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Thread: Crack filling question

  1. #1
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    Crack filling question

    ok i have a fine crack that wouldnt close up last night, got more than one but this is what i am referring to so i ask the forum as to how to fill this fine void to make it less noticeable,, how would you folks do it,, charlie i hope your still here because i would like to hear your thoughts on this..
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    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
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    Don't put off today till tomorrow!

  2. #2
    IMHO, filling it is only going to make it more noticeable, unless you're going to paint this project. I would take it apart, plane the edges completely flat, and glue it again.

  3. #3
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    bruce, this was flat i believe, checked it before the glue up, used a rabbet plane and jointer for edges, i think its hydraulics from glue giving me fits.. this is a large rabbet joint. 58" long, looking to have two more to do and am looking at chamfer the inside corner to relieve the hydraulics some. also what glue would you use to help with the next batch, this was done with titebond 1 and i have tried out some tite bond three last night to see if it was any different on some scrap, it appears to dry brown like plasitic resin glue???
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    Last edited by larry merlau; 02-24-2013 at 04:47 PM.
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
    One hand washes the other!
    Don't put off today till tomorrow!

  4. #4
    How did you clamp it Larry? Did you use a caul to help apply pressure evenly along the joint? I'll sometimes rub some glue in the joint and immediately sand the joint to embed the fine dust in it.

    When you say jointer you mean the floor model one right cause I would never touch that joint with a hand tool if I had a power tool to do it.

    As for the rabbet I would ruff cut that on the table saw and either clean it up on a shaper or the router table.

    That lock miter bit is starting to look pretty good now.

  5. #5
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    Well I would be using tight bond 2 Take your glue and fill the crack with it. Force it in with your finger than before it dries sand it with an RO sander. The spinning of the sander forces the saw dust into the glue/crack. Make sure you sand off all the glue residue from the surface.
    It could be worse You could be on fire.
    Stupid hurts.

  6. #6
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    Yha what Alan said.
    It could be worse You could be on fire.
    Stupid hurts.

  7. #7
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    I agree on the chamfer as a pressure relief. Since you used rabbet or shoulder planes to assure a good fit prior to glue up, it is most assuredly the glues volume causing your problem. There is nothing more disappointing than a starved joint but, with that much long grain surface contact, I am OK spreading a tissue paper thin film of glue the length of the joint. I then position the parts and sue many, many small clamps to "snug" thing into position. I then start at one end and walk the tightening to full pressure along as I go, adjusting/assuring a proper fit as I go.
    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alan Bienlein View Post
    How did you clamp it Larry? Did you use a caul to help apply pressure evenly along the joint? I'll sometimes rub some glue in the joint and immediately sand the joint to embed the fine dust in it.

    When you say jointer you mean the floor model one right cause I would never touch that joint with a hand tool if I had a power tool to do it.

    As for the rabbet I would ruff cut that on the table saw and either clean it up on a shaper or the router table.

    That lock miter bit is starting to look pretty good now.
    alan,, your not funny and yes it is and i will be getting a large 45 degree chamfer bit.. the one i have is for a small 3/4 cut height not enough.. and i have used the saw dust trick before but like bruce said some of this glue clear to the top,, so i will do some magic if can with the coloring of it later.. character is good right maybe the customer is blind they already said it was fine as is but that isnt what i will leave it as.
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
    One hand washes the other!
    Don't put off today till tomorrow!

  9. #9
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    Im not a pro, never represented myself as anything but an amateur, my biggest quandary in woodworking is just where larry is at now with his seam.
    Do I, or dont I? touch it up, leave it alone, maybe make it more noticable?
    cant figure out exactly where the line is to attempt a correction.
    Human Test Dummy

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by allen levine View Post
    Im not a pro, never represented myself as anything but an amateur, my biggest quandary in woodworking is just where larry is at now with his seam.
    Do I, or dont I? touch it up, leave it alone, maybe make it more noticable?
    cant figure out exactly where the line is to attempt a correction.
    All I can say on that Allen is I go thru the same thought process. If it's not really going to show then I don't worry about something like that. Then when you do decide to fix it you really need to keep notes on what you did so that if something goes wrong or comes out right you know what you did.

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