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Thread: New drywall technique...

  1. #1
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    New drywall technique...

    Been hanging lots of drywall this week, grumbling every time I sink a screw head below the paper. After a day or so, Jean hands me the impact driver rather than the regular cordless, thinking that one drives screws and the other just drills holes. So after explaining that using the impact driver on drywall was like swatting a fly on a screen window with a 2x4, I thought maybe I was being a bit harsh, and decided to try it. Works great. Better speed control than a regular driver, so I'm only over driving one or two screws every two or three sheets. Wouldn't do for a pro getting paid by the square foot, but works great for the rest of us.

    Whodathunkit?

  2. #2
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    They make an attachment you can chuck into a regular drill driver that loses contact with the screw at the right point. Professionals use a dedicated unit to do this, but it is available as an accessory. Jim.
    Coolmeadow Setters...
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  3. #3
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    What drill and impact driver do you have? Most these days have a clutched chuck with numbers around the base of the chuck. Set the adjustment ring to a smaller number, and the chuck will stop before tightening the screw too much.

  4. #4
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    I've got a couple of those bits that you mention Jim. The work pretty well, but the screw has to go in perfectly straight to keep from having a bit of a bump when its time to mud.

    Greg, I'm using a 12v makita, came as a driver/drill combo. I find the typical driver clutch too incosistent for drywalling. A slightly denser 2x4, or even the compressed edge of the sheet will need the clutch bumped up a couple notches. Same with speed. Run it in fast, and the clutch will ratchet at a lower torque than if you run it in slowly. Until I started using the impact driver, I'd just use the drill on "drill" and be careful setting the heads.

  5. #5
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    Not sure we're talking about the same thing. What I've seen is not just a bit, but an attachment. The outside bottoms out on the surface of the drywall. Once the screw goes in past what the bit will drive the screw, you obviously stop, even though the drill is still spinning. Drywallers never stop the drill, just pop another screw onto the end of the thing and shoot it in. they can just about go as fast as they can throw another screw on the thing. I bet a good drywaller could do a whold sheet in a minute once it is tacked up or held in place by co workers. Jim.

    Like this:Attachment 6526
    Coolmeadow Setters...
    Exclusively Irish!
    Home of Irish Setter Rescue of North Texas
    When Irish Eyes are smiling, they're usually up to something!!
    At a minimum, I'm Pentatoxic...but most likely, I'm a Pentaholic. There seems to be no known cure. Pentatonix, winners of The Sing Off, season 3


  6. #6
    John,

    I don't know how much drywall you have left to hang.

    If it is quite a bit, you might want to consider a Senco drywall screw gun. It uses drywall screws collated on a plastic strip. The strip auto feeds to the next screw when you push the tip of the gun against the drywall. It also uses a clutch but it is very accurate at setting the depth.

    I purchased one a year ago or so when I decided to finish part of my basement. Very fast and consistent. I would imagine a 4x8 sheet could be screwed off in less than 2 minutes once it is supported by props or a lift.

    The collated screws are a pricier than regular drywall screws but there is absolutely no fumbling with a single screw at all as you never have to touch a screw except to feed a new strip in when all of the screws on the previous one are used.

    I figured I could use the thing to hang all of the drywall I wanted and then throw it on Ebay. But as I use it I keep finding more uses for it: underlayment, decking, etc.

    Greg

  7. #7
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    Jim, the bit is called a dimpler. Should be available at any of the borgs. I got one a while back and am loath to do any rock without it. It is getting close to needing to be replaced and I can't justify a dedicated tool.

    If what you have going is working then stick with it!

  8. #8
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    I've seen screw guns with those on them, kinda like what Greg is describing, but never knew they came as an attachtment as well. The dimpler is what I was thinking of. Still got 60 sheets to go- got to go buy 40 more on Monday- but the impact driver is working really well, lots of control to set the head just below the surface without ripping the paper. That and I'm not in a big itching hurry if it means a tool I already own will work

  9. #9
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    john, the local supply house sells refirb p/c drywall guns for 60 bucks....a new milwaukee is about a hundred...money well spent even if you sell it when you`re done......tod
    [SIZE="1"] associated with several importers and manufacturers.[/SIZE]

  10. #10
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    I purchased my Makita drywall driver at a yard sale for $5. Best $5 I ever spent!
    It would be worth checking out the various auction sites if you intend on putting up more than just a couple of sheets.
    Last edited by Rennie Heuer; 03-30-2007 at 01:10 PM. Reason: )(@*#$(*@^$*&%$!@^ spell checkers!
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