't confuse ya
    what are you building today ??

    GRIZZLY

  9. #9
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    Sean, what Jim said!

    Just about as slow as it can go, my router is a Hitachi M12 (Not the M12V) I have an external VS controller, it only goes down to 70%, it works, but a bit slower would be better.

    The plywood did now tear out that bad, but then this is BAD plywood. If you want CHEAP panel inserts, say you are doing paint grade, use MDF.

    Cheers!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  10. #10
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by jim capozzi View Post
    hi sean

    the bigger the swing of the bit the slower you want to go . if you measure the speed of the bit in miles per hour a flush trim bit is doing 1000 miles an hour but the raised panel bit at the same setting is doing 20,000 miles an hour. because the tip of the raised panel bit is that much farther from the arbor shaft it covers more ground faster. hope i didn't confuse ya
    Jim,

    That does make sense, that I would want to use a slower speed for a larger diameter bit.

    One question though, does the speed make a difference depending on the wood being routed? Say will pine be better on a higher speed than oak? Also, isn't there a higher posibility of burning the wood at a slower speed?
    We create with our hands in wood what our mind sees in thought.
    Disclosure: Formerly was a part-time sales person & instructor at WoodCraft in Buffalo, NY.
    www.tinyurl.com/thewoodshoppe

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