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Thread: How to do an this...

  1. #1
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    How to do an this...

    At a craft fair I saw the desktop below. The inlay goes all the way through the top and the front desk drawers.
    The drawers are just a straight glue up. But how is the top cut? With a router and a jig?, Cut the strips, glue it up then run it through a planner?

    How do you do it?
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    Thanks,
    John

  2. #2
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    One way I've done similar things is to stack two contrasting woods, then cut the curves. You end up building two of whatever you're making...one the mirror image of the other. Here are a couple of paper towel holders I made out of oak and jatoba a few years ago. I also used thin (bendable) strips of maple for accent lines in the curved glue joints.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    So, I wonder if this seller had a mirror image of that desktop somewhere.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

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  3. #3
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    Hey Vaughn,

    Didn't know you could do anything but spinney work.
    Let's see, spinney, flat lander, musician, inlayer, finisher, art hanger---Wow a many talented guy.

    Enjoy,
    JimB
    First of all you have to be smarter than the machine.
    VOTING MEMBER

  4. #4
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    In this case I think the strips are thin enough that I'd bet the curves were just pattern routed (cut apart on BS, smooth one side with an edge sander or similar and use it as a pattern to route the other) and then the strips were laid in.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ryan Mooney View Post
    In this case I think the strips are thin enough that I'd bet the curves were just pattern routed (cut apart on BS, smooth one side with an edge sander or similar and use it as a pattern to route the other) and then the strips were laid in.
    I was thinking pattern with a router, that way almost no sanding and the 2 pieces fit perfectly back together with a contrasting wood between.

    Thanks,
    John

  6. #6
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    Your pattern bit in the router will be, perhaps, 1/2 inch diameter. That means that the second side won't match the first. For a gross example, assume a box. Cut the inside with a pattern bit, and the inside will be 1/2 inch shorter on each side. With the curves, they simply won't fit tight. Unless you had a flexible 1/2 inch thick strip to fill the space taken by the bit.

    If the curve is gradual, and the bandsaw blade is thin, you might get away with gluing the two pieces together directly. Or put in a flex contrast strip the thickness of the bandsaw blade (most of my blades are .035 with a kerf about .05, most veneer is about 1/42 or .024, so two layers of veneer would fill a bandsaw kerf).
    Charlie Plesums, Austin Texas
    (Retired early to become a custom furnituremaker)
    Lots of my free advice at www.solowoodworker.com

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie Plesums View Post
    Your pattern bit in the router will be, perhaps, 1/2 inch diameter. That means that the second side won't match the first. For a gross example, assume a box. Cut the inside with a pattern bit, and the inside will be 1/2 inch shorter on each side. With the curves, they simply won't fit tight. Unless you had a flexible 1/2 inch thick strip to fill the space taken by the bit.

    If the curve is gradual, and the bandsaw blade is thin, you might get away with gluing the two pieces together directly. Or put in a flex contrast strip the thickness of the bandsaw blade (most of my blades are .035 with a kerf about .05, most veneer is about 1/42 or .024, so two layers of veneer would fill a bandsaw kerf).
    The half inch taken out would be filled in by the strip of contrasting colored wood that is put in? Or am I having a brain fart?

    John

  8. #8
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    you got it right... if you are using a half inch pattern bit, you need to fill with a half inch of whatever. But getting a half inch of contrasting wood that will bend to follow a curve may not be easy... you may need to cut several thinner strips to fill that half inch.

    Many people seem to think you can just use a pattern bit and put the two boards together... they won't fit.... that is what I was trying to describe.
    Charlie Plesums, Austin Texas
    (Retired early to become a custom furnituremaker)
    Lots of my free advice at www.solowoodworker.com

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim C Bradley View Post
    Hey Vaughn,

    Didn't know you could do anything but spinney work.
    Let's see, spinney, flat lander, musician, inlayer, finisher, art hanger---Wow a many talented guy.

    Enjoy,
    JimB
    You forget being a great host as well Jim Although this is a rather common talent among the members of this family.
    Best regards,
    Toni

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    web site:http://www.toniciuraneta.com
    I also dream of a shop with north light where my hands can be busy, my soul rest and my mind wander...

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