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Thread: Re-saw question

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2011
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    Re-saw question

    ok, I know this isnt rocket science but here is my dilema.

    Im estimating a project for a client and one part of the project is going to be an L shaped counter 9 feet on one leg and 11 feet on the other. The client is requesting antique chestnut.
    I have a feeling finding 8/4 rough stock in my area at reasonable cost may be a bit of a challenge but finding some beams may afford me more options.
    Now, to be able to resaw a couple beams of the above lengths is the challenge.
    I have an 18" Rikon bandsaw with a 2hp motor, and presently have a 1-1/2" blade for resawing which I have resawn 10" thick maple with ease but only short lengths.
    Handling beams is an entirely new dimension. Ive worked out the support etc but controlling drift over such a long length is my concern.
    Anyone done this before? Any suggestions?
    He who laughs last, thinks slowest

  2. #2
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    Oct 2006
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    You can do this, but you will have to pay a lot of attention to the set up, the support needs to be very good, you need one good flat surface on the beam. If you have a fence, your fence needs to end at the back of the blade, it should not extend any more than that. I have cut fairly long beams on my resaw and the biggest point is having the set up correct. If you cannot make one side of the beam flat, then make up a long sled that you can attach the beam too. You will have to cut it a bit thicker because that old beam might have stress in it and it might twist, cup or ???

    The bandsaw you have is certainly capable, if the blade is sharp and you set up correctly it will just take time.

    Good luck, take pictures!

    PS having some PAM cooking spray on hand to lube the blade as you cut is not a bad idea, sometimes the stress in the board pinches the blade a bit, the PAM is a life saver in that situation!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  3. #3
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    rich save your self the headache and have a band mill do it for you,, they get so much a bf or per hour.. the time you spend working large piece on your saw isnt going to be worth it i my opinion. small amounts sure but the amount you need isnt..
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
    One hand washes the other!
    Don't put off today till tomorrow!

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by larry merlau View Post
    rich save your self the headache and have a band mill do it for you,, they get so much a bf or per hour.. the time you spend working large piece on your saw isnt going to be worth it i my opinion. small amounts sure but the amount you need isnt..
    Aw Larry where is the fun in that?

    Actually that is a very good point Larry, I would have never thought of that, as I don't have access to a band mill.

    Rich, maybe you could find out where one of these portable sawmill guys is one day, not far from you and drop by with your wood and get him to saw it up, might save you some money not having him come by your place just for a few cuts.

    Cheers!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  5. #5
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    Having just recently stopped in at my local lumber mill the first thought that came to mind for me was go to a local lumber supplier and have them cut it up for you with a setup more suited to doing it and pay the small price they charge for machine time. The local place near me actually has a sign with rates etc for their shop and they do all sorts of milling and cutting to order for clients so they geared for it. Way cheaper than your time per hour would be worth to your business and sanity.
    cheers

  6. #6
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    May 2011
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    weird... must be having a senior moment I know I replied to all of you lol..... ok here we go take 2

    Thanks for all the advice. I have two potentials in my area unfortunately one feels his services are worth a bit more than they truly are so he is off the list. The other I will have to see if he still does it.... That said, I had an epiphany after posting this, I may consider a chainsaw set up with a ripping blade which from the little research I have done so far seems quite reasonable and I dont have to worry about the dirty looks from the saw mill operator when I bring him some beams that may still have a few bits of metal in them and end up owing him a blade or three...
    I have a potential source, but got out of work too late today to call him. But he may have the 8/4 stock I need.
    He who laughs last, thinks slowest

  7. #7
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    Delton, Michigan
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    rich you need to get a metal detector for the beams and you dont want to use a chain saw either..and most bandsaw blades can be resharpened if they dont hit metal to hard. then its just the process of cutting out the bad spot..the quality of lumber from a chainsaw isnt very good for what your wanting to do.. sometimes we are our own worst enemies. pride ,stubborness all can take its toll on the pocket book rich..time is money as we all know and you wont safe anything using a chainsaw..
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
    One hand washes the other!
    Don't put off today till tomorrow!

  8. #8
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    I know Ill need to invest in a lumber wizard regardless. but looking at the ripping chains they make now the cuts look on par with a bandsaw believe it or not.
    I was pretty amazed at the quality. not that its overly important as I will joint and plan the stock then run it through the sander to get it baby smooth.

    This is higher end than im looking for but look at the cuts this guy is getting
    http://www.logosol.us/sawmills/woodworkers-mill/
    He who laughs last, thinks slowest

  9. #9
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    Mar 2008
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    I know a guy that might be able to help you out with the chestnut. Let me know and I'll ask.
    Sent him a massage I'll let ya know what he says.
    Last edited by Chuck Thoits; 03-16-2013 at 01:55 AM.
    It could be worse You could be on fire.
    Stupid hurts.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2011
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    Thank you sir!
    He who laughs last, thinks slowest

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