Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Bandsaw question

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Tellico Plains, Tennessee
    Posts
    4,352

    Bandsaw question

    Don't know if this is right place... the saw is relatively new for me... only about 6 or 7 years old...

    I have a 14" Delta band saw with a Grizzly riser. Yesterday the top tire came off the wheel (sounded like the whole saw was coming apart before I could reach the switch... I had dodged away thinking the blade was coming out and I really don't relish the thought of a 1/2" 3TPI piece of steel whipping around the shop..). The tire didn't break, just slipped off the wheel and I was able to clean it and put it back, got the saw back running again, but got to wondering.... how often should the tires be changed on band saws? I know to clean them periodically, but not how often to change them out.
    Chuck
    Tellico Plains, TN
    https://www.etsy.com/shop/TellicoTurnings
    My parents taught me to respect my elders, but it's getting harder and harder to find any.
    If you go looking for trouble, it will usually find you.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    S E Washington State
    Posts
    3,777
    Good question? I don't even know the best method of cleaning them My last saw had some little brushes that road on the wheels to keep them pretty clean, my new saw doesn't.
    "We the People ......"

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    RETIRED(!) in Austintown, Ohio
    Posts
    5,321
    My guess is that the original rubber tire got hot - maybe from blade slippage due to a soon-to-fail axle bearing on the wheel. You know; the bearing binds, slowing the wheel, but the blade keeps right on moving in spite of it.

    Anyway, once the rubber tires have stretched, it's likely to happen again - and soon!

    I'd suggest checking out the bearing(s) right away, and replacing them if needed. They're actually a fairly common bearing at your local bearing shop, and relatively cheap. Don't go thru Delta for new bearings. They're mediocre quality, and way overpriced.

    As for tires, it's probably time for a new set. I've used replacement rubber ones, and they go on relatively easily, and work as well as the originals, but last time I replaced mine (only the third time in over thirty years!) I used the newer poly ones. I got mine at Hartville Hardware, btw. The poly tires go on with a bit more hassle than rubber ones, but they work very well, and aren't supposed to deteriorate over time like the old rubber ones do. They cost a bit more, though.

    BTW: an installation hint - soak the new poly tires in VERY hot water for five minutes, and wear protective (from the heat) gloves while installing. The heat makes the poly tires much more flexible, but they'll still shrink when the cool, for a very tight fit. I think the only way they'll ever come off is by cutting them.
    Jim D.
    Adapt, Improvise, Overcome!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    The Gorge Area, Oregon
    Posts
    4,699
    Well I don't know how often they should be changed as I reckon that depends on the tire type, usage, relative humidity and phase of the moon. In this case I'd probably go ahead and change them out since it likely stretched when it came off so its more likely to do so again.

    Paul you can get third party brushes, search: "bandsaw wheel brush" or you can make you own. I periodically use some spray on blade cleaner to de-gunk my wheels although I have no idea how much that helps, it makes me feel better

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Mountain Home, Arkansas
    Posts
    11,832
    Sounds like good advice. My 14" Grizzly is about nine years old. The tires have never been cleaned or even had mantras said over them but have had plenty of use. Might be time to consider updating with poly as you suggest.
    "Folks is funny critters."

    Think for yourselves and let others enjoy the privilege to do so, too. ~Voltaire

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Oceanside, So. Calif. 5 mi. to the ocean
    Posts
    4,944
    The 14 inch Delta BS I inherited from my father got 60+ years on the original set of tires. I saw minute cracks in the rubber and thought it was a good idea to change them. I don't know what the replacement tires are. I got them from Rockler. They are orange. They work find. They were a bit of a problem to put on. I am sure the water I used was not hot enough to make me wear gloves however.

    I still have the saw. It is a good saw. I keep a 1/4 inch blade on it for curvey stuff. I use the other BS for ripping and keep a 3/4 inch blade on it.

    Enjoy,
    JimB
    First of all you have to be smarter than the machine.
    VOTING MEMBER

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Tellico Plains, Tennessee
    Posts
    4,352
    Thanks all, guess I'll be getting new tires and bearings in the near future.
    Chuck
    Tellico Plains, TN
    https://www.etsy.com/shop/TellicoTurnings
    My parents taught me to respect my elders, but it's getting harder and harder to find any.
    If you go looking for trouble, it will usually find you.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Billings Missouri near Springfield Mo
    Posts
    4,552
    Delta had a bunch of BAD tires at one time. They replaced mine 4 times before I got a set that would stay on. I would get some aftermarket tires and get rid of Delta's
    A Turn N Time
    Components for John Smith Organs and the Hobby Organ Builder

    Frog Pond Guitars


    Before you criticize someone, you should walk a mile in their shoes. That way, when you criticize them, you're a mile away and you have their shoes.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    GTA Ontario Canada
    Posts
    12,258
    My newerrr Delta 14" was supplied with the poly type that Jim mentioned, they orange color. I also second checking the bearings. Found mine were bad after very little use and replaced them with a better quality. Pretty easy fix to do.

    Its actually quiet surprising what a few bits and pieces can do on this bandsaw if you replace them. If you do get to the tires and bearings, while you at it do the blocks and the main tension spring. It will be like a new saw after that, provided you have a decent blade on it too.

    Here is a link to the spring upgrade at LV

    Cool Blocks
    cheers

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    S E Washington State
    Posts
    3,777
    Well, while we have your attention on bandsaws. Which is better for blade guides, the cool blocks or roller bearing type? Just curious, My son's Ridgid has cool blocks and my new Grizzly has bearings. They both work for me but I'm not a bandsaw expert.
    "We the People ......"

Similar Threads

  1. Bandsaw blade question
    By Toni Ciuraneta in forum General Woodworking Q&A
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 03-06-2015, 07:26 PM
  2. Bandsaw question
    By Chuck Hanger in forum General Woodworking Q&A
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 02-10-2008, 11:41 PM
  3. Bandsaw Blade Question
    By Ed Nelson in forum General Woodworking Q&A
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 08-04-2007, 01:11 PM
  4. My own bandsaw question.
    By Jim O'Dell in forum New Tools
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 06-25-2007, 06:58 PM
  5. bandsaw blade question
    By Frank Fusco in forum General Woodworking Q&A
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 02-21-2007, 11:00 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •