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Thread: A very cool way to split wood!

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    A very cool way to split wood!

    Now obviously this would not be for the average homeowner, but it is still very cool!



    Very well thought out and also looks quite safe and fast.

    Cheers!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  2. #2
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    Dec 2007
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    Billings Missouri near Springfield Mo
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    Now that would have been nice to have when I was younger.
    A Turn N Time
    Components for John Smith Organs and the Hobby Organ Builder

    Frog Pond Guitars


    Before you criticize someone, you should walk a mile in their shoes. That way, when you criticize them, you're a mile away and you have their shoes.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
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    Westphalia, Michigan
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    I am a little skeptical and notice they are splitting mostly straight grained wood. I would like to see how it splits really knarly, knotty, twisted elm or some such wood.
    I'm a certifiable tree hugger. (it's a poor mans way of determining DBH before cutting the tree down)

  4. #4
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    Nova Scotia, 45N 64W
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    Well, you got my attention!
    We split and burn 8-10 cords a year and I'm always daydreaming about easier ways to do it. As Paul said, I'm not sure if it's able enough for some truly twisted stuff.
    However, there's a LOT to be said for having your work all up off the ground at bench height, both the unsplit and the finished product. Just that much less bending.

    I did think the guy was pretty casual with his hands doing the demo. One rule we have here: NEVER put your hands in between either end of the block and the business parts of the splitter.

    Thanks Stu

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Rideout View Post
    Well, you got my attention!
    We split and burn 8-10 cords a year and I'm always daydreaming about easier ways to do it. As Paul said, I'm not sure if it's able enough for some truly twisted stuff.
    However, there's a LOT to be said for having your work all up off the ground at bench height, both the unsplit and the finished product. Just that much less bending.

    I did think the guy was pretty casual with his hands doing the demo. One rule we have here: NEVER put your hands in between either end of the block and the business parts of the splitter.

    Thanks Stu
    Always happy to help you spend your money Peter
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Mountain Home, Arkansas
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    Very cool and innovative. Definitely a professional piece of equipment.
    I still like my black powder splitter that I can carry in my pocket.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    "Folks is funny critters."

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  7. #7
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    Mar 2013
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    just south of the LA/MS border off of I-55
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Rideout View Post
    Well, you got my attention!
    We split and burn 8-10 cords a year and I'm always daydreaming about easier ways to do it. As Paul said, I'm not sure if it's able enough for some truly twisted stuff.
    However, there's a LOT to be said for having your work all up off the ground at bench height, both the unsplit and the finished product. Just that much less bending.

    I did think the guy was pretty casual with his hands doing the demo. One rule we have here: NEVER put your hands in between either end of the block and the business parts of the splitter.

    Thanks Stu
    It is well thought out. As a greenwood turner that has a bad back and needs to handle heavy green wood I really liked some of his log handling stuff. Like you though, I'm a little leery of the safety aspect. I wouldn't be too concerned using it myself, hired help or teenagers? Looks like the splitter doesn't allow you to make but one mistake before it removes a body part or two. Working on less than perfect slope or when it was a little muddy could make that much more dangerous. I had to laugh a little when he dumped the pile of logs on his trailer too. Happened that first one wasn't round and chocked the rest of them. Wonder how often logs roll somewhere you don't want them to? Completely off the table or maybe even into somebody causing an injury? That whole rig does look like a way to deal with a lot of firewood fast and there are a lot of things I like about it. I can just imagine what it would look like by the time OSHA got through with it though!

    Hu

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