Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 15

Thread: Thinking About Buying A Chainsaw for Bowl Prep Work?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Laurinburg NC
    Posts
    316

    Thinking About Buying A Chainsaw for Bowl Prep Work?

    Im thinking about buying a new chainsaw mainly to use for bowl prep work. I want something easy to start and dependable, doesnt have to be a really big saw..maybe 16"...What have you guys had good or bad luck with?? Any recommendations?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    RETIRED(!) in Austintown, Ohio
    Posts
    5,321
    Stihl MS210 or MS230. Dependable, and easy to start.
    Jim D.
    Adapt, Improvise, Overcome!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    ABQ NM
    Posts
    30,014
    I'll second the suggestion for Stihl. A bit more expensive, but well worth it. I still smile every time I use mine. I would have saved myself about $200 if I had bought the Stihl first, instead of buying a Poulan at Home Depot and wearing it out in a year or so.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Carlyle IL
    Posts
    350
    I have a 24 year old stihl ms023, which I believe is the predecessor to the 230. Never had a problem in that time.

    value wise it was a "inbetween" model.... The model above my 023 was priced too close to the 023 model in the product line-up thus it never sold well.

    Iow for an extra $20-$30, I could have had a more powerful saw..... But overall, I have been very satisfied with this size saw.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    2,749
    Just thought I'd ask, as I was looking at chainsaws today - will a 16", 11 amp electric chainsaw cut a 7" cherry log down the middle (about 15" for most of the firewood I've collected?)
    Cheers,
    Roger


    The other member of Mensa, but not the NRA

    Everyone is a self-made person.

    "The thing about quotes on the internet is that you cannot confirm their veracity" -Abraham Lincoln

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    The Gorge Area, Oregon
    Posts
    4,698
    I have a Husqavarna 372XP and its LOTS of saw and runs a 24" bar just fine (it was my grandpas before me). I'd say with either a Husqavarna or a Stihl you won't be to far wrong. With either one if you can swing the $$'s get into the pro line you'll have a LOT heavier duty saw, one step down from that both have a "farm and ranch" line that is generally quite good as well. Personally I'd avoid the homeowner line (although yeah it would still be better than a Poulan).

    What would probably drive my decision between them is if one had a good dealer in my area that could provide service and support; beyond that they're both great saws.

    I don't think the 24" bar is excessively large as I've used all of it several times. If you're getting yard wood, from my limited experience, it seems like its not uncommon to have to carve the tree up a bit to get useful pieces out of it. I recently took some crotches off of a largish elm the neighbour took down. It was ~3' across where it forked out and I had to cut from both directions to get the pieces I wanted out. After all the inclusions and what not were cut off though I only ended up with the largest bowls being 12-14" across.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    ABQ NM
    Posts
    30,014
    Even thought I'm a Stihl fan, I agree with everything Ryan has said above. His recommendation to find a good dealer is a very good one. In my case, my local dealer sold both Stihl and Husqvarna (as well as Echo, Shindawa, and several others), but he said in my area Stihls were the most commonly used by the local tree companies, and he can generally get Stihl parts easier and faster than he can the other brands. But in differor ent areas, different dealers will suggest other brands. Husqvarna is the other brand I'd recommend. There are a lot of very happy Husqvarna owners on the arborist forums. (Tree guys tend to know a lot about chainsaws.)

    I also agree with the recommendation to go with the "pro" or "mid-range" models and stay away from the homeowner saws. In my case, I couldn't justify the extra $100+ to buy the pro version of my saw so I got the MS390 instead. Same horsepower, but a little bit heavier in weight. Probably more aluminum and plastic parts instead of magnesium, too, but still should last the rest of my lifetime. It's the biggest mid-range saw Stihl sells, and it'll spin a 24" chain through anything I've pointed it at without even breathing hard.

    Lastly, I'd also suggest going with as long of bar as you can afford. Just as soon as you buy a 16" chainsaw you're gonna find an 18" log.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    ABQ NM
    Posts
    30,014
    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Tulk View Post
    Just thought I'd ask, as I was looking at chainsaws today - will a 16", 11 amp electric chainsaw cut a 7" cherry log down the middle (about 15" for most of the firewood I've collected?)
    It probably will, but it'll likely be quite a bit of work. If you cut directly into the end of the log (cutting into end grain), the cutting will be real slow. If you cut lengthwise into the side of the log (along the grain), it'll cut faster but it's quite possible the saw will bog down from the long shavings coming off the chain. Making a 15" lengthwise cut with a 16" saw is a lot of work for any chainsaw, especially an electric one.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    2,749
    Thanks, Vaughan. I was thinking about cutting end to end, in roughly 7" logs. For the amount of use I would get out of one, I can't justify much more $.
    Cheers,
    Roger


    The other member of Mensa, but not the NRA

    Everyone is a self-made person.

    "The thing about quotes on the internet is that you cannot confirm their veracity" -Abraham Lincoln

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    The Gorge Area, Oregon
    Posts
    4,698
    Roger, another option would be to cut a kerf (maybe 2" or 3" if you can swing it, maybe take a couple of passes) on both sides with say a circular saw (nailing/screwing/clamping/somethinging a board on top for stability & guide might be a good idea as would fixing the log so it can't roll) and then splitting the log with some wedges. If the grain is really twisty it might not work as well as you'd like but if its at least moderately straight grained I reckon you'll most likely have a better time doing it that way than trying to use the 16" electric on it.

Similar Threads

  1. Thinking about buying this
    By Bob Gibson in forum New Tools
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 12-31-2013, 03:08 AM
  2. Best Bandsaw Blade for Bowl Blank Prep?
    By Mike Turner in forum Turning Tool Questions and Show & Tell
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 07-04-2013, 05:39 PM
  3. Who is always thinking of buying a tool they don't really need?
    By keith Boutselis in forum General Woodworking Q&A
    Replies: 28
    Last Post: 08-16-2012, 07:19 PM
  4. Thinking cup {aka} spin work gone flat
    By Ken Cook in forum Flatwork Project Showcase
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 06-01-2011, 04:48 AM
  5. Been a while/Kitchen Prep Table
    By Alex Reid in forum Flatwork Project Showcase
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 01-21-2011, 04:45 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •