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Thread: Electric Chainsaw Mill

  1. #1
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    Oct 2006
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    Electric Chainsaw Mill

    I have a chainsaw mill, works well, but well, it's a gas saw, of course. Even though I have put a motorcycle muffler on it, and it is very quiet compared to most chainsaws, it's still not something that I wish to run in my workshop. I don't really have the space to run it outside, so what do I do? Well, I have this old heavy duty electric chainsaw, a Shindaiwa unit, it may not move the chain that fast, but the thing has some serious torque. With some ripping chain I've ordered, I think/hope it will do the job.

    This is the third chainsaw mill that I've made, so I have learned a few things along the way, I hope to incorporate them into this unit.




    Right now I've got the parts done that clamp onto the bar of the saw,


    The nose has a built in guard, to keep me from hurting myself.



    The pieces of square tubing with the nut welded to them and the T-handles will be the parts that are attached to the frame that will go along the guide board and that sets the thickness of the cut.

    I hope to be done soon, but I understand the ripping chain I ordered from Baileys Online will not be in stock until the end of May Dunno what's up with that....

    I'll be able to cut 42.5cm or about 16 3/4" wide, not the biggest chainsaw mill, but not bad either. If the saw will pull the ripping chain through the wood easily enough, I might try to find a longer bar, I don't think that Shindaiwa makes a longer bar, and bars from other makes don't fit, I think, so I might have to modify a bar to fit (had to do with how the tension adjuster works on this saw).

    I'm also going to make some kind of a fixture to hold the log in, some kind of cradle, that I can use for various lengths and diameters of logs, got to think about that some more too. I'll be able to hoist any log up to put the carriage under it, and I want it with one end higher than the other, I find that having gravity help push the mill along is a good thing.

    Cheers!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  2. #2
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    Cool!
    He who laughs last, thinks slowest

  3. #3
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    Jun 2008
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    GTA Ontario Canada
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    Very cool I love projects like this. Oh how i want a welder
    cheers

  4. #4
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    +1 on the cool. I love seeing homemade engineering projects come together.


    Have you seen the woodgears bandsaw / sawmill project? http://woodgears.ca/bandmill/index.html
    There's usually more than one way to do it...
    www.wordsnwood.com ........ facebook.com/wordsnwood

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Art Mulder View Post
    +1 on the cool. I love seeing homemade engineering projects come together.


    Have you seen the woodgears bandsaw / sawmill project? http://woodgears.ca/bandmill/index.html
    Yes, I've seen that, he is a very talented guy, but he really should buy a welder

    I've got the mill attachment done......


    Welding the last bit up using spacer blocks to keep everything square and level.


    Another look



    All welded up and I added a push handle.


    I think this will work OK.

    Now I have to figure out some sort of track to put on the ground that will hold the log in place.....?

    Cheers!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  6. #6
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    May 2007
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    Kansas City, Missouri
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    That will do! Nice work!
    Darren

    To a small child, the perfect granddad is unafraid of big dogs and fierce storms but absolutely terrified of the word “boo.” – Robert Brault

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    Well I got the first cut done today, a small chunk of VERY dry Doug Fir that I got from a house, I have about five 6' long pieces that I'm going to slab up, this was just the short end piece (long story about how I got these). This is the small end, maybe 10" in diameter, the large end is about 20" in diameter, so I should get some nice big slabs out of it at some point.



    I just put it on my workmate knock off, this really did not work well, as you can imagine the mill is heavy on the power head end, and the log wanted to roll to that side. The log also wanted to slide along the top of the workmate, but for one quick cut it worked. I built a guide for the first cut out of some plywood, it is like an I-beam, simple and straight forward, you can see the top part of the log still attached to the I-beam standing up against the wall to the right.


    The Bad

    • sawdust everywhere
    • Log not secure, it rolled
    • Log slide along the workmate
    • Jig's minimum cut it too large
    • T-handle to secure cut depth in the way




    The Good

    • Even with the crosscut chain the cutting speed was faster than I had hoped.
    • The motor did not really warm up at all during the cut
    • Using the manual oiler I was able to keep oil on the bar
    • The cord did not warm up during the cut.


    First up I need to make some sort of fixture to hold a log. I have a couple of ideas, first up is kind of a ladder or train track looking idea, this would have the log sit on it, and had one end of the ladder with a stop on it for the end of the log to go against, and then the other end would have some kind of a clamp that would grab on to that end of the lot, basically squeezing the log between the two ends of the ladder, if that make sense.


    I'd sure like to see any ideas or examples any of you have!



    I need to do two small mods on the mill, one is move the T-handle on the side nearest the power head up on the tube, it will get in the way of the big black knob when I do the second mod, which is to make the min cut thickness less. I think I'll cut an 1 1/2" off those tubes to give me a thinner min cut. The log holder will also be off the ground a bit, not need to be on my knees on a concrete floor. I'll also make the starting end higher by say a foot to let Mr. Gravity help out.


    Lastly I'm going to hook up some kind of a hose to the saw, to where the majority of the sawdust comes out, I figure I could direct it into a garbage can or something, save on the clean up some.


    Wish me luck!


    Cheers!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  8. #8
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  9. #9
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    How's the noise? You did this at ground-level right, not in the basement. Or is the neighbourhood well used to you?
    There's usually more than one way to do it...
    www.wordsnwood.com ........ facebook.com/wordsnwood

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Art Mulder View Post
    How's the noise? You did this at ground-level right, not in the basement. Or is the neighbourhood well used to you?
    Not noisy at all, I wear hearing protection, mostly so I can plug my iPhone into them and listen to music or a podcast, but it really is not noisy. Next time make a cut I'll use the decible meter on my iPhone to take a reading. Yes this is at ground level, in the new multi-purpose storage area. The neighbours tolerate me, but I don't think they will ever be used to me
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

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