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Thread: Mash Paddle - Unbelievably generous gift!

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Reno NV
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    13,361

    Mash Paddle - Unbelievably generous gift!

    So, The mail lady calls me and mumbles something. Never quite sure what she says, but I do know it means she has a package down at the mail box and I can either drive down 2 miles to pick it up, or else I'll have to drive all the way to town to get it tomorrow. I jump in the truck and lead foot it on down and she hands me this long narrow box.

    I'm liking the way this is shaping up so I lead foot it even faster on the way back home.

    Now you have to understand, I've been trading PM's back and forth with Ryan Mooney a bit lately about sausage making and brewing. One of the beers we had at BW was my attempt to make a 'blonde' ale that Ryan had passed my way.

    So I open the box and find this, a wooden box all nicely crated up.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Well, This is getting might interesting I say to myself. I go and grab a little pry bar and open up the crate.

    And look whats here! A beautifully hand carved mash paddle! Since I've been brewing one of the items I've been most in need of is a good mash paddle.

    My old one I made to thin and it comes dangerously close to breaking each time I use it.

    This one is really too nice looking to use, but I'm not going to let it stop me. I think a fine coating of wort might be just the ticket to finish this off!

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Ryan, I don't know what to say. This is just incredible! I'm actually just blown away by this. If I had any brewing friends around I'm quite sure they would be very, very jealous!

    Thank you very, very much!
    Programmer - An organism that turns coffee into software.
    If all your friends are exactly like you, What an un-interesting life it must be.
    "A door is what a dog is perpetually on the wrong side of" Ogden Nash


  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    bethel springs TN, but was born and raised in north east PA
    Posts
    3,132
    Well i'm not a brewer, or a drinker. But that's one sharp looking Big spoon. (paddle)

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Delton, Michigan
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    17,475
    well done on both parts guys..
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
    One hand washes the other!
    Don't put off today till tomorrow!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    The Gorge Area, Oregon
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    4,699
    Here's hoping it works as well as it looks! Brent had grumbled a bit about his old paddle a few times and asked some Q's about one of the other ones I'd made so I figured the best way to (finally - months later ) respond was by example. I was digging through my wood stash a while back (before BW actually!! was even hoping to get this done before that - needless to say my timeline slipped) and saw a piece of wood that just begged to be a mash paddle. My first thought was that it was hickory but after cutting into it I'm pretty sure its not - best guess I have is elm (the risks of picking up stacks of unlabeled wood from a furniture factory..) either way it was pretty straight grain, seemed tough enough and wasn't to porous and was just about spot on the right size so it sure looked like a mash paddle trying to escape from a board to me

    I was slightly worried about the (carved) knot at the end gathering gunk so I left it as a larger strand size which should hopefully be easy enough to clean. I usually leave most mash paddles mostly unadorned for easy cleaning but sometimes can't help myself.

    One other feature perhaps worth noting is the bowl (paddle?) end - I tend to leave them rather square. Because of that the lip on the end is rather weak so I take most of it off and just leave the sides of the bowl as wings. For the purpose that actually works pretty well - the square end gets into the corner of the mash tun/kettle and having a wee bit of a remaining bowl you can also use it to skim samples off of the top.

    Anyway - here's hoping it makes your next brew day just a smidge more enjoyable

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Plainwell, Michigan
    Posts
    4,857
    How kool Ryan great looking paddle, and Brent, you had better use it, just the looks of it will make your brews incredible well done

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Reno NV
    Posts
    13,361
    Quote Originally Posted by Ryan Mooney View Post
    Here's hoping it works as well as it looks! Brent had grumbled a bit about his old paddle a few times and asked some Q's about one of the other ones I'd made so I figured the best way to (finally - months later ) respond was by example. I was digging through my wood stash a while back (before BW actually!! was even hoping to get this done before that - needless to say my timeline slipped) and saw a piece of wood that just begged to be a mash paddle. My first thought was that it was hickory but after cutting into it I'm pretty sure its not - best guess I have is elm (the risks of picking up stacks of unlabeled wood from a furniture factory..) either way it was pretty straight grain, seemed tough enough and wasn't to porous and was just about spot on the right size so it sure looked like a mash paddle trying to escape from a board to me

    I was slightly worried about the (carved) knot at the end gathering gunk so I left it as a larger strand size which should hopefully be easy enough to clean. I usually leave most mash paddles mostly unadorned for easy cleaning but sometimes can't help myself.

    One other feature perhaps worth noting is the bowl (paddle?) end - I tend to leave them rather square. Because of that the lip on the end is rather weak so I take most of it off and just leave the sides of the bowl as wings. For the purpose that actually works pretty well - the square end gets into the corner of the mash tun/kettle and having a wee bit of a remaining bowl you can also use it to skim samples off of the top.

    Anyway - here's hoping it makes your next brew day just a smidge more enjoyable
    I think the way you have the paddle end shaped is just about perfect. Elm, Hickory, It's nice and tight grain that's for sure, and it's very tough and thick enough to handle 10 gallon batches for sure!

    Really, It's fantastic. I can't even tell you how anxious I am to use it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Niemi View Post
    How kool Ryan great looking paddle, and Brent, you had better use it, just the looks of it will make your brews incredible well done
    I will be using it. I'm crash cooling the current batch that's in the fermenter and will be putting it into kegs. Looks like I get to have another brew day this weekend!
    Programmer - An organism that turns coffee into software.
    If all your friends are exactly like you, What an un-interesting life it must be.
    "A door is what a dog is perpetually on the wrong side of" Ogden Nash


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    NH
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    4,006
    It could be worse You could be on fire.
    Stupid hurts.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Billings Missouri near Springfield Mo
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    4,552
    Good on you Ryan and good for you Brent
    A Turn N Time
    Components for John Smith Organs and the Hobby Organ Builder

    Frog Pond Guitars


    Before you criticize someone, you should walk a mile in their shoes. That way, when you criticize them, you're a mile away and you have their shoes.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    North of Reno, NV...middle of the desert
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    1,930
    Can't wait for him to use it..it is more impressive than the pictures show

    Thanks Ryan

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Kansas City, Missouri
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    13,452
    Well, I'm not a brewer (yet), but I'm jealous if that counts! Wow Ryan, really nice job!
    Darren

    To a small child, the perfect granddad is unafraid of big dogs and fierce storms but absolutely terrified of the word “boo.” – Robert Brault

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